ACINETOBACTER BAUMANNII – VIRULENCE FACTORS AND EPIDEMIOLOGY OF INFECTIONS

Publications

Share / Export Citation / Email / Print / Text size:

Postępy Mikrobiologii - Advancements of Microbiology

Polish Society of Microbiologists

Subject: Microbiology

GET ALERTS

ISSN: 0079-4252
eISSN: 2545-3149

DESCRIPTION

89
Reader(s)
103
Visit(s)
0
Comment(s)
0
Share(s)

SEARCH WITHIN CONTENT

FIND ARTICLE

Volume / Issue / page

Related articles

VOLUME 60 , ISSUE 4 (December 2021) > List of articles

ACINETOBACTER BAUMANNII – VIRULENCE FACTORS AND EPIDEMIOLOGY OF INFECTIONS

Anna Marszalik / Karolina Sidor / Agnieszka Kraśnicka / Marta Wróblewska / Tomasz Skirecki / Tomasz Jagielski / Radosław Stachowiak *

Keywords : Acinetobacter baumannii, ESKAPEE, VAP

Citation Information : Postępy Mikrobiologii - Advancements of Microbiology. Volume 60, Issue 4, Pages 267-279, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/PM-2021.60.4.21

License : (CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0)

Received Date : January-2021 / Accepted: September-2021 / Published Online: 12-January-2022

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative saprophytic rod inhabiting both moist niches and dry surfaces. The wide spread of the microbe in the environment by means of minimal nutritional requirements and exceptional survival capabilities give the opportunities to occupy hospital niches, and thus to create threats for hospitalized patients. This bacterium may be a part of the human microbiota as an opportunistic pathogen which upon the host’s weakening, causes less or more serious diseases. A. baumannii is an etiological factor of ventilator-associated pneumonia, which is especially dangerous for patients in intensive care units (in Poland every fifth patient suffers from such infection). Due to the increasing multidrug resistance of A. baumannii, this bacterium belongs to the group of priority pathogens. Fighting such dangerous bacteria is difficult due to their natural resistance as well as acquired resistance mechanisms in response to environmental threats. The unique ability of A. baumannii to cause diseases and acquire resistance to numerous antibiotics, make it necessary to control and prevent these infections.

Gram-ujemna pałeczka Acinetobacter baumannii jest drobnoustrojem saprofitycznym często zasiedlającym wilgotne nisze, potrafi też jednak przetrwać na powierzchniach suchych. Szerokie rozpowszechnienie w środowisku za sprawą minimalnych wymagań odżywczych oraz wyjątkowych zdolności adaptacyjnych przekłada się na możliwość opanowania nisz w środowisku szpitalnym, a tym samym na stwarzanie zagrożenia dla hospitalizowanych pacjentów. Bakteria ta może wchodzić w skład mikrobioty człowieka jako oportunistyczny patogen, który w chwili osłabienia organizmu gospodarza wywołuje poważne zakażenia. Pałeczka A. baumannii stanowi dominujący czynnik etiologiczny zapalenia płuc związanego z wentylacją mechaniczną, co jest szczególnie niebezpieczne dla pacjentów na oddziałach intensywnej terapii (w Polsce do takich zakażeń dochodzi u co piątego pacjenta). Przez wzgląd na narastającą wielolekooporność A. baumannii Światowa Organizacja Zdrowia zaliczyła tę bakterię do grupy patogenów priorytetowych. Zwalczanie takich drobnoustrojów jest wyjątkowo trudne ze względu na ich zarówno naturalną, jak i nabywaną zdolność szybkiego rozwijania różnorodnych mechanizmów oporności w odpowiedzi na zagrożenia ze strony środowiska. Wyjątkowa zdolność A. baumannii do wywoływania zakażeń i nabywania oporności na coraz większą liczbę leków implikuje konieczność wdrożenia szczególnej kontroli w profilaktyce zakażeń.

1. Wstęp. 2. Charakterystyka i taksonomia. 3. Występowanie i warunki hodowli. 4. Epidemiologia. 5. Czynniki wirulencji. 6. Zwalczanie. 7. Podsumowanie

Graphical ABSTRACT

1. Introduction

Gram-negative rod Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen with epidemic potential and contributing to outbreaks of infection worldwide. A. baumannii rods are etiological agents, mainly of lower respiratory tract infections in mechanically ventilated patients, bloodstream infections and wound infections in field hospitals. Increasing drug resistance, hight mortality among patients infected with this pathogen and the difficulty in treating the infections led the World Health Organisation (WHO) to include this pathogen in the list of the most challenging pathogens of the current decade.

2. Characteristics and taxonomy

In 1911, the microbiologist Martinus Beijerinck, using a medium enriched with calcium acetate, isolated a microorganism from the soil which he named Micrococcus calcoaceticus. The lack of precise characterisation led to a new name being given to the species already known as Bacterium anitratum and Moraxella lwoffii var. glucidolytica – later M. glucidolytica. In 1953 Jean Brisou proposed to include M. glucidolytica in the genus Achromobacter, but a year later together with Andre-Romain Prevot he came to the conclusion that in order to distinguish them from the mobile representatives of Achromobacter it is worth creating a new taxon, proposing the name Acinetobacter (akinetos – unable to move, bactrum – rod). In 1968 Paul Baumann’s team finally determined that the above taxa (then considered separable) belonged to a single genus – Acinetobacter, which was formalised three years later by a decision of the Subcommittee on Taxonomy of Moraxella and Related Bacteria [38, 52]. The final name of the microorganism, Acinetobacter baumannii, was given to honour two American bacteriologists: Paul and Linda Baumann [39]. In the 1970s, A. baumannii was recognized as an opportunistic pathogen. Initially, two species were included in the genus Acinetobacter: A. lwoffii and A. calcoaceticus [72]. In 2015, the genus Acinetobacter included 33 species [21]. It currently includes more than 50 species, most of which are environmental [100]. The genus Acinetobacter belongs to the gamma-proteobacteria (this name refers to Proteus, a Greek god capable of changing form) [62]. The current taxonomic position of the species A. baumannii is shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 1.

Taxonomy of the species Acinetobacter baumannii

Based on Szewczyk et al. [88].

10.21307_PM-2021.60.4.21-f001.jpg

These bacteria are oval, almost spherical Gram-negative rods, occasionally appear in diplococcal form. Despite its name indicating lack of motility, Acinetobacter has the ability to move. These organisms are oxidase-negative absolute aerobes, within which a distinction can be made between species capable of oxidising glucose (A. baumannii) and those incapable of this process (A. lwoffii, A. haemolyticus) [64, 88].

Due to the high phenotypic similarity and thus difficulty in distinguishing between six species of the genus Acinetobacter: A. calcoaceticus, A. nosocomialis, A. pittii, A. seifertii, A. lactucae (A. dijkshoorniae) and A. baumannii, the group A. calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex was formed for them [24, 68]. The species of the genus Acinetobacter most frequently causing infections in humans is A. baumannii, A. calcoaceticus comes second and A. lwoffii third. Other Acinetobacter species can also be etiological agents of infections, but much less frequently than the above three. An exception is A. seifertii (genetically closely related to A. baumannii), which is the most frequent cause of infections in Asia [100].

Within the genus Acinetobacter, especially A. baumannii, there are naturally competent strains, i.e. capable under natural conditions of extracting DNA from the surrounding environment in order to use free nucleic acids as substrates for repair of their own genetic material or incorporation of new fragments into the genome. The process of acquiring new characteristics and modifying those already possessed is genetically determined and requires the participation of the products of several genes. Bacteria may also apply a kind of predation, consisting in causing the death of nearby cells belonging to unrelated species in order to enrich the gene pool [91, 93]. For example, A. baumannii is able to lyse K. pneumoniae or S. aureus cells and then integrate DNA fragments from them into its own genome, which enabled the tested strains to acquire resistance to antimicrobials (β-lactams, including carbapenems) [91]. Natural transformation significantly affects the plasticity of the A. baumannii genome, and as a result favours the emergence of multi-drug resistant strains. It is worth noting that in A. baumannii there is a predominant tendency to obtain non-coding DNA fragments instead of coding sequences, which increases the pool of mobile genetic elements, and it has been found that the preferred source of genetic material for this rod is DNA from other Gram-negative bacteria [91, 93]. In addition, chemical compounds that pollute the environment can increase the potential of bacterial cells to take up foreign DNA. The molecular mechanism of this phenomenon is based on the enhancement of recA gene expression (coding homologous recombination factor) by compounds with mutagenic potential, which increases (up to twofold) the frequency of integration of the uptaken DNA into the chromosome, and thus the efficiency of genomic DNA transformation. Thus, for example, commonly used water chlorination, aimed at increasing the safety of drinking water, may contribute to an increase in transformation efficiency and thus to the emergence of a new, potentially dangerous strain [59]. This mechanism may further increase the efficiency of coselection, a phenomenon that significantly contributes to the increase of antibiotic resistance in strains living in environments contaminated with heavy metals in particular [36].

In 2014, sequences identified as moderate phages were found to be more abundant than conjugation elements in the genome of this rod, highlighting their important role as horizontal gene transfer vectors. Additionally, the presence of complex variable CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) systems in the Acinetobacter genome was observed. The collected data led to the hypothesis that the current population of A. baumannii may have evolved from the original small population of this species by negative selection [90].

3. Occurrence and breeding conditions

Bacteria of the genus Acinetobacter are widespread saprophytes, found in wetlands, moist soil, ponds, sewage, water treatment plants, fish rearing tanks, and seawater. As they are commonly found in soil and water in nature, their isolation is relatively easy. In the laboratory, pure cultures can be obtained with the use of media enriched with up to 0.2% acetate at pH 5.5–6.0. The bacteria are one of the predominant bacteria in tundra soils and also belong to the aerobic microbiota of saline lakes and brines. In addition, they can also be found in the air (detected, e.g., in dust during sandstorms). Importantly, in aerosols of the air near landfills, composting plants or sewage treatment plants, as well as in office spaces, Acinetobacter spp. dominates quantitatively over other genera [8].

It was shown that the addition of ethanol to the medium enhances the growth of A. baumannii and also increases the tolerance of this microorganism to salinity. In the presence of ethanol (acting as a signalling molecule) the bacterium can survive the salt concentrations inhibiting its growth under normal conditions. For this reason, co-culture with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which secretes ethanol into the medium, also enhances the growth of this bacterium. The presence of this compound affects the induction of A. baumannii proteins, including those involved in lipid and carbohydrate anabolism, which enhances biofilm formation and reduces bacterial motility. The presence of ethanol also induces the production of indolyl-3-acetic acid (IAA), which is a plant hormone that enhances plant tolerance to the presence of bacteria. A. baumannii treated with this alcohol show increased pathogenicity in a nematode infection model. Noteworthy, in humans, ethanol predisposes the organism to A. baumannii infection, promoting adaptation and survival of this pathogen [69, 84].

Bacteria of the species A. baumannii are highly adaptable, which enables them to inhabit hospital environments. They inhabit there not only moist surfaces (e.g. respiratory systems of ventilators) but also dry ones (e.g. medical equipment), which is an unusual feature for Gram-negative rods [1]. They are part of the physiological permanent or temporary microbiota (of the skin, respiratory and genitourinary tract mucous membranes or colon) of both patients and medical staff [58].

Interestingly, several hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter strains were isolated during assembly of the Mars Phoenix lander. Proteomic analysis revealed the presence of catalase and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase. Due to such high resistance, it will probably be necessary to include representatives of this genus in the biological conatmination of spacecraft during missions to detect traces of life beyond our planet [20].

4. Epidemiology

A. baumannii is among the most common pathogens that are multidrug resistant (MDR), extensively drug resistant (XDR) and even pandrug-resistant (PDR). It is extremely important from a medical point of view, since above mentioned strains are increasingly the causes of nosocomial infections [70]. A 2007 study of etiological agents in intensive care units on five continents showed that A. baumannii was the fifth most common pathogen [94]. In Europe, it is the third most common pathogen causing mechanical ventilation-associated pneumonia (VAP), just after S. aureus and P. aeruginosa [48]. Bacterial pneumonia is a particular threat to patients in intensive care units (ICUs) [33].

The development of VAP occurs on average in every fifth patient (8–28%) mechanically ventilated. Mortality in this group of patients is particularly high and ranges from 24% to as much as 50%, and sometimes may even reach 76% [16, 41]. It is estimated that each year A. baumannii infections cause about 15,000 deaths [85]. The main etiological agents of nosocomial pulmonary infections are S. aureus, Enterobacteriaceae, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii, and the type of agent depends both on the duration of the patient’s hospital stay and the antimicrobial treatment administered earlier. It should be emphasized that VAP caused by P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. developed in up to 65% of patients who received therapy with a broad-spectrum antibiotic in the two weeks preceding infection and in only 19% of those who did not receive such therapy [16, 41]. The risk of acquiring Acinetobacter spp. related VAP also increases in the presence of hypertension (40%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (28%), diabetes mellitus (23%), and invasive procedures: urinary catheters (99%), central vascular catheters (mainly carotid and subclavian) (83%), or nasogastric probes (74%) [29].

A study of bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI) in 16 hospitals in southern Poland between 2016 and 2019 found that Gram-negative bacteria were responsible for 27.8% of BSI cases, of which carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii was responsible for 70.6% of ICU infections. This rod was present in surgical wards in all 16 hospitals [17]. Epidemiological studies in Poland and Ukraine on the causation of VAP have shown a different frequency of occurrence of individual species. However, it was found that Gram-negative bacteria predominate as etiological factors of this disease. Importantly, MDR strains of A. baumannii were much more frequently isolated in Poland (26.9%) than in Ukraine (14.6%), which may result from differences in the strategy of antibiotic use in both countries [37]. Severe MDR A. baumannii infections are associated with high mortality rates, up to 70% in VAP and 43% in bloodstream infections. In response to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, the UK government announced in 2014 that failure to curb the overuse of antibiotics would result in 10 million deaths per year from bacterial infections by 2050, more than from cancer, which accounts for 8.2 million deaths per year [70].

The A. baumannii bacterium, along with Enterobacter spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecium and Escherichia coli, is one of the multidrug-resistant pathogens that the Infectious Diseases Society of America has designated with the acronym ESKAPEE. This acronym is derived from word escape, which refers to the particular resistance of these bacteria to antibiotics currently available against them [77, 78]. In 2017, WHO included A. baumannii on the list of antibiotic-resistant pathogens for which finding effective antimicrobial therapies is considered a priority – carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii was identified as one of three pathogens of critical importance [56, 89].

A. baumannii is one of the most frequently isolated pathogens among ICU patients. This is due to the specific features of this microorganism, such as its high ability to accumulate various resistance mechanisms (as a result of mutations and acquisition of plasmids, transposons, integrons, resistance islands) and the ability to survive in adverse environmental conditions (dryness, contact with disinfectants), as well as the production of biofilm.

It is also estimated that approximately one million A. baumannii infections occur annually worldwide, including approximately 45,000 in the USA, half of which are caused by carbapenem-resistant strains, causing a mortality rate of nearly 20% [85]. The problem of increasing drug resistance of A. baumannii strains is enormous; one report indicates that overall worldwide in 2004, 23% of A. baumannii clinical isolates showed multidrug resistance, while in 2014 it was already 63% [35]. Infections caused by XDR strains have a very high mortality rate of up to 70%, and up to 88% for XDR strains showing resistance to carbapenems [6]. Carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB) strains are currently the cause of really serious nosocomial infections, especially in the ICUs. The increase in the number of strains resistant to colistin (ABCR, A. baumannii colistin-resistant), the so-called antibiotic of last resort, is considered to be an even greater problem. Mortality among patients infected with ABCR strains is about 85% and is more than twice as high as in the case of infection with strains susceptible to this antibiotic [60].

WHO in 2017 reported that 45–65% of CRAb strains and 40–70% of MDR strains were responsible for healthcare-associated infections in the US between 2011 and 2014 [85]. Among the few countries that conduct surveillance for the prevalence of A. baumannii infection in the community is the United States. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stated in a report in 2013 that MDR strains of A. baumannii cause about 7,000 infections annually in the US, accounting for about 10% of all nosocomial infections in the country, 500 of which end in deaths [14]. Such surveillance is also carried out in England by Public Health England, but on a narrower scope – only for bloodstream infections.

A. baumannii rods are often isolated from urine, blood, cerebrospinal fluid or surgical wound samples of patients with nosocomial infections. In some patients, A. baumannii is part of the natural microbiota of mucous membranes and, under appropriate conditions, can cause infections of the wounds, respiratory tract, urinary tract (catheter-related infections), peritoneum or meninges. Patients who are critically ill, mechanically ventilated, after surgical procedures, weakened by prolonged hospitalization and related treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics belong to the special risk group [2, 28]. The main hospital reservoir of A. baumannii are humid environments: bathrooms and kitchens [43]. In contrast to the aforementioned hospital-acquired A. baumannii (HA-Ab) risk factors for colonization and multidrug-resistant A. baumannii infection, community-acquired A. baumannii (CA-Ab) risk factors include alcohol and cigarette abuse, subtropical and tropical climates, but also general health, including certain comorbidities such as diabetes or chronic lung disease. Exposure of macrophages to ethanol (in physiological doses supplied to the body by alcohol abusers) has been shown to significantly reduce the ability of cells to phagocytose (6.25 mmol/l dose by 23.4%, and 12.5 mmol/l dose by 51.7%). This effect is most likely due to a significant reduction in the expression of a regulator of the actin polymerisation signalling cascade (GTPase-RhoA). Additionally, ethanol inactivates NO synthase, thereby increasing the survival of A. baumannii in macrophages. Furthermore, alcohol modifies the production of cytokines (produced mainly in lung epithelial cells), thus significantly exacerbating the course of infections [4]. Among patients with CA-Ab infections, a mortality rate as high as 64% was reported in 2015. At the same time, it should be emphasised that it is difficult to state unequivocally whether the reason for such a high mortality rate is solely due to the virulence characteristics of the strains or to the weakened host organism [21, 101].

Also, environmental Acinetobacter strains very often produce enzymes that give antibiotic resistance (e.g. carbapenemases, broad-spectrum beta-lactamases), making them an important reservoir of antibiotic resistance in the out-of-hospital environment [1]. Unfortunately, A. baumannii is becoming a significant etiological agent of animal diseases. Most infections with this pathogen occur in veterinary clinics, causing diseases such as pyoderma in dogs, necrotizing fasciitis in cats, urinary tract infection, equine thrombophlebitis and lower respiratory tract infection, foal sepsis, pneumonia in mink or skin lesions in falcons. Animal isolates show high genetic diversity. In addition, they have different sequence types from humans. With the transmission of the bacteria, animals can contribute to the spread of new carbapenemases and the risk of such transmission increases in companion animals. It should be noted that the bacterium is identified not only in sick but also in healthy individuals, particularly on the skin of dogs. Therefore, it cannot be excluded that animals may act as reservoirs of A. baumannii [80, 92].

In 2017, the potential reservoir of A. baumannii in birds was checked. The bacteria were isolated from different bird species (hens – from 3%, geese – 8% and white stork chicks – 25%). The virulence of the obtained strains proved to be comparable to that observed in clinical strains. Bacterial sequence analysis revealed a close relationship between the chicken isolate from Germany and the human clinical isolate from China, as well as links between the farm animal isolates and the human clinical isolates associated with international clonal lines. Stork isolates showed similarity to the human clinical from the USA. The study suggests that A. baumannii may be considered a zoonotic pathogen that can additionally transmit to livestock [98].

A comprehensive assessment of the epidemiological situation in Poland still requires further extensive research. In 2018, a report by the National Institute of Medicines, developed as part of the National Programme for the Protection of Antibiotics (NPOA), reported that almost 32% of hospitalisations had acquired infections in Polish ICUs. The incidence of pneumonia was 50.7% of infected patients (17% of all hospitalisations), vascular bed infections (including catheter-related infections) 35.4%, A. baumannii proved to be the third most common aetiological agent of pneumonia (13%, just after P. aeruginosa – 25.5% and Klebsiella spp. – 22.8%) and sixth for vascular bed infections (3.6%). As many as 61.8% of A. baumannii strains isolated showed resistance to carbapenems [23].

A 6-year observation (2011–2016) in the ICU of the University Hospital in Wrocław among 2549 patients, showed that A. baumannii was responsible for 31% of infections, with 73.8% related to pneumonia associated with artificial ventilation. There was also an increase in nosocomial infections caused by A. baumannii over the years, with 16.5% in 2011 and 41% in 2016. The strains studied were susceptible to colistin, amikacin, imipenem, meropenem and ciprofloxacin in 100%, 10.7%, 12.3%, 11.5% and 2.4% respectively, and multidrug-resistant strains were 98.36% [25]. The prevalence of A. baumannii infections was lower in this centre than in the ICU of the Clinical Hospital of the Silesian Medical University in the first 12 months of its operation, where it was 38.8%.

The study of 234 patients hospitalized in the Department of Intensive Care Medicine of the Pomeranian Medical Academy of Independent Public Clinical Hospital No. 1 in Szczecin showed that the most common etiological agents were A. baumannii (18.6%) and P. aeruginosa (16.9%). Pneumonia was most frequently caused by A. baumannii – in 23.09%, while peritonitis was caused by E. coli (20.3%); A. baumannii caused 17.4% of infections.

A retrospective study of adult ICU patients (2547 patients) in southern Poland participating in a multicentre standardised infection control programme between 2013 and 2015, within the European Healthcare-associated Infections Surveillance Network (HAI-Net), showed that A. baumannii was also the predominant aetiological agent of secondary bloodstream infections in the ICU (34.5%). Of these, 78.8% of strains showed resistance to imipenem, 72.7% to meropenem and doripenem, and 57.6% to sulbactam [95].

The main mechanism of resistance of clinical strains of this rod to carbapenems are CHDL-type carbapenemases, the expression of which is affected by the presence of insertion sequences above blaCHDL genes. A study of strains isolated in a Warsaw hospital between 2009 and 2014 confirmed the prevalence of the above resistance mechanisms in Polish clinical isolates [83]. In a recent study, all strains from patients hospitalised in the vascular surgery department in Kraków (SSI – surgical site infections, from surgical site infections and from wounds) were found to be XDR, resistant to carbapenems. All of them possessed blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24 and blaOXA-51 genes and all of them produced less abundant biofilm in comparison to the reference strain ATCC19606 [87].

In Poland, about 22% of patients are hospitalized in the ICU for sepsis and septic shock, and the mortality rate in this group reaches as high as 46%. In 2015, it was found that Gram-negative bacteria were responsible for 58% of sepsis cases, among which the fourth most commonly isolated group were rods of the genus Acinetobacter [49]. In a similar study conducted in Bosnia and Herzegovina, A. baumannii was found to cause 4.5% of sepsis cases [82]. In addition, recent observations in ICUs in Greece showed that nearly 42% of patients with XDR-resistant A. baumannii infection developed sepsis caused by strains resistant to colistin (an antibiotic of last resort), leading to septic shock; mortality in this group was 100%. In contrast, among patients with bloodstream infection with colistin-susceptible strains, 50% survived [71]. Furthermore, it has been reported that A. baumannii can coexist unhindered in the same niches with other bacteria (e.g. with S. aureus), which may worsen the course of infection [13].

5. Virulence factors

The ability to move, adhere to the colonized surface and create a biofilm are The most important factors in the pathogenesis of A. baumannii. This bacterium is motile in response to iron chelation. Iron deficiency is a universal signal to the bacteria that they are inside the host, which they react to with increased expression of virulence factors. Iron concentration influences the expression of the pil and com genes, which enable cell movement [26]. Quorum sensing is also a factor that controls mobility, as evidenced by reduced mobility as a result of inactivation of the abaI gene encoding the inducer synthetase of this system [18]. Light, especially blue light, is another inducer of A. baumannii motion, but this mechanism has not yet been fully elucidated [65].

The ability to colonize the surface of the skin or mucous membranes of the host organism is key to the invasiveness of this pathogen. It have been described in vitro two types of adhesion of A. baumannii to bronchial epithelial cells: adhesion to the host cell in diffuse form and adhesion of bacterial aggregates in localized areas of the cell. Bacteria interacted with epithelial cells through fimbriae. The particular strains differed in terms of quantity, but no correlation was found between the number of bacteria colonizing the epithelium and the origin of the strain. However, it was observed in the context of a clonal line – clone II (European clonal type) to be much more adherent than clone I [51].

Adherence to biotic and abiotic surfaces enables the development of biofilms. The production of biofilm is also an important factor increasing the tolerance of bacteria to antimicrobial agents [77]. For the formation of biofilms on abiotic surfaces, it is necessary to synthesize pilus by genes of the CsuA/BABCDE system, conditioning the synthesis of fimbriae and OmpA protein. In addition, the conserved Bap protein is also important, as it seems to be essential for communication between biofilm-forming bacterial cells, and mutations of the genes encoding them result in a weakening of adherent abilities, inhibiting the growth of the structure. The development of biofilm also depends on the ability of clinical strains to produce and secrete exopolysaccharide poly-β-1-6-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) [54, 67]. It was found that A. baumannii grows faster under the influence of the stress factor of nutrient deficiency. A significant reduction in the expression of genes active during biofilm formation (ompA, bfmR, csuAB) was observed. This means that the pressure in the form of nutrient deficiency reduces adhesion to solid surfaces, but also reduces biofilm formation, and thus the colonization of abiotic surfaces [9].

A capsule gives A. baumannii the ability to avoid immune reactions (the complement system and phagocytosis). It can modify the structure of phosphoethanolamine of the capsular lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It is the main component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. This lipid-polysaccharide heteropolymer is composed of endotoxic lipid A, an oligosaccharide core and an O antigen. Lipopolysaccharide is an immunoreactive molecule because it induces the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 8 (IL-8) in a TLR-4 (Toll-like receptor 4) dependent manner [50]. LPS therefore plays an important role in the virulence of A. baumannii cells. It has been described that the deletion mutation of LpsB glycosyltransferase, which plays a role in LPS biosynthesis, reduces the pathogenicity of strains during soft tissue infection [55, 61]. Also, inhibition of the enzyme UDP-3-O-acyl-N-acetylglucosamine deacylase by the LpxC gene encoded, resulted in decreased TLR-4 activation, decreased inflammation and increased phagocyte activity and most importantly, increased survival of infected mice [53]. Stimulation of host TLR-4 receptors by LPS is of key importance in development of sepsis. During septic shock, LPS also impairs the host’s immune system and its ability to reduce infection by a mechanism known as immunoparalysis or reprogramming of the immune system. The occurrence of immunoparalysis during sepsis impairs the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in monocytes, disturbs phagocytic potential of neutrophils, causes T-lymphocyte anergy and even their apoptosis. Therefore, it may be potentially beneficial to implement a therapy that strengthens the host’s immune system and allows it to inhibit the excessive multiplication of bacteria at the very beginning of the infection [50, 100].

Iron uptake systems, including siderophores also contribute to virulence. Iron, although it is quite ubiquitous in the environment, is inaccessible to cells mainly due to heme chelation and iron-binding proteins such as lactoferrin. Most aerobic bacteria, including A. baumannii, obtain irons using siderophores in an environment with limited access to iron. The best characterized siderophore is acinetobactin [50]. The acinetobactin-mediated system plays a key role in the ability of the ATCC 19606T reference strain to colonize, damage epithelial cells and kill infected laboratory animals. This suggests that the ability to extract iron from the environment plays a key role in virulence [31]. With the limited availability of iron, the development of bacterial cells, which do not express genes encoding acinetobactin, is possible thanks to siderophores – baumannoferrins A and B [73]. In addition, A. baumannii also captures and uses heme, which is a product of host metabolism, especially present in damaged cells and tissues with infection (such as necrotizing fasciitis) [19, 102]. Moreover, this bacterium can bind zinc [66].

Among the virulence factors there are porins, mainly the OmpA protein – a transmembrane protein of the outer membrane. This protein is associated with the outer membrane vesicles system (OMV), which includes the outer membrane, periplasmic proteins, phospholipids and LPS. OMVs transfer virulence factors (including OmpA) into host cells [50]. Lee et al. reported that the mechanism by which A. baumannii causes damage to human respiratory cells during infection is the induction of apoptosis [51]. In addition, OMVs also take part in the horizontal transfer of the OXA-24 carbapenemase gene, which proves the possibility of OMV’s participation in the spread of antib iotic resistance among strains [50]. OmpA, apart from its cytotoxic properties and the ability to bind factor H of the complement system, plays a significant role in the colonization of the lung epithelium – It promotes adhesion to proteins of the extracellular matrix, including fibronectin [63].

Among the protein secretion systems that contribute to the pathogenesis of A. baumannii, in addition to OMV, type II (T2SS), V (auto-transporters) and VI (T6SS) secretion systems should be mentioned [63, 73, 81, 96]. The type II secretion system is involved in the transfer of proteins from the periplasmic space to the extracellular environment. This process is a two-step process. First, target proteins are transferred to the periplasm by the Sec or Tat system, from where proteins are sequentially secreted out of the cell by T2SS [96]. It has been observed that deletion of the gspD or gspE genes of the T2SS system results in an inability to secrete LipA lipase, which is a substrate for T2SS. This in turn results in the inability of strains to grow in the presence of long-chain fatty acids as the sole carbon source. Inactivation of the T2SS system and its substrate, LipA, also has a negative effect on bacterial survival in vivo in a neutropenic mouse model of bacteraemia [45].

Another virulence factor is the type VI secretion system (T6SS), which is used by many bacteria to introduce effector proteins during infection of eukaryotic cells or to eliminate competing bacteria [7, 96]. Although T6SS appears to contribute significantly to the virulence of A. baumannii in a strain-specific manner, its role has not been determined in all strains tested. This system mediates the secretion of various effector proteins, including proteins that are toxic to other bacteria, enabling the killing of competing bacteria [12, 76]. Interestingly, some strains have found an association between T6SS and antibiotic resistance. The large, conjugating plasmids (pAB04-1 or pAB3) confer resistance to many antibiotics but also encode a T6SS inhibitor. Therefore, there is great pressure leading to the loss of these plasmids in some cells [97].

The V-type secretion system (T5SS) also called autotransporter uses the Sec system to transport proteins out of the inner cell membrane. This system is known to mediate biofilm formation and adhesion to extracellular matrix components. Moreover, it participates in obtaining virulence, which was tested in a murine model of systemic A. baumannii infection [27].

Another important factor in A. baumannii virulence is phospholipase. This enzyme, by metabolizing phospholipids present in mucous membranes, reduces the stability of the host cell membranes and lyses eukaryotic membrane cells thus facilitating invasion [86]. There are three classes of phospholipases: phospholipase A, phospholipase C and phospholipase D, differing in the phospholipid hydrolysis site, where phospholipase A is not mentioned as the virulence factor of A. baumannii [11, 44, 86]. Active phospholipase D contributes to the increase in the ability of A. baumannii infection to spread from the lungs to other organs, which has been demonstrated in a mouse model of pneumonia [3].

Although penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) in microorganisms are mainly involved in the final steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, the PBP6/8 protein, encoded by the pbpG gene, is the virulence factor of A. baumannii. The strain which mutated the pbpG gene was characterized by lower survival in the rat model of soft tissue infection and pneumonia [50].

Sex-related differences in susceptibility to certain strains of A. baumannii have been described in a mouse model. In the blood infection model, female mice were found to be approximately twice as susceptible to the hypervirulent colistin-resistant strain (LAC-4 ColR obtained by spontaneous mutation) than male mice, but more than 10 times more resistant in the lung infection model to another strain (VA-AB41, isolated from lung and skin) [56]. The female hormone 17β-estradiol has been shown to be responsible for changes in pulmonary macrophage and neutrophil populations, resulting in an enhanced inflammatory response and impaired eradication of the pathogen [74]. Studies conducted in an insect model (larvae of Galleria mellonella) revealed the activity of 300 genes active during in vivo infection – genes that are both well understood and those that have not been characterized so far [34].

The host defense mechanisms against A. baumannii are being elucidated more and more thoroughly. The recently described role of the inflammasome in inducing an early response against A. baumannii infection is worth mentioning. Inflamasome is a large intracellular complex of proteins involved in the activation of the pro-inflammatory cascade. It has been shown that although the NLRP3 inflammasome is essential for effective infection control, the clinical strain of A. baumannii 8879 with the XDR phenotype, belonging to clone II (which causes bacteremia in ICU burn wound patients), induces increased production of IL-1β and IL-18 cytokines via the NLRP3 inflammasome and induces lung damage. Undoubtedly, further research on the significance of the activation of this pathway by A. baumannii is necessary [22]. A graphic summary of the most important factors of pathogenesis and their mechanisms of action is presented in Figure 2.

Fig. 2.

Virulence factors of Acinetobacter baumannii and their role in pathogenesis.

10.21307_PM-2021.60.4.21-f002.jpg

6. Infection control

The increase of resistance of A. baumannii to antimicrobials leaves few therapeutic options. Unfortunately, there are no effective treatment regimens for infection caused by multidrug resistant strains of A. baumannii. The lack of large prospective clinical trials makes it difficult to evaluate combination therapy in infections with MDR strains. Most of the available data on the efficacy of individual treatments are derived from case series (out of control), clinical observations, in vitro studies and animal models. Various studies show contradicting results for the same combinations of antimicrobial agents [10, 28].

Carbapenems are usually the first-line drugs in the treatment of infections caused by MDR strains. However, nearly half of the strains isolated from people with healthcare-associated infections reported to the CDC National Healthcare Safety Network in 2014 turned out to be CRAB strains [10]. Other β-lactam antibiotics, including broad-spectrum cephalosporins (ceftazidime or cefepime) are also used to combat infections caused by A. baumannii. The β-lactamase inhibitor sulbactam shows high bactericidal activity against A. baumannii isolates. However, as reported by Kanafani et al., even resistant to carbapenems strains may be in vitro susceptibility to this compound [46]. Aminoglycosides such as tobramycin and amikacin are also used in the treatment of MDR A. baumannii infection. These antibiotics are mainly used in combination with antibiotics belonging to other groups. However, numerous multidrug-resistant isolates remain indirectly sensitive to this group of drugs [28].

Therapeutic options are limited in the case of resistance to the above antimicrobial agents. In such situations, polymyxins (colistin and polymyxin B – not used clinically) and tetracyclines (especially minocycline and tigecycline) are used as the last-line drugs. There are no randomized studies on their effectiveness, mainly because they are reserved for use against microorganisms with high resistance. However, it is known that colistin exhibits significant nephro- and neurotoxicity. Observational studies have reported 57–77% of cure or improvement in health following the use of colistin in seriously ill patients with MDR infections (including pneumonia, bacteremia, intra-abdominal infection, and central nervous system (CNS) infection). During in vitro studies, both polymyxins exhibit the highest antimicrobial activity and, although they are toxic to the kidneys, are often used as rescue drugs [28, 33].

Also APIC (Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology) emphasizes the role of controlling Ab-MDR outbreak infection and limiting strain transmission. The methods of control include communication between health care facilities where resides an infected patient. Each medical center should document the Ab-MDR development in a patient. However, the basic principle of epidemic control is the identification of the reservoir of strains and its elimination (decontamination of medical equipment, including a ventilator). In addition, APIC also mentions educating not only medical staff about how strains are transmitted, but also visitors. It is also important to cohort people colonized or infected with Ab-MDR and their medical caregivers [5]. In the case of outbreaks infection, admitting new patients to a given medical facility should be limited. In the process of extinguishing an epidemic, staff education, scrupulous hand hygiene and decontamination of the hospital environment are extremely important [99].

Resistance of A. baumannii strains to carbapenems in some parts of the world exceeds 90%, and the death rate for the most common CRAB infections, i.e. nosocomial pneumonia (HAP) and bloodstream infections, may approach 60%. The antimicrobial drugs currently used in the treatment of CRAB infections (ie polymyxins, tigecycline, and sometimes aminoglycosides) are far from perfect due to their pharmacokinetic properties and increasing rates of resistance [42]. Therefore, given the lack of good therapeutic options, it is essential to develop new therapies as well as conduct clinical trials to develop and apply an effective treatment regimen. Until then, it is essential to prevent the transfer of A. baumannii strains in healthcare settings.

New treatments for A. baumannii infection are based on new antibiotics with specific activity against the bacteria: new inhibitors of β-lactamases combined with an antibiotic or inhibitors of protein synthesis in ribosomes (pyrolocytosine antibiotic RX-P873 with great potential against clinical isolates of A. baumannii). Another approach is new modifications of existing antibiotics (e.g. siderophore-conjugated cephalosporins). An example of a siderophore cephalosporin is cefiderocolol. Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) may have a similar effect by disrupting the functioning of bacterial membranes. Proline-rich A3-APO as example of AMP is isolated from the skin of frogs and toads, showing high bactericidal potential in preclinical models of blood and wound infections. Another perspective is the phage therapies that are currently experiencing a renaissance. Since 2010, phages specific to A. baumannii (the first: AB1 and AB2) have been identified that lyse this species or representatives of this genus. Noteworthy is the AP22 phage isolated in 2012, showing the broadest activity against clinical strains of A. baumannii (fighting 68% of hospital isolates) [30, 32, 100]. Species specific phages can also be useful in decontaminating rooms where patients are present. In 2013, Taiwan tested for the first time the effect of incorporating an aerosol containing active bacteriophages (8 strains) against CRAB into the standard procedure for decontaminating hospital rooms at the ICU. During the 8-month period of the study, a decrease in the number of CRAB isolates by 41.69% was observed, as well as an increase in the number of carbapenem-sensitive strains (probably due to the targeting of the phages tested against CRAB strains) [32, 40]. The significant potential of phages to decolonize and interfere with the formation of biofilm by A. baumannii (phages AB7-IBBI, AB7-ABB2) was confirmed. An interesting possibility are also lytic peptides isolated from these phages – e.g. LysSS endolysin. In a study from 2020, inhibition of the development of MDR A. baumannii strains was shown, but it was not found to be cytotoxic to human cells (in the study on the human lung A549 cell line) [47]. Some researchers turn to more traditional methods, such as essential oils known since ancient times. They show very different effectiveness, depending on the bacterial strain and the plant from which they were isolated. These substances are unlikely to be effective enough to be used alone, but may be a useful adjunct to antibiotic therapy. A completely different approach is suggested by the work on phototherapy. This solution would be based on the local production of reactive oxygen species, but it would carry the risk of damaging nearby tissues. Vaccination (preventive and therapeutic) against Acinetobacter infections is another strategy. The difficulty is that there are around 40 serotypes among the A. baumannii strains, which would require vaccines to be multivalent. The most promising targets seem to be the OmpA protein and the conserved NucAb nuclease. However, in clinical practice, passive immunization, which consists in administering readymade antibodies to the patient, might be more useful. It is therefore important to develop a monoclonal antibody (or antibody mixture) that can inactivate more than 90% of A. baumannii isolates. Another potential therapeutic option is to trap or mask metal ions (Fe, Zn), as limiting the availability of these ions inhibits bacterial growth. However, it should be borne in mind that this type of therapy could turn out to be a double-edged sword, due to the above-described effect of metal deficiency on virulence [42, 57, 75, 79, 100]. Improving the outlook for the control of A. baumannii is associated with a better understanding of the mechanisms of virulence and resistance of this species to antibiotics [6, 15].

7. Summary

A. baumannii is Gram-negative bacteria widely distributed in the environment. They are easily isolated from wet areas, but they are also able to survive on dry surfaces. As opportunistic pathogens, they are often a component of the physiological microbiota of animals and humans. Due to the special ability of A. baumannii to survive adverse conditions, exceptional durability, natural resistance to many groups of antibiotics, the ability to quickly acquire and develop a variety of resistance mechanisms, the narrowing range of drugs that can be used in therapy and the increasing number of isolates resistant to carbapenems these bacteria are a serious cause for concern and the intensified search for effective treatments.

1. Wstęp

Gram-ujemna pałeczka Acinetobacter baumannii to oportunistyczny patogen, posiadający potencjał epidemiczny i przyczyniający się do ognisk infekcji na całym świecie. Pałeczki A. baumannii są czynnikami etiologicznymi przede wszystkim zakażeń dolnych dróg oddechowych u pacjentów wentylowanych mechanicznie, zakażeń krwi oraz zakażeń ran w szpitalach polowych. Narastająca lekooporność, wysoka śmiertelność wśród pacjentów zakażonych tym patogenem i trudność w leczeniu infekcji spowodowała wpisanie tego patogenu przez Światową Organizację Zdrowia (World Health Organization, WHO) na listę patogenów stanowiących największe wyzwanie obecnej dekady.

2. Charakterystyka i taksonomia

W 1911 roku mikrobiolog Martinus Beijerinck, wykorzystując pożywkę wzbogaconą o octan wapnia, wyizolował z gleby mikroorganizm, który nazwał Micrococcus calcoaceticus. Brak dokładnej charakterystyki spowodował nadanie nowej nazwy gatunkowi znanemu już jako Bacterium anitratum oraz Moraxella lwoffii var. glucidolytica – później M. glucidolytica. W 1953 roku Jean Brisou zaproponował włączenie M. glucidolytica do rodzaju Achromobacter, lecz rok później wraz z Andre-Romainem Prevotem doszedł do wniosku, że w celu odróżnienia ich od ruchliwych przedstawicieli Achromobacter warto utworzyć nowy takson, proponując nazwę Acinetobacter (akinetos – niezdolny do ruchu, bactrum – pałeczka). W 1968 zespół Paula Baumanna stwierdził ostatecznie, że powyższe taksony (wówczas uznawane za rozdzielne) należą do jednego rodzaju – Acinetobacter, co trzy lata później zostało sformalizowane decyzją Podkomisji do spraw Taksonomii Moraxella i Pokrewnych Bakterii [38, 52]. Ostateczna nazwa drobnoustroju – Acinetobacter baumannii, została nadana, aby uhonorować dwoje amerykańskich bakteriologów: Paula i Lindę Baumannów [39]. W latach 70. XX wieku uznano A. baumannii za patogen oportunistyczny. Początkowo do rodzaju Acinetobacter zaliczono dwa gatunki: A. lwoffii oraz A. calcoaceticus [72]. W 2015 roku rodzaj Acinetobacter obejmował 33 gatunki [21]. Obecnie w jego skład wchodzi ponad 50 gatunków, wśród których większość to gatunki środowiskowe [100]. Rodzaj Acinetobacter zaliczany jest do gamma-proteobakterii (nazwa ta nawiązuje do Proteusa – greckiego bożka potrafiącego zmieniać postać) [62]. Aktualną pozycję taksonomiczną gatunku A. baumannii przedstawiono na ryc. 1.

Ryc. 1.

Taksonomia gatunku Acinetobacter baumannii

Na podstawie Szewczyk i wsp. [88].

10.21307_PM-2021.60.4.21-f003.jpg

Bakterie te są owalnymi, prawie kulistymi Gram-ujemnymi pałeczkami, czasem tworzącymi układy dwoinkowe. Mimo swej nazwy wskazującej na brak ruchliwości, pałeczka ta ma zdolność do ruchu. Organizmy te są oksydazo-ujemnymi bezwzględnymi tlenowcami, w obrębie których można rozróżnić gatunki zdolne do utleniania glukozy (A. baumannii) oraz niezdolne do tego procesu (A. lwoffii, A. haemolyticus) [64, 88].

Ze względu na wysokie podobieństwo fenotypowe, a tym samym trudności z rozróżnieniem sześciu gatunków z rodzaju Acinetobacter: A. calcoaceticus, A. nosocomialis, A. pittii, A. seifertii, A. lactucae (A. dijkshoorniae) oraz A. baumannii, utworzono dla nich grupę A. calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) kompleks [24, 68]. Gatunkiem z rodzaju Acinetobacter najczęściej wywołującym infekcje u ludzi jest A. baumannii, A. calcoaceticus plasuje się na miejscu drugim, zaś A. lwoffii na trzecim. Pozostałe gatunki Acinetobacter również mogą stanowić czynnik etiologiczny zakażeń, jednak znacznie rzadziej w porównaniu do powyższych trzech. Wyjątek stanowi A. seifertii (genetycznie blisko spokrewniony z A. baumannii), będący najczęstszą przyczyną zakażeń w Azji [100].

W obrębie rodzaju Acinetobacter, a zwłaszcza u A. baumannii, występują szczepy naturalnie kompetentne, tj. zdolne w warunkach naturalnych do pobierania DNA z otaczającego je środowiska w celu ewentualnego wykorzystania wolnych kwasów nukleinowych jako substratów do naprawy własnego materiału genetycznego bądź włączenia nowych fragmentów w obręb genomu. Proces nabywania nowych i modyfikacji już posiadanych cech jest uwarunkowany genetycznie i wymaga uczestnictwa produktów kilkunastu genów. Bakterie mogą też stosować pewien rodzaj drapieżnictwa, polegający na doprowadzaniu do śmierci znajdujących się w pobliżu komórek, przynależących do niespokrewnionych gatunków w celu wzbogacenia puli genowej [91, 93]. Przykładowo A. baumannii potrafi doprowadzić do lizy komórki K. pneumoniae czy S. aureus, a następnie zintegrować pochodzące od nich fragmenty DNA z własnym genomem, co umożliwiło badanym szczepom nabycie oporności na środki przeciwdrobnoustrojowe (β-laktamy, w tym karbapenemy) [91]. Naturalna transformacja istotnie wpływa na plastyczność genomu A. baumannii, a w rezultacie sprzyja pojawianiu się szczepów opornych na wiele leków. Warto podkreślić, że u A. baumannii dominuje tendencja do pozyskiwania niekodujących fragmentów DNA, zamiast sekwencji kodujących, co zwiększa pulę ruchomych elementów genetycznych, a ponadto stwierdzono, że preferowanym źródłem materiału genetycznego dla tej pałeczki jest DNA innych bakterii Gram-ujemnych [91, 93]. Dodatkowo, związki chemiczne zanieczyszczające środowisko mogą zwiększać potencjał komórek bakteryjnych do pobierania obcego DNA. Mechanizm molekularny tego zjawiska polega na wzmaganiu ekspresji genu recA (kodującego czynnik rekombinacji homologicznej) przez związki o potencjale mutagennym, co zwiększa (nawet dwukrotnie) częstotliwość integracji pobranego DNA z chromosomem, a tym samym wydajność transformacji genomowego DNA. Tym sposobem np. powszechnie stosowane chlorowanie wody, mające na celu zwiększenie bezpieczeństwa wody pitnej, może przyczynić się do wzrostu wydajności transformacji, a co za tym idzie do powstania nowego, potencjalnie niebezpiecznego szczepu [59]. Mechanizm ten może dodatkowo zwiększać wydajność koselekcji, zjawiska istotnie przyczyniającego się do wzrostu antybiotykooporności u szczepów bytujących w środowiskach zanieczyszczonych w szczególności metalami ciężkimi [36].

W 2014 roku stwierdzono, że w genomie tej pałeczki sekwencje zidentyfikowane jako umiarkowane fagi są liczniejsze niż elementy koniugacyjne, co podkreśla ich istotną rolę jako wektorów horyzontalnego transferu genów. Dodatkowo zaobserwowano obecność złożonych, zmiennych systemów CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) w genomie Acinetobacter. Zebrane dane doprowadziły do sformułowania hipotezy, że obecna populacja A. baumannii mogła wyewoluować z pierwotnej, niewielkiej populacji tego gatunku w wyniku selekcji negatywnej [90].

3. Występowanie i warunki hodowli

Bakterie z rodzaju Acinetobacter to szeroko rozprzestrzenione saprofity, występujące na terenach podmokłych, w wilgotnej glebie, w stawach, ściekach, stacjach uzdatniania wody, w zbiornikach do hodowli ryb, a także w wodzie morskiej. Ponieważ w przyrodzie występują powszechnie w glebie i wodzie, ich izolacja jest stosunkowo łatwa. W laboratorium można otrzymać czystą hodowlę stosując podłoża wzbogacone octanem do zawartości 0,2% przy pH 5,5–6,0. Bakterie te są jednymi z dominujących w glebach tundry, a także należą do składowych mikrobioty warstwy tlenowej jezior słonych czy solanek. Ponadto mogą występować również w powietrzu (wykryto je np. w kurzu w czasie burzy piaskowej). Co istotne, w aerozolach powietrza okolic składowisk odpadów, kompostowni czy oczyszczalni ścieków, a także w pomieszczeniach biurowych pałeczki Acinetobacter spp. dominują ilościowo nad innymi rodzajami [8].

Wykazano, że dodatek etanolu do podłoża wzmaga wzrost A. baumannii, a także zwiększa tolerancję tego drobnoustroju na zasolenie, dzięki czemu w obecności alkoholu etylowego (działającego jako cząsteczka sygnałowa) bakteria ta może przetrwać hamujące jej wzrost w normalnych warunkach stężenia soli. Z tego powodu również wspólna hodowla z drożdżami Saccharomyces cerevisiae wydzielającymi do podłoża etanol wzmaga wzrost tej bakterii. Obecność tego związku wpływa na indukcję białek A. baumannii, m.in. zaangażowanych w anabolizm lipidów i węglowodanów, co nasila wytwarzanie biofilmu i zmniejsza ruchliwość bakterii. Obecność etanolu indukuje także produkcję kwasu indolilo-3-octowego (IAA), będącego hormonem roślinnym wzmagającym tolerancję roślin na obecność bakterii. Traktowane tym alkoholem A. baumannii wykazują się zwiększoną patogennością w modelu infekcji nicieni. Należy podkreślić, że u ludzi etanol predysponuje organizm do infekcji A. baumannii, sprzyjając adaptacji i przetrwaniu tego patogenu [69, 84].

Bakterie z gatunku A. baumannii posiadają duże zdolności przystosowawcze, co umożliwia im zasiedlanie środowisk szpitalnych. Zamieszkują tam nie tylko powierzchnie wilgotne (np. układy oddechowe respiratorów), ale także suche (np. sprzęt medyczny), co jest cechą nietypową u pałeczek Gram-ujemnych [1]. Wchodzą w skład fizjologicznej stałej lub przejściowej mikrobioty (skóry, błon śluzowych dróg oddechowych i moczowo-płciowych czy jelita grubego) zarówno pacjentów, jak i personelu medycznego [58].

Ciekawostką jest, że podczas montażu lądownika Mars Phoenix wyizolowano kilka szczepów Acinetobacter opornych na nadtlenek wodoru. Analiza proteomiczna ujawniła obecność katalazy oraz alkilowej reduktazy wodorotlenkowej. Ze względu na tak wysoką wytrzymałość z prawdopodobnie niezbędne będzie zaliczenie przedstawicieli tego rodzaju do obciążenia biologicznego statków kosmicznych podczas misji mających wykryć ślady życia poza naszą planetą [20].

4. Epidemiologia

Co niezwykle istotne z medycznego punktu widzenia, A. baumannii należy do najczęstszych patogenów wielolekoopornych (MDR, multidrug resistant), opornych na szeroką gamę leków (XDR, extensively drug resistant), a nawet opornych na wszystkie dostępne preparaty (PDR, pandrug-resistant), które są coraz częściej przyczynami infekcji wewnątrzszpitalnych [70]. Badania nad czynnikami etiologicznymi w oddziałach intensywnej terapii na pięciu kontynentach z 2007 roku wykazały, że A. baumannii był piątym patogenem pod względem częstości występowania [94]. W Europie jest on trzecim w kolejności patogenem powodującym zapaleniach płuc związane z wentylacją mechaniczną (VAP), tuż po S. aureus i P. aeruginosa [48]. Szczególnym zagrożeniem dla pacjentów jest bakteryjne zapalenie płuc na oddziałach intensywnej terapii (OIT) [33].

Do rozwoju VAP dochodzi średnio u co piątego pacjenta (od 8 do 28%) wentylowanego mechanicznie. Śmiertelność w tej grupie chorych jest szczególnie wysoka i wynosi od 24% do aż 50%, a niekiedy może osiągnąć nawet 76% [16, 41]. Szacuje się, że każdego roku infekcje A. baumannii powodują około 15 tysięcy zgonów [85]. Głównymi czynnikami etiologicznymi szpitalnych zakażeń płuc są S. aureus, Enterobacteriaceae, P. aeruginosa oraz właśnie A. baumannii, przy czym rodzaj czynnika zależy zarówno od czasu pobytu pacjenta w szpitalu, jak też zastosowanego wcześniej leczenia przeciwdrobnoustrojowego. Należy podkreślić, że VAP wywołane przez P. aeruginosa i Acinetobacter spp. rozwinęło się u aż 65% pacjentów, których w ciągu dwóch tygodni poprzedzających zakażenie poddano terapii antybiotykiem o szerokim spektrum działania i jedynie u 19% tych, u których takiej terapii nie zastosowano [16, 41]. Ryzyko nabycia VAP związanego z Acinetobacter spp. wzrasta też w obecności nadciśnienia tętniczego (40%), przewlekłej obturacyjnej choroby płuc (28%), cukrzycy (23%), oraz procedur inwazyjnych: cewników moczowych (99%), centralnych cewników naczyniowych (głównie szyjnych i podobojczykowych) (83%), czy sond nosowo-żołądkowych (74%) [29].

W badaniu dotyczącym bakteryjnych zakażeń krwi (BSI) w 16 szpitalach w południowej Polsce w latach 2016–2019 stwierdzono, że bakterie Gram-ujemne odpowiadały za 27,8% przypadków BSI, spośród których oporny na karbapenemy A. baumannii odpowiedzialny był za 70,6% zakażeń na OIT. Pałeczka ta była obecna na oddziałach chirurgii we wszystkich 16 szpitalach [17]. Badania epidemiologiczne w Polsce i na Ukrainie pod kątem wywoływania VAP wykazały zróżnicowaną częstość występowania poszczególnych gatunków. Stwierdzono za to jednoznacznie, że jako czynniki etiologiczne tej jednostki chorobowej dominują bakterie Gram-ujemne. Co istotne, szczepy MDR A. baumannii okazały się znacznie częściej izolowane w Polsce (26,9%) niż na Ukrainie (14,6%), co może wynikać z różnic w strategii stosowania antybiotyków w obu krajach [37]. Ciężkie zakażenia MDR A. baumannii wiążą się z wysoką śmiertelnością, sięgającą 70% w VAP oraz 43% w przypadku zakażeń krwi. W odpowiedzi na narastający problem antybiotykooporności, rząd brytyjski w 2014 roku ogłosił, że niezahamowanie nadmiernego użycia antybiotyków spowoduje do 2050 roku 10 milionów zgonów rocznie z powodu infekcji bakteriami, a to więcej niż z powodu nowotworów, które odpowiadają za 8,2 miliony zgonów rocznie [70].

Bakteria A. baumannii, razem z Enterobacter spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecium i Escherichia coli, należy do patogenów wielolekoopornych, które Amerykańskie Towarzystwo Chorób Zakaźnych określiło akromimem ESKAPEE. Akronim ten oznacza „ucieczkę” (ang. escape), co nawiązuje do szczególnej oporności tych bakterii na skierowane przeciwko nim, dostępne obecnie antybiotyki [77, 78]. W 2017 roku WHO umieściła A. baumannii na liście patogenów antybiotykoopornych, dla których znalezienie skutecznych terapii przeciwdrobnoustrojowych uważa się za priorytetowe – A. baumannii oporny na karbapenemy został uznany za jeden z trzech patogenów o znaczeniu krytycznym [56, 89].

Bakteria A. baumannii to jeden z najczęściej izolowanych patogenów wśród pacjentów OIT. Za taki stan rzeczy odpowiadają szczególne cechy tego drobnoustroju, takie jak jego wysoka zdolność do akumulacji różnorodnych mechanizmów oporności (w wyniku mutacji oraz nabywania plazmidów, transpozonów, integronów, wysp oporności) oraz zdolność do przetrwania w niekorzystnych warunkach środowiskowych (przesuszenie, kontakt ze środkami dezynfekcyjnymi), a także wytwarzanie biofilmu.

Szacuje się też, że rocznie dochodzi do ok. miliona zakażeń A. baumannii na świecie, w tym ok. 45 000 w USA, z czego połowa wywoływana jest szczepami opornymi na karbapenemy, powodując śmiertelność a poziomie blisko 20% [85]. Problem narastania lekooporności szczepów A. baumannii jest ogromny; jeden z raportów wskazuje, że w sumie na całym świecie w 2004 roku 23% izolatów klinicznych A. baumannii wykazywało się wielolekoopornością, zaś w 2014 roku było to już 63% [35]. Infekcje wywoływane przez szczepy XDR charakteryzują się bardzo wysokim współczynnikiem śmiertelności sięgającym 70%, a w przypadku szczepów XDR wykazujących oporność na karbapenemy – nawet 88% [6]. Szczepy A. baumannii oporne na karbapenemy (CRAB, carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii) są obecnie przyczyną bardzo poważnych zakażeń szpitalnych, szczególnie w OIT. Za jeszcze większy problem uważa się wzrost liczby szczepów opornych na kolistynę (ABCR, A. baumannii colistin-resistant), będącą tzw. antybiotykiem ostatniego rzutu. Śmiertelność wśród pacjentów zakażonych szczepami ABCR wynosi około 85% i jest ponad dwukrotnie wyższa niż w przypadku infekcji szczepami wrażliwymi na ten antybiotyk [60].

WHO w 2017 roku podała, że w latach 2011–2014 w USA za infekcje związane z opieką zdrowotną odpowiedzialne było 45–65% szczepów A. baumannii opornych na karbapenemy oraz 40–70% szczepów MDR [85]. Wśród nielicznych krajów, które prowadzą nadzór nad występowaniem infekcji A. baumannii w społeczeństwie, znajdują się Stany Zjednoczone. Amerykańskie Centrum Kontroli i Zapobiegania Chorobom (CDC, Center for Disease Control and Prevention) podało w raporcie w 2013 roku, że szczepy MDR A. baumannii powodują rocznie w USA około 7 000 infekcji, co odpowiada około 10% wszystkich zakażeń szpitalnych w tym kraju, z czego 500 kończy się zgonami [14l]. Nadzór taki prowadzony jest także w Anglii przez Public Health England, jednak w węższym zakresie – dotyczy tylko zakażeń krwi.

Pałeczki A. baumannii często są izolowane z próbek moczu, krwi, płynu mózgowo-rdzeniowego czy z ran pooperacyjnych pacjentów z zakażeniem szpitalnym. U niektórych pacjentów A. baumannii stanowi część naturalnej mikrobioty błon śluzowych i w odpowiednich warunkach może wywołać zakażenia ran, dróg oddechowych, moczowych (zakażenia odcewnikowe), otrzewnej czy opon mózgowo-rdzeniowych. Do grupy szczególnego ryzyka należą pacjenci krytycznie chorzy, wentylowani mechanicznie, po zabiegach chirurgicznych, osłabieni przedłużającą się hospitalizacją i związanym z tym leczeniem antybiotykami o szerokim spektrum działania [2, 28]. Głównym rezerwuarem szpitalnym A. baumannii są środowiska wilgotne: łazienki i kuchnie [43]. W odróżnieniu od wymienionych wyżej czynników ryzyka kolonizacji i zakażenia wielolekoopornymi A. baumannii nabytymi w szpitalu (hospital-acquired A. baumannii – HA-Ab), czynnikami ryzyka infekcji nabytych w społeczeństwie (community-acquired A. baumannii – CA-Ab) są: nadużywanie alkoholu, papierosów, klimat subtropikalny i tropikalny, ale też ogólny stan zdrowia, w tym niektóre choroby współistniejące takie jak cukrzyca czy przewlekłe choroby płuc. Wykazano, że ekspozycja makrofagów na działanie etanolu (w dawkach fizjologicznych, dostarczanych do organizmu przez osoby nadużywające alkoholu) znacząco zmniejsza zdolność komórek do fagocytozy (dawka 6,25 mmol/l o 23,4%, a 12,5 mmol/l o 51,7%). Efekt ten jest najprawdopodobniej wynikiem znacznego zmniejszenia ekspresji regulatora kaskady sygnalizacyjnej polimeryzacji aktyny (GTPazy-RhoA). Dodatkowo etanol inaktywuje syntazę NO, przez co zwiększa się przeżywalność A. baumannii w makrofagach. Ponadto alkohol modyfikuje produkcję cytokin (produkowanych głównie w komórkach nabłonkowych płuc), przez co znacząco zaostrza przebieg zakażeń [4]. Wśród pacjentów z zakażeniami CA-Ab w 2015 roku odnotowano śmiertelność wynoszącą aż 64%. Należy przy tym podkreślić, że trudno jest jednoznacznie stwierdzić, czy przyczyną tak wysokiego wskaźnika śmiertelności są jedynie cechy zjadliwości szczepów, czy też osłabiony organizm gospodarza [21, 101].

Również środowiskowe szczepy Acinetobacter bardzo często wytwarzają enzymy dające oporność na antybiotyki (np. karbapenemazy, beta-laktamazy o szerokim spektrum działania), co czyni je istotnym rezerwuarem antybiotykooporności w środowisku pozaszpitalnym [1]. Niestety A. baumannii staje się znaczącym czynnikiem etiologicznym chorób zwierząt. Do większości zakażeń tym patogenem dochodzi w klinikach weterynaryjnych, co powoduje takie choroby jak: pioderma psów, martwicze zapalenie powięzi u kotów, zakażenie dróg moczowych, zakrzepowe zapalenie żył koni i zakażenie dolnych dróg oddechowych, sepsa źrebiąt, zapalenie płuc u norek czy zmiany skórne u sokołów. Izolaty zwierzęce wykazują wysoką różnorodność genetyczną. Ponadto występują u nich inne typy sekwencyjne niż u ludzi. Wraz z transmisją bakterii zwierzęta mogą przyczyniać się do rozpowszechniania nowych karbapenemaz, a ryzyko takiej transmisji rośnie w przypadku zwierząt towarzyszących. Należy zauważyć, że bakterię tę identyfikuje się nie tylko u osobników chorych, ale również zdrowych, szczególnie na skórze psów. Nie można zatem wykluczyć, że zwierzęta mogą pełnić rolę rezerwuaru A. baumannii [80, 92].

W 2017 roku sprawdzono potencjalny rezerwuar A. baumannii u ptaków. Bakterie wyizolowano od różnych gatunków ptaków (kur – od 3%, gęsi – 8% i piskląt bociana białego – 25%). Zjadliwość uzyskanych szczepów okazała się porównywalna z tą obserwowaną u szczepów klinicznych. Analiza sekwencji bakterii ujawniła bliskie pokrewieństwo pomiędzy izolatem kurzym z Niemiec oraz ludzkim klinicznym z Chin, a także powiązania między izolatami zwierząt hodowlanych z ludzkimi klinicznymi związanymi z międzynarodowymi liniami klonalnymi. Izolaty bocianie wykazały podobieństwo do ludzkiego klinicznego z USA. Badanie sugeruje, że A. baumannii może być uznany za patogen odzwierzęcy, który dodatkowo może przenosić się na zwierzęta gospodarskie [98].

Całościowa ocena sytuacji epidemiologicznej w Polsce wciąż wymaga dalszych, szeroko zakrojonych badań. W roku 2018 raport Narodowego Instytutu Leków, opracowany w ramach Narodowego Programu Ochrony Antybiotyków (NPOA), podawał, że w niemal 32% hospitalizacji dochodziło do nabycia zakażeń w polskich OIT. Zapadalność na zapalenie płuc dotyczyła 50,7% zakażonych pacjentów (17% wszystkich hospitalizacji), zakażenie łożyska naczyniowego (w tym zakażenia odcewnikowe) 35,4% A. baumannii okazał się trzecim najczęstszym czynnikiem etiologicznym zapalenia płuc (13%, zaraz po P. aeruginosa – 25,5% i Klebsiella spp. – 22,8%) oraz szóstym w przypadku zakażeń łożyska naczyniowego (3,6%). Aż 61,8% wyizolowanych szczepów A. baumannii wykazywała oporność na karbapenemy [23].

Trwająca 6 lat obserwacja (2011–2016) na OIT w Szpitalu Uniwersyteckim we Wrocławiu wśród 2549 pacjentów, pokazała, że A. baumannii był odpowiedzialny za 31% zakażeń, przy czym 73,8% dotyczyło zapalenia płuc związanego ze sztuczną wentylacją. Odnotowano także wzrost zakażeń szpitalnych wywołanych przez A. baumannii na przestrzeni lat – w 2011 roku było to 16,5%, a w 2016 roku – 41%. Zbadane szczepy były wrażliwe na kolistynę, amikacynę, imipenem, meropenem i ciprofloksacynę odpowiednio w 100%, 10,7%, 12,3%, 11,5% i 2,4%, a wielolekoopornych szczepów było 98,36% [25]. Częstość występowania zakażeń A. baumannii była niższa w tym ośrodku niż w OIT Szpitala Klinicznego Śląskiego Uniwersytetu Medycznego w pierwszych 12 miesiącach jego funkcjonowania, gdzie wynosiła ona 38,8%.

Badania 234 pacjentów hospitalizowanych w Klinice Intensywnej Opieki Medycznej Pomorskiej Akademii Medycznej Samodzielnego Publicznego Szpitala Klinicznego nr 1 w Szczecinie wykazały, że najczęstszym czynnikiem etiologicznym były A. baumannii (18,6%) oraz P. aeruginosa (16,9%). Za zapalenie płuc najczęściej odpowiedzialny był A. baumannii – w 23,09%, natomiast za zapalenie otrzewnej – E. coli (20,3%); A. baumannii powodował 17,4% zakażeń. Retrospektywne badanie dorosłych pacjentów hospitalizowanych w OIT (2547 chorych) na terenie południowej Polski, biorących udział w wieloośrodkowym standaryzowanym programie kontroli zakażeń w latach 2013–2015, w ramach europejskiego system nadzoru nad zakażeniami szpitalnymi (Healthcare-associated Infections Surveillance Network – HAI-Net), pokazało, że A. baumannii był także dominującym czynnikiem etiologicznym wtórnych zakażeń krwi na OIT (34,5%). Spośród nich 78,8% szczepów wykazywała oporność na imipenem, 72,7% na meropenem i doripenem, a 57,6% na sulbaktam [95].

Głównym mechanizmem oporności szczepów klinicznych tej pałeczki na karbapenemy są karbapenemazy typu CHDL, na których ekspresję wpływa obecność sekwencji insercyjnych powyżej genów blaCHDL. Badanie szczepów wyizolowanych w jednym z warszawskich szpitali w latach 2009–2014 potwierdziło powszechność występowania powyższych mechanizmów oporności w polskich izolatach klinicznych [83]. W jednym z najnowszych badań wszystkie szczepy od pacjentów hospitalizowanych w oddziale chirurgii naczyniowej w Krakowie (SSI – surgical site infections, z zakażeń miejsc operowanych oraz z ran) okazały się XDR, oporne na karbapenemy. Wszystkie posiadały geny: blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24 i blaOXA-51 i wszystkie wytwarzały mniej obfity biofilm w stosunku do szczepu referencyjnego ATCC19606 [87].

W Polsce w OIT około 22% chorych jest hospitalizowanych z powodu sepsy i wstrząsu septycznego, a śmiertelność w tej grupie sięga aż 46%. W 2015 roku stwierdzono, że za 58% przypadków sepsy były odpowiedzialne bakterie Gram-ujemne, wśród których czwartą najczęściej izolowaną grupą były pałeczki z rodzaju Acinetobacter [49]. W podobnym badaniu przeprowadzonym na terenie Bośni i Hercegowiny A. baumannii okazał się przyczyną 4,5% przypadków sepsy [82]. Dodatkowo niedawne obserwacje prowadzone w OIT w Grecji pokazały, że u blisko 42% pacjentów, u których doszło do zakażenia A. baumannii o oporności XDR, rozwinęła się sepsa wywołana szczepami opornymi na kolistynę (antybiotyk ostatniego rzutu), prowadząc do wstrząsu septycznego; śmiertelność w tej grupie wyniosła 100%. Natomiast wśród pacjentów z zakażeniem krwi szczepami kolistynowrażliwymi przeżyło 50% osób [71]. Ponadto stwierdzono, że A. baumannii może bez przeszkód koegzystować w tych samych niszach z innymi bakteriami (np. ze S. aureus), co może pogarszać przebieg infekcji [13].

5. Czynniki wirulencji

Do najistotniejszych czynników patogenezy A. baumannii należą: zdolność do ruchu, adhezji do kolonizowanej powierzchni oraz tworzenia biofilmu. Bakteria ta wykazuje ruchliwość w odpowiedzi na chelatację żelaza. Deficyt żelaza jest uniwersalnym sygnałem dla bakterii wskazującym, że znalazły się wewnątrz żywiciela, na co reagują zwiększoną ekspresją czynników wirulencji. W przypadku A. baumannii stężenie żelaza wpływa na ekspresję genów pil oraz com, które umożliwiają ruch komórek [26]. Wyczuwanie liczebności (quorum sensing) także jest czynnikiem kontrolującym ruchliwość, czego dowodem jest zmniejszenie ruchliwości w wyniku inaktywacji genu abaI kodującego syntetazę induktora tego systemu [18]. Światło, zwłaszcza niebieskie, jest kolejnym induktorem ruchu A. baumannii, jednak mechanizm ten nie jest jeszcze w pełni wyjaśniony [65].

Kluczowa dla inwazyjności tego patogenu jest zdolność do kolonizacji powierzchni skóry czy błon śluzowych organizmu gospodarza. Opisano dwa typy adhezji A. baumannii do komórek nabłonka oskrzeli in vitro: przyleganie do komórki gospodarza w formie rozproszonej oraz przyleganie skupisk bakterii w zlokalizowanych obszarach komórki. Bakterie oddziaływały z komórkami nabłonkowymi poprzez fimbrie, przy czym w pierwszym przypadku były one dodatkowo zakleszczone przez wypukłości występujące na powierzchni tych komórek. Poszczególne szczepy różniły się między sobą pod względem ilościowym, jednak nie stwierdzono korelacji pomiędzy liczbą bakterii zasiedlających nabłonek a pochodzeniem szczepu. Zaobserwowano ją natomiast w kontekście linii klonalnej – klon II (europejskiego typu klonalnego) okazał się być znacznie bardziej adherentny niż klon I [51].

Przyleganie do powierzchni biotycznych i abiotycznych umożliwia rozwój biofilmów. Wytwarzanie biofilmu jest też istotnym czynnikiem zwiększającym tolerancję bakterii na środki przeciwdrobnoustrojowe [77]. Do tworzenia biofilmów na powierzchniach abiotycznych niezbędna jest synteza pilusa przez geny systemu CsuA/BABCDE, warunkujące syntezę fimbrii i białka OmpA. Oprócz tego ważne jest także konserwowane białko Bap, które wydaje się być niezbędne do komunikacji między komórkami bakteryjnymi tworzącymi biofilm, zaś mutacje kodujących je genów skutkują osłabieniem zdolności adherentnych, hamując wzrost struktury. Rozwój biofilmu zależy również od zdolności szczepów klinicznych do wytwarzania i wydzielania egzopolisacharydu poli-β-1-6-N-acetyloglukozaminy (PNAG) [54, 67]. Stwierdzono, że pod wpływem czynnika stresowego, jakim jest deficyt substancji odżywczych, A. baumannii wykazuje szybszy wzrost. Zaobserwowano przy tym znaczne obniżenie ekspresji genów aktywnych podczas formowania się biofilmu (ompA, bfmR, csuAB). Oznacza to, że presja w postaci deficytu substancji odżywczych powoduje zmniejszenie adhezji do stałych powierzchni, ale również ograniczenie formowania biofilmu, a co za tym idzie z kolonizacją powierzchni abiotycznych [9].

Dzięki otoczce A. baumannii p osiada zdolność unikania reakcji odpornościowej (układu dopełniacza i fagocytozy). Pałeczka ta potrafi bowiem modyfikować strukturę fosfoetanolaminy lipopolisacharydu otoczkowego (LPS). Jest on głównym składnikiem zewnętrznej błony u bakterii Gram-ujemnych. Ten lipidowo-polisacharydowy heteropolimer zbudowany jest z endotoksycznego lipidu A, rdzenia oligosacharydu oraz antygenu O. Lipopolisacharyd jest cząstką immunoreaktywną, ponieważ indukuje uwalnianie czynnika martwicy nowotworów (TNF) oraz interleukiny 8 (IL-8) w sposób zależny od receptora TLR-4 (Toll-like receptor 4) [50]. LPS odgrywa więc ważną rolę w zjadliwości komórek A. baumannii. Opisano, że mutacja polegająca na pozbawieniu bakterii glikozylotransferazy LpsB, która pełni rolę w biosyntezie LPS, powoduje obniżenie patogenności takich szczepów podczas infekcji tkanek miękkich [55, 61]. Także zahamowanie aktywności enzymu deacylazy UDP-3-O-acylo-N-acetylglukozaminy, kodowanego przez gen LpxC, spowodowało zmniejszoną aktywację TLR-4, obniżenie stanu zapalnego i zwiększoną aktywność fagocytów oraz, co najważniejsze, zwiększoną przeżywalność zainfekowanych myszy [53]. Infekcja wywołana przez A. baumannii może prowadzić do rozwoju sepsy, w czym kluczowe znaczenie ma stymulacja receptorów TLR-4 gospodarza przez LPS. W czasie wstrząsu septycznego LPS również upośledza funkcjonowanie układu odpornościowego gospodarza i jego zdolność do zwalczania infekcji w mechanizmie określanym jako immunoparaliż lub przeprogramowanie układu odpornościowego. Występowanie immunoparaliżu w trakcie sepsy upośledza produkcję cytokin prozapalnych w monocytach, zaburza zdolność do fagocytozy przez neutrofile, wywołuje anergię limfocytów T, a nawet ich apoptozę. Potencjalnie korzystne może być zatem wdrożenie terapii wzmacniającej układ odpornościowy gospodarza i umożliwiającej mu zahamowanie nadmiernego namnożenia się bakterii na samym początku infekcji [50, 100].

Systemy pobierania żelaza, w tym siderofory, również wpływają na wirulencję. Żelazo, chociaż występuje w środowisku dość powszechnie, jest niedostępne dla komórek głównie z powodu chelatowania przez hem oraz białek wiążących żelazo, takich jak laktoferyna. Większość bakterii tlenowych, w tym właśnie A. baumannii, w środowisku ograniczonego dostępu żelaza pozyskuje je za pomocą sideroforów. Najlepiej scharakteryzowanym sideroforem jest acinetobaktyna [50]. Układ, w którym pośredniczy acinetobaktyna, odgrywa kluczową rolę w zdolności szczepu referencyjnego ATCC 19606T do kolonizacji, powodowania uszkodzeń komórek nabłonkowych oraz śmierci zakażonych zwierząt laboratoryjnych. Wskazuje to na fakt, że zdolności pozyskiwania żelaza ze środowiska odgrywają kluczową rolę w zjadliwości [31]. Przy ograniczonym dostępie żelaza rozwój komórek bakteryjnych, u których nie dochodzi do ekspresji genów kodujących acinetobaktynę, możliwy jest dzięki sideroforom – baumannoferynom A i B [73]. Ponadto A. baumannii wychwytuje i wykorzystuje również hem będący produktem metabolizmu gospodarza, zwłaszcza obecny w miejscach uszkodzenia komórek i tkanek, w obrębie których doszło do infekcji (takich jak martwicze zapalenie powięzi) [19, 102]. Co więcej, bakteria ta potrafi wiązać cynk [66].

Wśród czynników wirulencji wyróżnia się poryny, w tym głównie białko OmpA – transbłonowe białko błony zewnętrznej. Białko to związane jest z układem pęcherzyków błony zewnętrznej (OMV – outer membranę vesicles), w skład którego wchodzi błona zewnętrzna, białka peryplazmatyczne, fosfolipidy oraz LPS. OMV przenoszą czynniki wirulencji (w tym OmpA) do wnętrza komórek gospodarza [50]. Lee i wsp. opisali, że mechanizmem, za pomocą którego A. baumannii wywołuje uszkodzenie ludzkich komórek dróg oddechowych w czasie infekcji, jest indukcja apoptozy [51]. Dodatkowo OMV biorą także udział w horyzontalnym transferze genu karbapenemazy OXA-24, co świadczy o możliwości udziału OMV w rozprzestrzenianiu antybiotykooporności wśród szczepów [50]. OmpA oprócz właściwości cytotoksycznych czy możliwości wiązania czynnika H układu dopełniacza, odgrywa znaczącą rolę w kolonizacji nabłonka płuc – promuje adhezję do białek zewnątrzkomórkowej macierzy, w tym fibronektyny [63].

Wśród systemów sekrecji białek, które przyczyniają się do patogenezy A. baumannii, oprócz OMV, należy wymienić systemy sekrecji typu II (T2SS), V (autotransportery) oraz VI (T6SS) [63, 73, 81, 96]. System sekrecji typu II bierze udział w przenoszeniu białek z przestrzeni peryplazmatycznej do środowiska pozakomórkowego. Proces ten jest dwuetapowy. W pierwszej kolejności białka docelowe przenoszone są do peryplazmy przez system Sec lub Tat, skąd białka są kolejno wydzielane z komórki przez T2SS [96]. Zauważono, że delecja genów gspD lub gspE układu T2SS powoduje niezdolność do wydzielania lipazy LipA, która jest substratem dla T2SS. To z kolei powoduje brak zdolności szczepów do wzrostu w obecności długołańcuchowych kwasów tłuszczowych jako jedynym źródle węgla. Inaktywacja układu T2SS i jego substratu – LipA, ma również negatywny wpływ na przeżywalność bakterii in vivo w neutropenicznym mysim modelu bakteriemii [45].

Innym czynnikiem wirulencji jest system sekrecji typu VI (T6SS), używany przez wiele bakterii do wprowadzania białek efektorowych w trakcie infekcji komórek eukariotycznych lub do wyeliminowania bakterii konkurencyjnych [7, 96]. Chociaż T6SS wydaje się istotnie przyczyniać do wzmagania zjadliwości A. baumannii w sposób specyficzny dla danego szczepu, nie u wszystkich badanych szczepów jego rola została określona. System ten pośredniczy w wydzielaniu różnych białek efektorowych, w tym białek toksycznych dla innych bakterii, umożliwiając zabijanie konkurujących bakterii [12, 76]. Co ciekawe, u niektórych szczepów stwierdzono związek między T6SS a opornością na antybiotyki. Duże, koniugacyjne plazmidy (pAB04-1 lub pAB3) nadają oporność na wiele antybiotyków, ale jednocześnie kodują inhibitor T6SS. Dlatego też istnieje duża presja prowadząca do utraty tych plazmidów u niektórych komórek [97].

System sekrecji typu V (T5SS), nazywany również autotransporterowym, wykorzystuje system Sec do transportu białek poza wewnętrzną błonę komórkową. Wiadomo, że system ten pośredniczy w tworzeniu biofilmu oraz adhezji do składników macierzy pozakomórkowej. Ponadto uczestniczy w uzyskiwaniu zjadliwości, co zbadano w mysim modelu ogólnoustrojowego zakażenia A. baumannii [27].

Fosfolipaza jest kolejnym istotnym czynnikiem wirulencji A. baumannii. Enzym ten, metabolizując fosfolipidy obecne w błonach śluzowych, powoduje zmniejszenie stabilności błon komórek gospodarza, a przez to lizę eukariotycznych komórek błonowych ułatwiając inwazję [86]. Wyróżnia się trzy klasy fosfolipaz: fosfolipazę A, fosfolipazę C i fosfolipazę D, różniące się miejscem hydrolizy fosfolipidów, przy czym fosfolipaza A nie jest wymieniana jako czynnik wirulencji A. baumannii [11, 44, 86]. Aktywna fosfolipaza D przyczynia się do zwiększenia zdolności rozprzestrzeniania się zakażenia A. baumannii z płuc do innych organów, co wykazano w mysim modelu zapalenia płuc [3].

Chociaż białka wiążące penicylinę (PBP) u mikroorganizmów są głównie zaangażowane w końcowe etapy biosyntezy peptydoglikanu, to białko PBP6/8, kodowane przez gen pbpG, jest czynnikiem zjadliwości A. baumannii. Szczep, u którego doszło do mutacji genu pbpG charakteryzował się mniejszą przeżywalnością w szczurzym modelu infekcji tkanek miękkich i zapalenia płuc [50].

W modelu mysim opisano związane z płcią różnice we wrażliwości na niektóre szczepy A. baumannii. Stwierdzono, że w modelu zakażenia krwi samice myszy były około dwukrotnie wrażliwsze na hiperwirulentny szczep oporny na kolistynę (LAC-4 ColR uzyskany w wyniku spontanicznej mutacji) niż samce, ale ponad 10-krotnie bardziej odpornew modelu zakażenia płuc na inny szczep (VA-AB41, wyizolowany z płuc i skóry) [56]. Wykazano, że żeński hormon 17β-estradiol jest odpowiedzialny za zmiany w populacjach makrofagów i neutrofili płucnych, powodujące nasiloną odpowiedź zapalną i upośledzoną eradykację patogenu [74]. Badania prowadzone w modelu owadzim (larwa motylicy, barciaka większego – Galleria mellonella) ujawniły aktywność 300 genów aktywnych podczas infekcji in vivo – genów zarówno dobrze już poznanych, jak i tych do tej pory niescharakteryzowanych [34].

Mechanizmy obronne organizmu przeciwko A. baumannii są coraz dokładniej wyjaśniane. Warto wspomnieć o niedawno opisanej roli inflamasomu w indukcji wczesnej odpowiedzi przeciw zakażeniu A. baumannii. Inflamasom to duży, wewnątrzkomórkowy kompleks złożony z białek uczestniczących w aktywacji kaskady prozapalnej. Wykazano, że chociaż inflamasom NLRP3 jest niezbędny do skutecznego zwalczenia infekcji, to kliniczny szczep A. baumannii 8879 o fenotypie XDR, należący do klonu II (wywołujący bakteriemię u pacjentów z ranami pooparzeniowymi w OIT), za pośrednictwem inflamasomu NLRP3 indukuje wzmożoną produkcję cytokin IL-1β i IL-18 oraz uszkodzenie płuc. Niewątpliwie dalsze badania nad znaczeniem aktywacji tego szlaku przez A. baumannii są konieczne [22]. Graficzne podsumowanie najważniejszych czynników patogenezy oraz mechanizmów ich działania przedstawiono na rycinie 2.

Ryc. 2.

Czynniki wirulencji Acinetobacter baumannii oraz ich znaczenie w procesie patogenezy

10.21307_PM-2021.60.4.21-f004.jpg

6. Kontrola zakażeń

Wzrost oporności szczepów A. baumannii na środki przeciwdrobnoustrojowe pozostawia coraz mniej opcji terapeutycznych. Nie istnieją niestety skuteczne schematy leczenia zakażenia wywołanego przez wielolekooporne szczepy A. baumannii. Brak dużych prospektywnych badań klinicznych utrudnia ocenę terapii skojarzonej w przypadku infekcji szczepami MDR. Większość dostępnych danych dotyczących skuteczności poszczególnych terapii pochodzi z opisów serii przypadków (pozbawionych kontroli), obserwacji klinicznych, badań in vitro oraz modeli zwierzęcych. Różne badania wykazują sprzeczne wyniki dla tych samych kombinacji środków przeciwdrobnoustrojowych [10, 28].

Lekami pierwszego rzutu w terapii zakażeń wywołanych przez szczepy MDR zazwyczaj są karbapenemy. Jednak prawie połowa szczepów izolowanych od osób z zakażeniami związanymi z opieką zdrowotną, zgłoszonych do CDC National Healthcare Safety Network w 2014 roku, okazała się szczepami CRAB [10]. W zwalczaniu infekcji wywołanych przez A. baumannii stosuje się także inne antybiotyki β-laktamowe, w tym cefalosporyny o szerokim spektrum działania (ceftazydym lub cefepim). Wysoką aktywność bakteriobójczą względem izolatów A. baumannii wykazuje inhibitor β-laktamazy – sulbaktam. Jednak, zgodnie z doniesieniem Kanafani i wsp., nawet szczepy oporne na karbapenemy mogą wykazywać wrażliwość in vitro na ten związek [46]. Aminoglikozydy, takie jak tobramycyna i amikacyna, również są stosowane w przypadku infekcji MDR A. baumannii. Antybiotyki te są głównie stosowane w połączeniu z antybiotykami należącymi do innych grup. Liczne wielolekooporne izolaty zachowują jednak pośrednią wrażliwość na tę grupę leków [28].

W przypadku oporności na powyższe środki przeciwbakteryjne opcje terapeutyczne są ograniczone. W takich sytuacjach jako leki ostatniego rzutu stosuje się polimyksyny (kolistynę oraz polimyksynę B – nie jest stosowana klinicznie), a także tetracykliny (zwłaszcza minocyklinę i tygecyklinę). Nie ma randomizowanych badań dotyczących ich skuteczności, głównie dlatego, że są one zastrzeżone do stosowania w przypadku mikroorganizmów o wysokiej oporności. Wiadomo jednak, że kolistyna wykazuje znaczną nefro- i neurotoksyczność. W badaniach obserwacyjnych odnotowano 57–77% wyleczeń lub poprawy stanu zdrowia po zastosowaniu kolistyny wśród ciężko chorych pacjentów z zakażeniami szczepami MDR (w tym z zapaleniem płuc, bakteriemią, zakażeniem w obrębie jamy brzusznej i zakażeniem ośrodkowego układu nerwowego – OUN). W badaniach in vitro najwyższą aktywność przeciwdrobnoustrojową wykazują obie polimyksyny i, mimo że wykazują toksyczność wobec nerek, są często stosowane jako leki ratujące życie [28, 33].

Także APIC (Association for Professionals in Infecion Control and Epidemiology) podkreśla rolę kontroli ognisk infekcji Ab-MDR oraz ograniczania transmisji szczepów. Wśród sposobów kontroli wymienia się komunikację pomiędzy placówkami ochrony zdrowia, w których przebywa zakażony pacjent. Każdy ośrodek powinien dokumentować pojawienie się Ab-MDR u takiego pacjenta. Podstawową jednak zasadą kontroli epidemii jest identyfikacja rezerwuaru szczepów oraz jego eliminacja (dekontaminacja sprzętu medycznego, w tym respiratora). Ponadto APIC wspomina także o edukowaniu nie tylko personelu medycznego na temat sposobów transmisji szczepów, ale także odwiedzających. Ważne jest także kohortowanie osób skolonizowanych lub zakażonych Ab-MDR oraz ich opiekunów medycznych [5]. W przypadku pojawienia się ognisk infekcji należy ograniczyć przyjmowanie do danej jednostki medycznej nowych pacjentów. W procesie wygaszania ogniska epidemicznego niezmiernie ważna jest edukacja personelu, skrupulatna higiena rąk oraz dekontaminacja środowiska szpitalnego [99].

Oporność szczepów A. baumannii na karbapenemy w niektórych częściach świata przekracza 90%, a śmiertelność w przypadku najczęstszych zakażeń o etiologii CRAB, tj. szpitalnego zapalenia płuc (HAP) i zakażeń krwi może zbliżać się do 60%. Obecnie stosowane w terapii zakażeń CRAB leki przeciwdrobnoustrojowe (tj. polimyksyny, tygecyklina, a czasem aminoglikozydy) są dalekie od doskonałych, ze względu na właściwości farmakokinetyczne tych związków oraz narastające wskaźniki oporności [42]. Biorąc zatem pod uwagę brak dobrych opcji terapeutycznych, niezbędny jest rozwój nowych terapii, a także przeprowadzenie badań klinicznych, które pozwoliłyby na opracowanie i stosowanie skutecznego schematu leczenia. Do tego czasu kluczowe jest zapobieganie transferu szczepów A. baumannii w placówkach opieki medycznej.

Prowadzonych jest wiele badań mających na celu opracowanie skutecznych terapii zwalczania zakażeń A. baumannii. Jedne z nich opierają się na nowych, drobnocząsteczkowych antybiotykach o specyficznej aktywności przeciwko tej bakterii. Mogą to być m.in. nowe inhibitory β-laktamaz połączone z antybiotykiem bądź inhibitory syntezy białek w rybosomach (pirolocytozynowy antybiotyk RX-P873 o ogromnym potencjale przeciw klinicznym izolatom A. baumannii). Innym podejściem są nowe modyfikacje antybiotyków (np. cefalosporyny skoniugowane z sideroforem). Przykładem cefalosporyny sideroforowej jest cefiderokol. Podobne działanie mogą wykazywać przeciwbakteryjne peptydy (AMP, antimicrobial peptides), zaburzające funkcjonowanie błon bakteryjnych. Przykładem AMP jest bogaty w prolinę A3-APO, izolowany ze skóry żab i ropuch, wykazujący wysoki potencjał bakteriobójczy w przedklinicznych modelach zakażeń krwi i ran. Kolejną perspektywę stanowią przeżywające obecnie renesans terapie fagowe. Od 2010 roku identyfikuje się fagi specyficzne dla A. baumannii (pierwsze: AB1 i AB2) powodujące lizę tego gatunku lub przedstawicieli tego rodzaju. Na uwagę zasługuje wyizolowany w 2012 roku fag AP22, wykazujący najszersze działanie przeciwko klinicznym szczepom A. baumannii (zwalczający 68% szpitalnych izolatów) [30, 32, 100]. Gatunkowo specyficzne fagi mogą być także użyteczne do odkażania pomieszczeń, w których przebywają pacjenci. W 2013 roku na Tajwanie po raz pierwszy sprawdzono wpływ włączenia aerozolu zawierającego aktywne bakteriofagi (8 szczepów) skierowane przeciwko CRAB do standardowej procedury odkażania pomieszczeń szpitalnych w OIT. W ciągu 8-miesięcznego okresu badania stwierdzono spadek liczby izolatów CRAB o 41,69%, a także wzrost liczby szczepów karbapenemo-wrażliwych (prawdopodobnie z powodu skierowania badanych fagów przeciwko szczepom CRAB) [32, 40]. Potwierdzono znaczący potencjał fagów do dekolonizacji oraz zakłócania tworzenia biofilmu przez A. baumannii (fagi AB7-IBBI, AB7-ABB2). Ciekawą możliwością są również peptydy lityczne izolowane z tych fagów – np. endolizyna LysSS. W badaniu z 2020 roku wykazano zahamwanie rozwoju szczepów MDR A. baumannii, ponadto nie stwierdzono jej cytotoksycznego działania wobec komórek ludzkich (w badaniu na linii ludzkich komórek płucnych A549) [47]. Niektórzy badacze sięgają po bardziej tradycyjne metody, jak znane od starożytności olejki eteryczne. Wykazują one bardzo zróżnicowaną skuteczność, zależnie od szczepu bakterii oraz rośliny, z której zostały wyizolowane. Substancje te prawdopodobnie nie będą na tyle skuteczne, by je stosować samodzielnie, ale mogą być użytecznym uzupełnieniem antybiotykoterapii. Zupełnie inne podejście wskazują prace nad fototerapią. Rozwiązanie to miałoby się opierać na miejscowym wytwarzaniu reaktywnych form tlenu, jednak niosłoby to ze sobą zagrożenie uszkodzenia pobliskich tkanek. Kolejną strategią są szczepienia (prewencyjne i terapeutyczne) przeciwko zakażeniom Acinetobacter. Trudnością jest to, że pośród szczepów A. baumannii stwierdza się około 40 serotypów, przez co szczepionki musiałyby być multiwalentne. Najbardziej obiecującymi celami wydają się być białko OmpA i konserwowana nukleaza NucAb. Jednak w praktyce klinicznej bardziej użyteczna mogłaby się okazać immunizacja bierna, polegająca na podawaniu pacjentowi gotowych przeciwciał. Ważne jest zatem opracowanie takiego przeciwciała monoklonalnego (lub mieszaniny przeciwciał), które byłoby w stanie inaktywować ponad 90% izolatów A. baumannii. Jeszcze jedną potencjalną opcją terapeutyczną jest wyłapywanie lub maskowanie jonów metali (Fe, Zn), albowiem ograniczenie dostępności tych jonów hamuje wzrost bakterii. Jednakże należy mieć na uwadze, że tego typu terapia mogłaby się okazać obusiecznym mieczem, ze względu na opisany wyżej wpływ deficytu metali na wirulencję [42, 57, 75, 79, 100]. Polepszenie perspektyw zwalczania A. baumannii wiąże się z lepszym poznaniem mechanizmów wirulencji i oporności tego gatunku na antybiotyki [6, 15].

7. Podsumowanie

Pałeczki A. baumannii to Gram-ujemne bakterie szeroko rozpowszechnione w środowisku. Są łatwo izolowane z terenów wilgotnych, niemniej są w stanie przetrwać również na powierzchniach suchych. Jako patogeny oportunistyczne często są składową fizjologicznej mikrobioty organizmów zwierzęcych oraz człowieka. Ze względu na szczególną zdolność A. baumannii do przetrwania niekorzystnych warunków, wyjątkową wytrzymałość, naturalną oporność na wiele grup antybiotyków, możliwość szybkiego nabywania i rozwijania różnorodnych mechanizmów oporności, zawężającą się gamę leków, które możemy zastosować w terapii oraz narastającą liczbę izolatów opornych na karbapenemy pałeczki te stanowią realny powód do niepokoju i wzmożonych poszukiwań skutecznych metod leczenia.

Acknowledgements

The work was created as a result of the National Science Center grant No. 2016/23/D/NZ6/02554 and the BOB-661-117/2019 and project implemented under the “micro-grant” program on cooperation between the University of Warsaw and the Medical University of Warsaw.

Podziękowania

Praca powstała w wyniku realizacji grantu Narodowego Centrum Nauki nr 2016/23/D/NZ6/02554 oraz projektu BOB-661-117/2019 realizowanego w ramach programu „mikro-grant” dotyczącego współpracy pomiędzy UW i WUM.

Conflict of Interests

Radosław Stachowiak is a member of the editorial office of Advancements of Microbiology. Editor R. Stachowiak declares that he did not exert any influence on the review and decision-making process of the editorial committee during the preparation of this work.

Konflikt interesów

Radosław Stachowiak jest członkiem redakcji Postępów Mikrobiologii. Redaktor R. Stachowiak deklaruje, że nie wywierał wpływu na proces recenzji i decyzyjny komitetu redakcyjnego podczas powstawania tej pracy.

References


  1. Al Atrouni A., Joly-Guillou M.L., Hamze M., Kempf M.: Reservoirs of non-baumannii Acinetobacter species. Front. Microbiol. 7, 49 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  2. Amaya-Villar R., Garnacho-Montero J.: How should we treat Acinetobacter pneumonia? Curr. Opin. Crit. Care, 25, 465–472 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  3. Antunes L.C., Imperi F., Towner K.J., Visca P.: Genome-assisted identification of putative iron-utilization genes in Acinetobacter baumannii and their distribution among a genotypically diverse collection of clinical isolates. Res. Microbiol. 162, 279–284 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  4. Asplund M.B., Coelho C., Cordero R.J., Martinez L.R.: Alcohol impairs J774.16 macrophage-like cell antimicrobial functions in Acinetobacter baumannii infection. Virulence, 4, 467–472 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  5. Association for professionals in infection control and epidemiology: guide to the elimination of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii transmission in healthcare settings, https://apic.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/APIC-AB-Guide.pdf (2010)
  6. Ayoub Moubareck C. i Hammoudi Halat D.: Insights into Acinetobacter baumannii: a review of microbiological, virulence, and resistance traits in a threatening nosocomial pathogen. Antibiotics, 9, 119 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  7. Basler M., Ho B.T., Mekalanos J.J.: Tit-for-tat: type VI secretion system counterattack during bacterial cell-cell interactions. Cell, 152, 884–894 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  8. Błaszczyk M.K.: Mikrobiologia środowisk, red. Mostowik K., PWN, Warszawa (2014)
  9. Bravo Z., Orruño M., Parada C., Kaberdin V.R., Barcina I., Arana I.: The long-term survival of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606T under nutrient-deprived conditions does not require the entry into the viable but non-culturable state. Arch. Microbiol. 198, 399–407 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  10. Bulens S.N., Sarah H.Y., Walters M.S., Jacob J.T., Bower C., Reno J., Wilson L., Vaeth E., Bamberg W., Janelle S.J., Lynfield R., Snippes Vagnone P., Shaw K., Kainer M., Muleta D., Mounsey J., Dumyati G., Concannon C., Beldavs Z., Cassidy P.M., Phipps E.C., Kenslow N., Hancock E.B., Kallen A.J.: Carbapenem-nonsusceptible Acinetobacter baumannii, 8 US metropolitan areas, 2012–2015. Emerging infectious diseases, 24, 727 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  11. Camarena L., Bruno V., Euskirchen G., Poggio S., Snyder M.: Molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced pathogenesis revealed by RNA-sequencing. PloS Pathog. 6, 4 (2010)
    [CROSSREF]
  12. Carruthers M.D., Nicholson P.A., Tracy E.N., Munson R.S. Jr.: Acinetobacter baumannii utilizes a type VI secretion system for bacterial competition. PLoS ONE, 8, 3 (2013)
    [CROSSREF]
  13. Castellanos N., Nakanouchi J., Yüzen D.I., Fung S., Fernandez J.S., Barberis C., Tuchscherr L., Ramirez M.S.: A study on Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus strains recovered from the same infection site of a diabetic patient. Curr. Microbiol. 76, 842–847 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  14. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States (2013) [cited 2017 Apr 24]
  15. Chakravarty B.: Genetic mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii: background, challenges and future prospects. Molecular biology reports, 47, 4037–4046 (2020)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  16. Chastre J., Fagon J.-Y.: Ventilator-associated pneumonia. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 165, 867–903 (2002)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  17. Chmielarczyk A., Pomorska-Wesołowska M., Romaniszyn D., Wójkowska-Mach J.: healthcare-associated laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infections-species diversity and resistance mechanisms, a four-year retrospective laboratory-based study in the South of Poland. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public health, 18, 2785 (2021)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  18. Clemmer K.M., Bonomo R.A., Rather P.N.: Genetic analysis of surface motility in Acinetobacter baumannii. Microbiology, 157, 2534–2544 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  19. Corradino B., Toia F., di Lorenzo S., Cordova A., Moschella F.: A difficult case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Acinetobacter baumannii. Int. J. Low Extrem. Wounds, 9, 152–154 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  20. Derecho I., McCoy K.B., Vaishampayan P., Venkateswaran K., Mogul R.: Characterization of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter species isolated during the Mars phoenix spacecraft assembly. Astrobiology, 14, 837–847 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  21. Dexter C., Murray G.L., Paulsen I.T., Peleg A.Y.: Community-acquire Acinetobacter baumannii: clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathogenesis. Expert Rev. Anti Infect. Ther. 13, 567–573 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  22. Dikshit N., Kale S.D., Khameneh H.J., Balamuralidhar V., Tang C.Y., Kumar P., Lim T.P., Tan T.T., Kwa A.L., Mortellaro A., Sukumaran B.: NLRP3 inflammasome pathway has a critical role in the host immunity against clinically relevant Acinetobacter baumannii pulmonary infection. Mucosal Immunol. 11, 257–272 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  23. Dubiel G., Kozłowski B., Deptuła A., Hryniewicz W.: Raport NPOA z programu czynnego monitorowania zakażeń w oddziałach anestezjologii i intensywnej terapii w 2018 roku w Polsce (2018)
  24. Dunlap C.A., Rooney A.P.: Acinetobacter dijkshoorniae is a later heterotypic synonym of Acinetobacter lactucae. International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology, 68, 131–132 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  25. Duszynska W., Litwin A., Rojek S., Szczesny A., Ciasullo A., Gozdzik W.: Analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii hospital infections in patients treated at the intensive care unit of the University Hospital, Wroclaw, Poland: a 6-year, single-center, retrospective study. Infect Drug Resist. 11, 629–635 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  26. Eijkelkamp B.A., Hassan K.A., Paulsen I.T., Brown M.H.: Investigation of the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii under iron limiting conditions. BMC Genomics, 12, 126 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  27. Elhosseiny N.M., Attia A.S.: Acinetobacter: an emerging pathogen with a versatile secretome. Emerg. Microbes Infect. 7, 1–15 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  28. Eliopoulos G.M., Maragakis L.L., Perl T.M.: Acinetobacter baumannii: epidemiology, antimicrobial resistance, and treatment options. Clinn. Infect. Dis. 46, 1254–1263 (2008)
    [CROSSREF]
  29. Erdem H., Cag Y., Gencer S., Uysal S., Karakurt Z., Harman R., Ulug M.: Treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by Acinetobacter: results of prospective and multicenter ID-IRI study. Eur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 39, 45–52 2020)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  30. Flamm R.K., Rhomberg P.R., Jones R.N., Farrell D.J.: In vitro activity of RX-P873 against Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 59, 2280–2285 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  31. Gaddy J.A., Actis L.A.: Regulation of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation. Future Microbiol. 4, 273–278 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  32. García-Quintanilla M., Pulido M.R., López-Rojas R., Pachón J., McConnell M.J.: Emerging therapies for multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Trends in Microbiology, 21, 157–163 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  33. Garnacho-Montero J., Timsit J-F: Managing Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Curr. Opin. Infect. Dis. 32, 69–76 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  34. Gebhardt M.J., Gallagher L.A., Jacobson R.K., Usacheva E.A., Peterson L.R., Zurawski D.V., Shuman H.A.: Joint transcriptional control of virulence and resistance to antibiotic and environmental stress in Acinetobacter baumannii. MBio, 6, 1–12 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  35. Giammanco A., Cala C., Fasciana T., Dowzlcky M.: Global assessment of the activity of tigecycline against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens between 2004 and 2014 as part of the tigecycline evaluation and surveillance trial. Msphere, 2, 1 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  36. Gorylik-Salmonowicz A., Popowska M.: Occurence of the coselection phenomenon in non-clinical environments / Występowanie zjawiska koselekcji w środowiskach pozaklinicznych. Advancements of Microbiology, 58, 433–446 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  37. Grochowalska A., Kozioł-Montewka M., Oliynyk O., Krasij N.: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in view of the microbial properties of the ESKAPE group in neighbouring countries – Poland and Ukraine. J. Pre-Clin. Clin. Res. 11, 111–115 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  38. Henriksen S.D.: Moraxella, Acinetobacter, and the Mimae. Bacteriol. Rev. 37, 522–561 (1973)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  39. Henry R.: Etymologia: Acinetobacter. Emerg. Infect. Dis. 19, 841 (2013)
  40. Ho Y.H., Tseng C.C., Wang L.S., Chen Y.T., Ho G.J., Lin T.Y., Wang L.Y., Chen L.K.: Application of bacteriophage-containing aerosol against nosocomial transmission of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an intensive care unit. PloS One, 11, 12 (2016)
  41. Inchai J., Pothirat Ch., Bumroongkit Ch., Limsukon A., Khositsakulchai W., Liwsrisakun Ch.: Prognostic factors associated with mortality of drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii ventilator-associated pneumonia, J. Intensive Care, 3, 9 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  42. Isler B., Doi Y., Bonomo R.A., Paterson D.L.: New treatment options against carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Antimicrob. Agents Ch. 63, 1 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  43. Ivanković T., Goić-Barišić I., Hrenović J.: Reduced susceptibility to disinfectants of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms on glass and ceramic. Arh. Hig. Rada Toksiko. 68, 99–107 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  44. Jacobs A.C., Hood I., Boyd K.L., Olson P.D., Morrison J.M., Carson S., Dunman P.M.: Inactivation of phospholipase D diminishes Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis. Infect. Immun. 78, 1952–1962 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  45. Johnson T.L., Waack U., Smith S., Mobley H., Sandkvist M.: Acinetobacter baumannii is dependent on the type II secretion system and its substrate LipA for lipid utilization and in vivo fitness. J. Bacteriol. 198, 711–719 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  46. Kanafani Z.A., Kanj S.S.: Acinetobacter infection: Treatment and prevention, https://www.uptodate.com/contents/acinetobacter-infection-treatment-and-prevention (20.11.2018)
  47. Kim S., Lee D.W., Jin J.S., Kim J.: Antimicrobial activity of LysSS, a novel phage endolysin, against Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J. Global Antimicrob. Res. 22, 32–39 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  48. Koulenti D., Lisboa T., Brun-Buisson Ch., Krueger W.; Macor A., Sole-Violan J., Diaz E., Topeli A., DeWaele J., Carneiro A., Martin-Loeches I., Armaganidis A., Rello J.: Spectrum of practice in the diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia in patients requiring mechanical ventilation in European intensive care units. Critical care medicine, 37, 2360–2369 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  49. Kubler A., Adamiak B., Durek G., Mayzner-Zawadzka E., Gaszyński W., Karpel E., Duszyńska W.: Results of the severe sepsis registry in intensive care units in Poland from 2003–2009, Anaesthesion Intensive Ther. 47, 7–13 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  50. Lee C.R., Lee J.H., Park M., Park K.S., Bae I.K., Kim Y.B., Cha C.J., Jeong B.C., Lee S.H.: Biology of Acinetobacter baumannii: pathogenesis, antibiotic resistance mechanism, and prospective treatments options. Front. Cell. Infect. Microbiol. 13, 7–55 (2017)
  51. Lee J.C., Koerten H., Van den Broek P., Beekhuizen H., Wolterbeek R., Van den Barselaar M., van der Reijden T., van der Meer J., Dijkshoorn, L.: Adherence of Acinetobacter baumannii strains to human bronchial epithelial cells. Res. Microbiol. 157, 360–366 (2006)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  52. Lessel E.F.: Subcommittee on nomenclature of Moraxella and allied bacteria. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 21, 213–214 (1971)
    [CROSSREF]
  53. Lin L., Tan B., Pantapalangkoor P., Ho T., Baquir B., Tomaras A., Fernandez L.: Inhibition of LpxC protects mice from resistant Acinetobacter baumannii by modulating inflammation and enhancing phagocytosis. MBio, 3, e00312–12 (2012)
  54. Longo F., Vuotto C., Donelli G.: Biofilm formation in Acinetobacter baumannii. New Microbiol. 37, 119–127 (2014)
    [PUBMED]
  55. Luke N.R., Sauberan S.L., Russo T.A., Beanan J.M., Olson R., Loehfelm T.W., Campagnari A.A.: Identification and characterization of a glycosyltransferase involved in Acinetobacter baumannii lipopolysaccharide core biosynthesis. Infect. Immun. 78, 2017–2023 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  56. Luna B.M., Yan J., Reyna Z., Moon E., Nielsen T.B., Reza H., Lu P., Bonomo R., Louie A., Drusano G., Bulitta J. She R., Spellberg B.: Natural history of Acinetobacter baumannii infection in mice. PloS One, 14, 7 (2019)
  57. Mahboubi M., Feizabadi M.M: Antimicrobial activity of some essential oils alone and in combination with amikacin against Acinetobacter sp. J. Mircobiol. Biot. Food Sci. 5, 412–415 (2016)
  58. Manchanda V., Sanchaita S., Singh N.P.: Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter. J. Glob. Infect. Dis. 2, 291 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  59. Mantilla-Calderon D., Plewa M.J., Michoud G., Fodelianakis S., Daffonchio D., Hong P.Y.: Water disinfection byproducts increase natural transformation rates of environmental DNA in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. Environ. Sci. Tech. 53, 6520–6528 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  60. Mantzarlis K., Makris D., Zakynthinos E.: Riskfactors for the firstepisode of Acinetobacter baumannii resistant to colistin infection and outcome in critically ill patients. J. Med. Microbiol. 69, 35–40 (2020)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  61. McConnell M.J., Actis L., Pachón J.: Acinetobacter baumannii: human infections, factors contributing to pathogenesis and Animals models. FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 37, 130–155 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  62. Mizerski W., Bednarczuk B., Kawalec M.: Słownik bakterii, red. Bednarczuk B., Adamantan, Warszawa (2008)
  63. Morris F.C., Dexter C., Kostoulias X., Uddin M.I., Peleg A.Y.: The mechanisms of disease caused by Acinetobacter baumannii. Front. Microbiol. 10, 1601 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  64. Murray P.R., Rosenthal K.S., Pfaller M.A.: Pseudomonas i bakterie podobne (w) Mikrobiologia, red. Przondo-Mordarska A., Martirosian G., Szkaradkiewicz A., Edra Urban & Partner, Wrocław, 325–332 (2016)
  65. Mussi M.A., Gaddy J.A., Cabruja M., Viale A.M., Rasia R., Actis L.A.: Motility, virulence and biofilm formation by the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii are affected by blue light. J. Bacteriol. 192, 6336–6345 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  66. Nairn B.L., Lonergan Z.R., Wang J., Braymer J.J., Zhang Y., Calcutt M.W., Lisher J.P., Gilston B.A., Chazin W.J., de Crecy-Lagard V., Giedroc D.P.: The response of Acinetobacter baumannii to zinc starvation. Cell Host Microbe, 19, 826–836 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  67. Namysłowska A., Laudy A.E., Tyski S.: Mechanizmy oporności Acinetobacter baumannii na związki przeciwbakteryjne. Post. Mikrobiol. 54, 392–406 (2015)
  68. Nemec A., Krizova L., Maixnerova M., Sedo O., Brisse S., Higgins P.G.: Acinetobacter seifertii sp. nov., a member of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolated from human clinical specimens. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Micr. 65, 934–942 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  69. Nwugo C.C., Arivett B.A., Zimbler D.L., Gaddy J.A., Richards A.M., Actis L.A.: Effect of ethanol on differential protein production and expression of potential virulence functions in the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. PloS One, 7, 12 (2012)
    [CROSSREF]
  70. O’Neill J.: Antimicrobial Resistance: Tackling a crisis for the health and wealth of nations. The review on antimicrobial resistance (2014)
  71. Papathanakos G., Andrianopoulos I., Papathanasiou A., Priavali E., Koulenti D., Koulouras V.: Colistin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia: a serious threat for critically ill patients. Microorganisms, 8, 287 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  72. Pelag A.Y., Seifert H., Petwrson D.L.: Acinetobacter baumannii: emergence of a successful pathogen. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 21, 538–582 (2008)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  73. Penwell W.F., DeGrace N., Tentarelli S., Gauthier L., Gilbert C.M., Arivett B.A., Miller A.A., Durand-Reville T., Jourbran C. Actis L.A.: Discovery and characterization of new hydroxamate siderophores, baumannoferrin A and B, produced by Acinetobacter baumannii. Chem. Biochem. 16, 1896–1904 (2015)
  74. Pires S., Peignier A., Seto J., Smyth D.S., Parker D.: Biological sex influences susceptibilillity to Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia in mice. JCI Insight. 5, e132223 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  75. Rafei R., Osman M., Dabboussi F., Hamze M.: Update on the epidemiological typing methods for Acinetobacter baumannii. Future Microbiol. 14, 1065–1080 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  76. Repizo G.D., Gagne S., Foucault-Grunenwald M.L., Borges V., Charpentier X., Limansky A.S., Salcedo S.P.: Differential role of the T6SS in Acinetobacter baumannii virulence. PLoS One, 10, 9 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  77. Reza A., Sutton J.M., Rahman K.M.: Effectiveness of efflux pump inhibitors as biofilm disruptors and resistance breakers in Gram-negative (ESKAPEE) bacteria. Antibiotics, 8, 4 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  78. Rice L.B.: Federal funding for the study of antimicrobial resistance in nosocomial pathogens: no ESKAPE. J. Infect. Dis. 197, 1079–1081 (2008)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  79. Roca Subirà I., Espinal P., Vila-Farrés X., Vila Estapé J.: The Acinetobacter baumannii oxymoron: commensal hospital dweller turned pan-drug-resistant menace. Front. Microbiol. 3, 148 (2012)
    [PUBMED]
  80. Santaniello A., Sansone M., Fioretti A., Menna L.F.: Systematic review and meta-analysis of the occurrence of ESKAPE bacteria group in dogs, and the related zoonotic risk in animal-assisted therapy, and in animal-assisted activity in the health context. Int. J. Env. Res. Public Health, 17, 3278 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  81. Schweppe D.K., Harding C., Chavez J.D., Wu X., Ramage E., Singh P.K., Manoil C., Bruce J.E.: Host-microbe protein interactions during bacterial infection. Chem. Biol. 22, 1521–1530 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  82. Šiširak M., Hukić M.: Acinetobacter baumannii as a cause of sepsis. MedGlas, 9, 311–316 (2012)
  83. Słoczyńska A., Wand M.E., Tyski S., Laudy A.E.: Analysis of blaCHDL Genes and Insertion Sequences Related to Carbapenem Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Strains Isolated in Warsaw, Poland. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 22, 2486 (2021)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  84. Smith M.G., Des Etages S.G., Snyder M.: Microbial synergy via anethanol-triggered pathway. Mol. Cell Biol. 24, 3874–3884 (2004)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  85. Spellberg B., Rex J.H.: The value of single-pathogen antibacterial agents. Nat. Rev. Drug Discov. 12, 963 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  86. Stahl J., Bergmann H., Gottig S., Ebersberger I., Averhoff B.: Acinetobacter baumannii virulence is mediated by the concerted action of three phospholipases D. PloS One, 10, 9 (2015)
  87. Szczypta A., Talaga-Ćwiertnia K., Kielar M., Krzyściak P., Gajewska A., Szura M., Bulanda M., Chmielarczyk A.: Investigation of Acinetobacter baumannii Activity in Vascular Surgery Units through Epidemiological Management Based on the Analysis of Antimicrobial Resistance, Biofilm Formation and Genotyping. Int. J. Env. Res. Pub. He. 18, 1563 (2021)
    [CROSSREF]
  88. Szewczyk E.M.: Zakażenia związane z opieką zdrowotną. (oraz) Sobiś-Glinkowska M., Różalska M.: Tlenowe pałeczki gram-ujemne (w) Diagnostyka bakteriologiczna, red. Szewczyk E.M., PWN, Warszawa (2019)
  89. Tacconelli E., Carrara E., Savoldi A., Harbarth S., Mendelson M., Monnet D.L., Zorzet A.: Discovery, research, and development of new antibiotics: the WHO priority list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and tuberculosis. Lancet Infect. Dis. 18, 318–327 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  90. Touchon M., Cury J., Yoon E.J., Krizova L., Cerqueira G.C., Murphy C., Feldgarden M., Wortman J., Clermont D., Lambert T., Grillot-Courvalin C., Nemec A., Courvalin P., Rocha E.P.C.: The genomic diversification of the whole Acinetobacter genus: origins, mechanisms, and consequences. Genome Biol. Evol. 6, 2866–2882 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  91. Traglia G.M., Place K., Dotto C., Fernandez J.S., Montaña S., dos Santos Bahiense C., Bonomo R.A.: Interspecies DNA acquisition by a naturally competent Acinetobacter baumannii strain. Int. J. Antimicrob. Ag. 53, 483–490 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  92. Van der Kolk J.H., Endimiani A., Graubner C., Gerber V., Perreten V.: Acinetobacter in veterinary medicine, with an emphasis on Acinetobacter baumannii. J. Glob. Antimicrob. Re, 16, 59–71 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  93. Veening J.W., Blokesch M.: Interbacterial predation as a strategy for DNA acquisition in naturally competent bacteria. Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 15, 621 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  94. Vincent J., Rello J., Marshall J., Silva E., Anzueto A., Martin C.D., Reinhart K.: International study of the prevalence and outcomes of infection in intensive care units. JAMA.; 302, 2323–2329 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  95. Wałaszek M., Różańska A., Bulanda M., Wójkowska-Mach J.: Alarmujące wyniki występowania szpitalnych zakażeń krwi w wieloośrodkowym programie nadzoru nad zakażeniami szpitalnymi w polskich oddziałach intensywnej terapii medycznej. Przegląd Epidemiol. 72, 33–44 (2018)
  96. Weber B.S., Kinsella R.L., Harding C.M., Feldman M.F.: The secrets of Acinetobacter secretion. Trends Microbiol. 25, 532–545 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  97. Weber B.S., Ly P.M., Irwin J.N., Pukatzki S., Feldman M.F.: A multidrug resistance plasmid contains the molecular switch for type VI secretion in Acinetobacter baumannii. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 112, 9442–9447 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  98. Wilharm G., Skiebe E., Higgins P.G., Poppel M.T., Blaschke U., Leser S., Jerzak L.: Relatedness of wildlife and livestock avian isolates of the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii to lineages spread in hospitals worldwide. Env. Microbiol. 19, 4349–4364 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  99. Wilks M., Wilson A., Warwisk S., Price E., Kennedz D., Elz A., Millar M.R.: Control of an Outbreak of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticuscolonization and infection in an intensive care unit (ICU) without closing the ICU or placing patients in isolation. Infect. Cont. Hosp. Ep. 27, 654–658 (2006)
    [CROSSREF]
  100. Wong D., Nielsen T.B., Bonomo R.A., Pantapalangkoor P., Luna B., Spellberg B.: Clinical and pathophysiological overview of Acinetobacter infections: a century of challenges. American Society for Microbiology. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 30, 409–447 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  101. Xu A., Zhu H., Gao B., Weng H., Ding Z., Li M., He G.: Diagnosis of severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Acinetobacter baumannii through next-generation sequencing: a case report. BMC Infect. Dis. 20, 1–7 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  102. Zimbler D.L., Penwell W.F., Gaddy J.A., Menke S.M., Tomaras A.P., Connerly P.L., Actis L.A.: Iron acquisition functions expressed by the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. Biometals, 22, 23–32 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  103. Al Atrouni A., Joly-Guillou M.L., Hamze M., Kempf M.: Reservoirs of non-baumannii Acinetobacter species. Front. Microbiol. 7, 49 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  104. Amaya-Villar R., Garnacho-Montero J.: How should we treat Acinetobacter pneumonia? Curr. Opin. Crit. Care, 25, 465–472 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  105. Antunes L.C., Imperi F., Towner K.J., Visca P.: Genome-assisted identification of putative iron-utilization genes in Acinetobacter baumannii and their distribution among a genotypically diverse collection of clinical isolates. Res. Microbiol. 162, 279–284 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  106. Asplund M.B., Coelho C., Cordero R.J., Martinez L.R.: Alcohol impairs J774.16 macrophage-like cell antimicrobial functions in Acinetobacter baumannii infection. Virulence, 4, 467–472 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  107. Association for professionals in infection control and epidemiology: guide to the elimination of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii transmission in healthcare settings, https://apic.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/APIC-AB-Guide.pdf (2010)
  108. Ayoub Moubareck C. i Hammoudi Halat D.: Insights into Acinetobacter baumannii: a review of microbiological, virulence, and resistance traits in a threatening nosocomial pathogen. Antibiotics, 9, 119 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  109. Basler M., Ho B.T., Mekalanos J.J.: Tit-for-tat: type VI secretion system counterattack during bacterial cell-cell interactions. Cell, 152, 884–894 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  110. Błaszczyk M.K.: Mikrobiologia środowisk, red. Mostowik K., PWN, Warszawa (2014)
  111. Bravo Z., Orruño M., Parada C., Kaberdin V.R., Barcina I., Arana I.: The long-term survival of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606T under nutrient-deprived conditions does not require the entry into the viable but non-culturable state. Arch. Microbiol. 198, 399–407 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  112. Bulens S.N., Sarah H.Y., Walters M.S., Jacob J.T., Bower C., Reno J., Wilson L., Vaeth E., Bamberg W., Janelle S.J., Lynfield R., Snippes Vagnone P., Shaw K., Kainer M., Muleta D., Mounsey J., Dumyati G., Concannon C., Beldavs Z., Cassidy P.M., Phipps E.C., Kenslow N., Hancock E.B., Kallen A.J.: Carbapenem-nonsusceptible Acinetobacter baumannii, 8 US metropolitan areas, 2012–2015. Emerging infectious diseases, 24, 727 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  113. Camarena L., Bruno V., Euskirchen G., Poggio S., Snyder M.: Molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced pathogenesis revealed by RNA-sequencing. PloS Pathog. 6, 4 (2010)
    [CROSSREF]
  114. Carruthers M.D., Nicholson P.A., Tracy E.N., Munson R.S. Jr.: Acinetobacter baumannii utilizes a type VI secretion system for bacterial competition. PLoS ONE, 8, 3 (2013)
    [CROSSREF]
  115. Castellanos N., Nakanouchi J., Yüzen D.I., Fung S., Fernandez J.S., Barberis C., Tuchscherr L., Ramirez M.S.: A study on Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus strains recovered from the same infection site of a diabetic patient. Curr. Microbiol. 76, 842–847 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  116. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States (2013) [cited 2017 Apr 24]
  117. Chakravarty B.: Genetic mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii: background, challenges and future prospects. Molecular biology reports, 47, 4037–4046 (2020)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  118. Chastre J., Fagon J.-Y.: Ventilator-associated pneumonia. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 165, 867–903 (2002)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  119. Chmielarczyk A., Pomorska-Wesołowska M., Romaniszyn D., Wójkowska-Mach J.: healthcare-associated laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infections-species diversity and resistance mechanisms, a four-year retrospective laboratory-based study in the South of Poland. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public health, 18, 2785 (2021)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  120. Clemmer K.M., Bonomo R.A., Rather P.N.: Genetic analysis of surface motility in Acinetobacter baumannii. Microbiology, 157, 2534–2544 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  121. Corradino B., Toia F., di Lorenzo S., Cordova A., Moschella F.: A difficult case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Acinetobacter baumannii. Int. J. Low Extrem. Wounds, 9, 152–154 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  122. Derecho I., McCoy K.B., Vaishampayan P., Venkateswaran K., Mogul R.: Characterization of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter species isolated during the Mars phoenix spacecraft assembly. Astrobiology, 14, 837–847 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  123. Dexter C., Murray G.L., Paulsen I.T., Peleg A.Y.: Community-acquire Acinetobacter baumannii: clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathogenesis. Expert Rev. Anti Infect. Ther. 13, 567–573 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  124. Dikshit N., Kale S.D., Khameneh H.J., Balamuralidhar V., Tang C.Y., Kumar P., Lim T.P., Tan T.T., Kwa A.L., Mortellaro A., Sukumaran B.: NLRP3 inflammasome pathway has a critical role in the host immunity against clinically relevant Acinetobacter baumannii pulmonary infection. Mucosal Immunol. 11, 257–272 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  125. Dubiel G., Kozłowski B., Deptuła A., Hryniewicz W.: Raport NPOA z programu czynnego monitorowania zakażeń w oddziałach anestezjologii i intensywnej terapii w 2018 roku w Polsce (2018)
  126. Dunlap C.A., Rooney A.P.: Acinetobacter dijkshoorniae is a later heterotypic synonym of Acinetobacter lactucae. International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology, 68, 131–132 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  127. Duszynska W., Litwin A., Rojek S., Szczesny A., Ciasullo A., Gozdzik W.: Analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii hospital infections in patients treated at the intensive care unit of the University Hospital, Wroclaw, Poland: a 6-year, single-center, retrospective study. Infect Drug Resist. 11, 629–635 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  128. Eijkelkamp B.A., Hassan K.A., Paulsen I.T., Brown M.H.: Investigation of the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii under iron limiting conditions. BMC Genomics, 12, 126 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  129. Elhosseiny N.M., Attia A.S.: Acinetobacter: an emerging pathogen with a versatile secretome. Emerg. Microbes Infect. 7, 1–15 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  130. Eliopoulos G.M., Maragakis L.L., Perl T.M.: Acinetobacter baumannii: epidemiology, antimicrobial resistance, and treatment options. Clinn. Infect. Dis. 46, 1254–1263 (2008)
    [CROSSREF]
  131. Erdem H., Cag Y., Gencer S., Uysal S., Karakurt Z., Harman R., Ulug M.: Treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by Acinetobacter: results of prospective and multicenter ID-IRI study. Eur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 39, 45–52 (2020)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  132. Flamm R.K., Rhomberg P.R., Jones R.N., Farrell D.J.: In vitro activity of RX-P873 against Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 59, 2280–2285 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  133. Gaddy J.A., Actis L.A.: Regulation of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation. Future Microbiol. 4, 273–278 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  134. García-Quintanilla M., Pulido M.R., López-Rojas R., Pachón J., McConnell M.J.: Emerging therapies for multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Trends in Microbiology, 21, 157–163 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  135. Garnacho-Montero J., Timsit J-F: Managing Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Curr. Opin. Infect. Dis. 32, 69–76 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  136. Gebhardt M.J., Gallagher L.A., Jacobson R.K., Usacheva E.A., Peterson L.R., Zurawski D.V., Shuman H.A.: Joint transcriptional control of virulence and resistance to antibiotic and environmental stress in Acinetobacter baumannii. MBio, 6, 1–12 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  137. Giammanco A., Cala C., Fasciana T., Dowzlcky M.: Global assessment of the activity of tigecycline against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens between 2004 and 2014 as part of the tigecycline evaluation and surveillance trial. Msphere, 2, 1 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  138. Gorylik-Salmonowicz A., Popowska M.: Occurence of the coselection phenomenon in non-clinical environments / Występowanie zjawiska koselekcji w środowiskach pozaklinicznych. Advancements of Microbiology, 58, 433–446 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  139. Grochowalska A., Kozioł-Montewka M., Oliynyk O., Krasij N.: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in view of the microbial properties of the ESKAPE group in neighbouring countries-Poland and Ukraine. J. Pre-Clin. Clin. Res. 11, 111–115 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  140. Henriksen S.D.: Moraxella, Acinetobacter, and the Mimae. Bacteriol. Rev. 37, 522–561 (1973)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  141. Henry R.: Etymologia: Acinetobacter. Emerg. Infect. Dis. 19, 841 (2013)
  142. Ho Y.H., Tseng C.C., Wang L.S., Chen Y.T., Ho G.J., Lin T.Y., Wang L.Y., Chen L.K.: Application of bacteriophage-containing aerosol against nosocomial transmission of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an intensive care unit. PloS One, 11, 12 (2016)
  143. Inchai J., Pothirat Ch., Bumroongkit Ch., Limsukon A., Khositsakulchai W., Liwsrisakun Ch.: Prognostic factors associated with mortality of drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii ventilator-associated pneumonia, J. Intensive Care, 3, 9 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  144. Isler B., Doi Y., Bonomo R.A., Paterson D.L.: New treatment options against carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Antimicrob. Agents Ch. 63, 1 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  145. Ivanković T., Goić-Barišić I., Hrenović J.: Reduced susceptibility to disinfectants of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms on glass and ceramic. Arh. Hig. Rada Toksiko. 68, 99–107 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  146. Jacobs A.C., Hood I., Boyd K.L., Olson P.D., Morrison J.M., Carson S., Dunman P.M.: Inactivation of phospholipase D diminishes Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis. Infect. Immun. 78, 1952–1962 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  147. Johnson T.L., Waack U., Smith S., Mobley H., Sandkvist M.: Acinetobacter baumannii is dependent on the type II secretion system and its substrate LipA for lipid utilization and in vivo fitness. J. Bacteriol. 198, 711–719 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  148. Kanafani Z.A., Kanj S.S.: Acinetobacter infection: Treatment and prevention, https://www.uptodate.com/contents/acinetobacter-infection-treatment-and-prevention (20.11.2018)
  149. Kim S., Lee D.W., Jin J.S., Kim J.: Antimicrobial activity of LysSS, a novel phage endolysin, against Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J. Global Antimicrob. Res. 22, 32–39 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  150. Koulenti D., Lisboa T., Brun-Buisson Ch., Krueger W.; Macor A., Sole-Violan J., Diaz E., Topeli A., DeWaele J., Carneiro A., Martin-Loeches I., Armaganidis A., Rello J.: Spectrum of practice in the diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia in patients requiring mechanical ventilation in European intensive care units. Critical care medicine, 37, 2360–2369 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  151. Kubler A., Adamiak B., Durek G., Mayzner-Zawadzka E., Gaszyński W., Karpel E., Duszyńska W.: Results of the severe sepsis registry in intensive care units in Poland from 2003–2009, Anaesthesion Intensive Ther. 47, 7–13 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  152. Lee C.R., Lee J.H., Park M., Park K.S., Bae I.K., Kim Y.B., Cha C.J., Jeong B.C., Lee S.H.: Biology of Acinetobacter baumannii: pathogenesis, antibiotic resistance mechanism, and prospective treatments options. Front. Cell. Infect. Microbiol. 13, 7–55 (2017)
  153. Lee J.C., Koerten H., Van den Broek P., Beekhuizen H., Wolterbeek R., Van den Barselaar M., van der Reijden T., van der Meer J., Dijkshoorn L.: Adherence of Acinetobacter baumannii strains to human bronchial epithelial cells. Res. Microbiol. 157, 360–366 (2006)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  154. Lessel E.F.: Subcommittee on nomenclature of Moraxella and allied bacteria. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 21, 213–214 (1971)
    [CROSSREF]
  155. Lin L., Tan B., Pantapalangkoor P., Ho T., Baquir B., Tomaras A., Fernandez L.: Inhibition of LpxC protects mice from resistant Acinetobacter baumannii by modulating inflammation and enhancing phagocytosis. MBio, 3, e00312–12 (2012)
  156. Longo F., Vuotto C., Donelli G.: Biofilm formation in Acinetobacter baumannii. New Microbiol. 37, 119–127 (2014)
    [PUBMED]
  157. Luke N.R., Sauberan S.L., Russo T.A., Beanan J.M., Olson R., Loehfelm T.W., Campagnari A.A.: Identification and characterization of a glycosyltransferase involved in Acinetobacter baumannii lipopolysaccharide core biosynthesis. Infect. Immun. 78, 2017–2023 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  158. Luna B.M., Yan J., Reyna Z., Moon E., Nielsen T.B., Reza H., Lu P., Bonomo R., Louie A., Drusano G., Bulitta J. She R., Spellberg B.: Natural history of Acinetobacter baumannii infection in mice. PloS One, 14, 7 (2019)
  159. Mahboubi M., Feizabadi M.M: Antimicrobial activity of some essential oils alone and in combination with amikacin against Acinetobacter sp. J. Mircobiol. Biot. Food Sci. 5, 412–415 (2016)
  160. Manchanda V., Sanchaita S., Singh N.P.: Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter. J. Glob. Infect. Dis. 2, 291 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  161. Mantilla-Calderon D., Plewa M.J., Michoud G., Fodelianakis S., Daffonchio D., Hong P.Y.: Water disinfection byproducts increase natural transformation rates of environmental DNA in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. Environ. Sci. Tech. 53, 6520–6528 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  162. Mantzarlis K., Makris D., Zakynthinos E.: Riskfactors for the firstepisode of Acinetobacter baumannii resistant to colistin infection and outcome in critically ill patients. J. Med. Microbiol. 69, 35–40 (2020)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  163. McConnell M.J., Actis L., Pachón J.: Acinetobacter baumannii: human infections, factors contributing to pathogenesis and Animals models. FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 37, 130–155 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  164. Mizerski W., Bednarczuk B., Kawalec M.: Słownik bakterii, red. Bednarczuk B., Adamantan, Warszawa (2008)
  165. Morris F.C., Dexter C., Kostoulias X., Uddin M.I., Peleg A.Y.: The mechanisms of disease caused by Acinetobacter baumannii. Front. Microbiol. 10, 1601 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  166. Murray P.R., Rosenthal K.S., Pfaller M.A.: Pseudomonas i bakterie podobne (w) Mikrobiologia, red. Przondo-Mordarska A., Martirosian G., Szkaradkiewicz A., Edra Urban & Partner, Wrocław, 325–332 (2016)
  167. Mussi M.A., Gaddy J.A., Cabruja M., Viale A.M., Rasia R., Actis L.A.: Motility, virulence and biofilm formation by the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii are affected by blue light. J. Bacteriol. 192, 6336–6345 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  168. Nairn B.L., Lonergan Z.R., Wang J., Braymer J.J., Zhang Y., Calcutt M.W., Lisher J.P., Gilston B.A., Chazin W.J., de Crecy-Lagard V., Giedroc D.P.: The response of Acinetobacter baumannii to zinc starvation. Cell Host Microbe, 19, 826–836 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  169. Namysłowska A., Laudy A.E., Tyski S.: Mechanizmy oporności Acinetobacter baumannii na związki przeciwbakteryjne. Post. Mikrobiol. 54, 392–406 (2015)
  170. Nemec A., Krizova L., Maixnerova M., Sedo O., Brisse S., Higgins P.G.: Acinetobacter seifertii sp. nov., a member of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolated from human clinical specimens. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Micr. 65, 934–942 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  171. Nwugo C.C., Arivett B.A., Zimbler D.L., Gaddy J.A., Richards A.M., Actis L.A.: Effect of ethanol on differential protein production and expression of potential virulence functions in the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. PloS One, 7, 12 (2012)
    [CROSSREF]
  172. O’Neill J.: Antimicrobial Resistance: Tackling a crisis for the health and wealth of nations. The review on antimicrobial resistance (2014)
  173. Papathanakos G., Andrianopoulos I., Papathanasiou A., Priavali E., Koulenti D., Koulouras V.: Colistin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia: a serious threat for critically ill patients. Microorganisms, 8, 287 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  174. Pelag A.Y., Seifert H., Petwrson D.L.: Acinetobacter baumannii: emergence of a successful pathogen. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 21, 538–582 (2008)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  175. Penwell W.F., DeGrace N., Tentarelli S., Gauthier L., Gilbert C.M., Arivett B.A., Miller A.A., Durand-Reville T., Jourbran C. Actis L.A.: Discovery and characterization of new hydroxamate siderophores, baumannoferrin A and B, produced by Acinetobacter baumannii. Chem. Biochem. 16, 1896–1904 (2015)
  176. Pires S., Peignier A., Seto J., Smyth D.S., Parker D.: Biological sex influences susceptibilillity to Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia in mice. JCI Insight. 5, e132223 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  177. Rafei R., Osman M., Dabboussi F., Hamze M.: Update on the epidemiological typing methods for Acinetobacter baumannii. Future Microbiol. 14, 1065–1080 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  178. Repizo G.D., Gagne S., Foucault-Grunenwald M.L., Borges V., Charpentier X., Limansky A.S., Salcedo S.P.: Differential role of the T6SS in Acinetobacter baumannii virulence. PLoS One, 10, 9 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  179. Reza A., Sutton J.M., Rahman K.M.: Effectiveness of efflux pump inhibitors as biofilm disruptors and resistance breakers in Gram-negative (ESKAPEE) bacteria. Antibiotics, 8, 4 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  180. Rice L.B.: Federal funding for the study of antimicrobial resistance in nosocomial pathogens: no ESKAPE. J. Infect. Dis. 197, 1079–1081 (2008)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  181. Roca Subirà I., Espinal P., Vila-Farrés X., Vila Estapé J.: The Acinetobacter baumannii oxymoron: commensal hospital dweller turned pan-drug-resistant menace. Front. Microbiol. 3, 148 (2012)
    [PUBMED]
  182. Santaniello A., Sansone M., Fioretti A., Menna L.F.: Systematic review and meta-analysis of the occurrence of ESKAPE bacteria group in dogs, and the related zoonotic risk in animal-assisted therapy, and in animal-assisted activity in the health context. Int. J. Env. Res. Public Health, 17, 3278 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  183. Schweppe D.K., Harding C., Chavez J.D., Wu X., Ramage E., Singh P.K., Manoil C., Bruce J.E.: Host-microbe protein interactions during bacterial infection. Chem. Biol. 22, 1521–1530 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  184. Šiširak M., Hukić M.: Acinetobacter baumannii as a cause of sepsis. MedGlas, 9, 311–316 (2012)
  185. Słoczyńska A., Wand M.E., Tyski S., Laudy A.E.: Analysis of blaCHDL Genes and Insertion Sequences Related to Carbapenem Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Strains Isolated in Warsaw, Poland. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 22, 2486 (2021)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  186. Smith M.G., Des Etages S.G., Snyder M.: Microbial synergy via anethanol-triggered pathway. Mol. Cell Biol. 24, 3874–3884 (2004)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  187. Spellberg B., Rex J.H.: The value of single-pathogen antibacterial agents. Nat. Rev. Drug Discov. 12, 963 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  188. Stahl J., Bergmann H., Gottig S., Ebersberger I., Averhoff B.: Acinetobacter baumannii virulence is mediated by the concerted action of three phospholipases D. PloS One, 10, 9 (2015)
  189. Szczypta A., Talaga-Ćwiertnia K., Kielar M., Krzyściak P., Gajewska A., Szura M., Bulanda M., Chmielarczyk A.: Investigation of Acinetobacter baumannii Activity in Vascular Surgery Units through Epidemiological Management Based on the Analysis of Antimicrobial Resistance, Biofilm Formation and Genotyping. Int. J. Env. Res. Pub. He. 18, 1563 (2021)
    [CROSSREF]
  190. Szewczyk E.M.: Zakażenia związane z opieką zdrowotną. (oraz) Sobiś-Glinkowska M., Różalska M.: Tlenowe pałeczki gram-ujemne (w) Diagnostyka bakteriologiczna, red. Szewczyk E.M., PWN, Warszawa (2019)
  191. Tacconelli E., Carrara E., Savoldi A., Harbarth S., Mendelson M., Monnet D.L., Zorzet A.: Discovery, research, and development of new antibiotics: the WHO priority list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and tuberculosis. Lancet Infect. Dis., 18, 318–327 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  192. Touchon M., Cury J., Yoon E.J., Krizova L., Cerqueira G.C., Murphy C., Feldgarden M., Wortman J., Clermont D., Lambert T., Grillot-Courvalin C., Nemec A., Courvalin P., Rocha E.P.C.: The genomic diversification of the whole Acinetobacter genus: origins, mechanisms, and consequences. Genome Biol. Evol. 6, 2866–2882 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  193. Traglia G.M., Place K., Dotto C., Fernandez J.S., Montaña S., dos Santos Bahiense C., Bonomo R.A.: Interspecies DNA acquisition by a naturally competent Acinetobacter baumannii strain. Int. J. Antimicrob. Ag. 53, 483–490 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  194. Van der Kolk J.H., Endimiani A., Graubner C., Gerber V., Perreten V.: Acinetobacter in veterinary medicine, with an emphasis on Acinetobacter baumannii. J. Glob. Antimicrob. Re, 16, 59–71 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  195. Veening J.W., Blokesch M.: Interbacterial predation as a strategy for DNA acquisition in naturally competent bacteria. Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 15, 621 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  196. Vincent J., Rello J., Marshall J., Silva E., Anzueto A., Martin C.D., Reinhart K.: International study of the prevalence and outcomes of infection in intensive care units. JAMA.; 302, 2323–2329 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  197. Wałaszek M., Różańska A., Bulanda M., Wójkowska-Mach J.: Alarmujące wyniki występowania szpitalnych zakażeń krwi w wieloośrodkowym programie nadzoru nad zakażeniami szpitalnymi w polskich oddziałach intensywnej terapii medycznej. Przegląd Epidemiol. 72, 33–44 (2018)
  198. Weber B.S., Kinsella R.L., Harding C.M., Feldman M.F.: The secrets of Acinetobacter secretion. Trends Microbiol. 25, 532–545 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  199. Weber B.S., Ly P.M., Irwin J.N., Pukatzki S., Feldman M.F.: A multidrug resistance plasmid contains the molecular switch for type VI secretion in Acinetobacter baumannii. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 112, 9442–9447 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  200. Wilharm G., Skiebe E., Higgins P.G., Poppel M.T., Blaschke U., Leser S., Jerzak L.: Relatedness of wildlife and livestock avian isolates of the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii to lineages spread in hospitals worldwide. Env. Microbiol. 19, 4349–4364 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  201. Wilks M., Wilson A., Warwisk S., Price E., Kennedz D., Elz A., Millar M.R.: Control of an Outbreak of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticuscolonization and infection in an intensive care unit (ICU) without closing the ICU or placing patients in isolation. Infect. Cont. Hosp. Ep. 27, 654–658 (2006)
    [CROSSREF]
  202. Wong D., Nielsen T.B., Bonomo R.A., Pantapalangkoor P., Luna B., Spellberg B.: Clinical and pathophysiological overview of Acinetobacter infections: a century of challenges. American Society for Microbiology. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 30, 409–447 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  203. Xu A., Zhu H., Gao B., Weng H., Ding Z., Li M., He G.: Diagnosis of severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Acinetobacter baumannii through next-generation sequencing: a case report. BMC Infect. Dis. 20, 1–7 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  204. Zimbler D.L., Penwell W.F., Gaddy J.A., Menke S.M., Tomaras A.P., Connerly P.L., Actis L.A.: Iron acquisition functions expressed by the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. Biometals, 22, 23–32 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
XML PDF Share

FIGURES & TABLES

Fig. 1.

Taxonomy of the species Acinetobacter baumannii

Based on Szewczyk et al. [88].

Full Size   |   Slide (.pptx)

Fig. 2.

Virulence factors of Acinetobacter baumannii and their role in pathogenesis.

Full Size   |   Slide (.pptx)

Ryc. 1.

Taksonomia gatunku Acinetobacter baumannii

Na podstawie Szewczyk i wsp. [88].

Full Size   |   Slide (.pptx)

Ryc. 2.

Czynniki wirulencji Acinetobacter baumannii oraz ich znaczenie w procesie patogenezy

Full Size   |   Slide (.pptx)

REFERENCES

  1. Al Atrouni A., Joly-Guillou M.L., Hamze M., Kempf M.: Reservoirs of non-baumannii Acinetobacter species. Front. Microbiol. 7, 49 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  2. Amaya-Villar R., Garnacho-Montero J.: How should we treat Acinetobacter pneumonia? Curr. Opin. Crit. Care, 25, 465–472 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  3. Antunes L.C., Imperi F., Towner K.J., Visca P.: Genome-assisted identification of putative iron-utilization genes in Acinetobacter baumannii and their distribution among a genotypically diverse collection of clinical isolates. Res. Microbiol. 162, 279–284 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  4. Asplund M.B., Coelho C., Cordero R.J., Martinez L.R.: Alcohol impairs J774.16 macrophage-like cell antimicrobial functions in Acinetobacter baumannii infection. Virulence, 4, 467–472 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  5. Association for professionals in infection control and epidemiology: guide to the elimination of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii transmission in healthcare settings, https://apic.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/APIC-AB-Guide.pdf (2010)
  6. Ayoub Moubareck C. i Hammoudi Halat D.: Insights into Acinetobacter baumannii: a review of microbiological, virulence, and resistance traits in a threatening nosocomial pathogen. Antibiotics, 9, 119 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  7. Basler M., Ho B.T., Mekalanos J.J.: Tit-for-tat: type VI secretion system counterattack during bacterial cell-cell interactions. Cell, 152, 884–894 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  8. Błaszczyk M.K.: Mikrobiologia środowisk, red. Mostowik K., PWN, Warszawa (2014)
  9. Bravo Z., Orruño M., Parada C., Kaberdin V.R., Barcina I., Arana I.: The long-term survival of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606T under nutrient-deprived conditions does not require the entry into the viable but non-culturable state. Arch. Microbiol. 198, 399–407 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  10. Bulens S.N., Sarah H.Y., Walters M.S., Jacob J.T., Bower C., Reno J., Wilson L., Vaeth E., Bamberg W., Janelle S.J., Lynfield R., Snippes Vagnone P., Shaw K., Kainer M., Muleta D., Mounsey J., Dumyati G., Concannon C., Beldavs Z., Cassidy P.M., Phipps E.C., Kenslow N., Hancock E.B., Kallen A.J.: Carbapenem-nonsusceptible Acinetobacter baumannii, 8 US metropolitan areas, 2012–2015. Emerging infectious diseases, 24, 727 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  11. Camarena L., Bruno V., Euskirchen G., Poggio S., Snyder M.: Molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced pathogenesis revealed by RNA-sequencing. PloS Pathog. 6, 4 (2010)
    [CROSSREF]
  12. Carruthers M.D., Nicholson P.A., Tracy E.N., Munson R.S. Jr.: Acinetobacter baumannii utilizes a type VI secretion system for bacterial competition. PLoS ONE, 8, 3 (2013)
    [CROSSREF]
  13. Castellanos N., Nakanouchi J., Yüzen D.I., Fung S., Fernandez J.S., Barberis C., Tuchscherr L., Ramirez M.S.: A study on Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus strains recovered from the same infection site of a diabetic patient. Curr. Microbiol. 76, 842–847 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  14. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States (2013) [cited 2017 Apr 24]
  15. Chakravarty B.: Genetic mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii: background, challenges and future prospects. Molecular biology reports, 47, 4037–4046 (2020)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  16. Chastre J., Fagon J.-Y.: Ventilator-associated pneumonia. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 165, 867–903 (2002)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  17. Chmielarczyk A., Pomorska-Wesołowska M., Romaniszyn D., Wójkowska-Mach J.: healthcare-associated laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infections-species diversity and resistance mechanisms, a four-year retrospective laboratory-based study in the South of Poland. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public health, 18, 2785 (2021)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  18. Clemmer K.M., Bonomo R.A., Rather P.N.: Genetic analysis of surface motility in Acinetobacter baumannii. Microbiology, 157, 2534–2544 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  19. Corradino B., Toia F., di Lorenzo S., Cordova A., Moschella F.: A difficult case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Acinetobacter baumannii. Int. J. Low Extrem. Wounds, 9, 152–154 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  20. Derecho I., McCoy K.B., Vaishampayan P., Venkateswaran K., Mogul R.: Characterization of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter species isolated during the Mars phoenix spacecraft assembly. Astrobiology, 14, 837–847 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  21. Dexter C., Murray G.L., Paulsen I.T., Peleg A.Y.: Community-acquire Acinetobacter baumannii: clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathogenesis. Expert Rev. Anti Infect. Ther. 13, 567–573 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  22. Dikshit N., Kale S.D., Khameneh H.J., Balamuralidhar V., Tang C.Y., Kumar P., Lim T.P., Tan T.T., Kwa A.L., Mortellaro A., Sukumaran B.: NLRP3 inflammasome pathway has a critical role in the host immunity against clinically relevant Acinetobacter baumannii pulmonary infection. Mucosal Immunol. 11, 257–272 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  23. Dubiel G., Kozłowski B., Deptuła A., Hryniewicz W.: Raport NPOA z programu czynnego monitorowania zakażeń w oddziałach anestezjologii i intensywnej terapii w 2018 roku w Polsce (2018)
  24. Dunlap C.A., Rooney A.P.: Acinetobacter dijkshoorniae is a later heterotypic synonym of Acinetobacter lactucae. International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology, 68, 131–132 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  25. Duszynska W., Litwin A., Rojek S., Szczesny A., Ciasullo A., Gozdzik W.: Analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii hospital infections in patients treated at the intensive care unit of the University Hospital, Wroclaw, Poland: a 6-year, single-center, retrospective study. Infect Drug Resist. 11, 629–635 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  26. Eijkelkamp B.A., Hassan K.A., Paulsen I.T., Brown M.H.: Investigation of the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii under iron limiting conditions. BMC Genomics, 12, 126 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  27. Elhosseiny N.M., Attia A.S.: Acinetobacter: an emerging pathogen with a versatile secretome. Emerg. Microbes Infect. 7, 1–15 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  28. Eliopoulos G.M., Maragakis L.L., Perl T.M.: Acinetobacter baumannii: epidemiology, antimicrobial resistance, and treatment options. Clinn. Infect. Dis. 46, 1254–1263 (2008)
    [CROSSREF]
  29. Erdem H., Cag Y., Gencer S., Uysal S., Karakurt Z., Harman R., Ulug M.: Treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by Acinetobacter: results of prospective and multicenter ID-IRI study. Eur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 39, 45–52 2020)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  30. Flamm R.K., Rhomberg P.R., Jones R.N., Farrell D.J.: In vitro activity of RX-P873 against Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 59, 2280–2285 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  31. Gaddy J.A., Actis L.A.: Regulation of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation. Future Microbiol. 4, 273–278 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  32. García-Quintanilla M., Pulido M.R., López-Rojas R., Pachón J., McConnell M.J.: Emerging therapies for multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Trends in Microbiology, 21, 157–163 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  33. Garnacho-Montero J., Timsit J-F: Managing Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Curr. Opin. Infect. Dis. 32, 69–76 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  34. Gebhardt M.J., Gallagher L.A., Jacobson R.K., Usacheva E.A., Peterson L.R., Zurawski D.V., Shuman H.A.: Joint transcriptional control of virulence and resistance to antibiotic and environmental stress in Acinetobacter baumannii. MBio, 6, 1–12 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  35. Giammanco A., Cala C., Fasciana T., Dowzlcky M.: Global assessment of the activity of tigecycline against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens between 2004 and 2014 as part of the tigecycline evaluation and surveillance trial. Msphere, 2, 1 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  36. Gorylik-Salmonowicz A., Popowska M.: Occurence of the coselection phenomenon in non-clinical environments / Występowanie zjawiska koselekcji w środowiskach pozaklinicznych. Advancements of Microbiology, 58, 433–446 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  37. Grochowalska A., Kozioł-Montewka M., Oliynyk O., Krasij N.: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in view of the microbial properties of the ESKAPE group in neighbouring countries – Poland and Ukraine. J. Pre-Clin. Clin. Res. 11, 111–115 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  38. Henriksen S.D.: Moraxella, Acinetobacter, and the Mimae. Bacteriol. Rev. 37, 522–561 (1973)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  39. Henry R.: Etymologia: Acinetobacter. Emerg. Infect. Dis. 19, 841 (2013)
  40. Ho Y.H., Tseng C.C., Wang L.S., Chen Y.T., Ho G.J., Lin T.Y., Wang L.Y., Chen L.K.: Application of bacteriophage-containing aerosol against nosocomial transmission of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an intensive care unit. PloS One, 11, 12 (2016)
  41. Inchai J., Pothirat Ch., Bumroongkit Ch., Limsukon A., Khositsakulchai W., Liwsrisakun Ch.: Prognostic factors associated with mortality of drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii ventilator-associated pneumonia, J. Intensive Care, 3, 9 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  42. Isler B., Doi Y., Bonomo R.A., Paterson D.L.: New treatment options against carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Antimicrob. Agents Ch. 63, 1 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  43. Ivanković T., Goić-Barišić I., Hrenović J.: Reduced susceptibility to disinfectants of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms on glass and ceramic. Arh. Hig. Rada Toksiko. 68, 99–107 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  44. Jacobs A.C., Hood I., Boyd K.L., Olson P.D., Morrison J.M., Carson S., Dunman P.M.: Inactivation of phospholipase D diminishes Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis. Infect. Immun. 78, 1952–1962 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  45. Johnson T.L., Waack U., Smith S., Mobley H., Sandkvist M.: Acinetobacter baumannii is dependent on the type II secretion system and its substrate LipA for lipid utilization and in vivo fitness. J. Bacteriol. 198, 711–719 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  46. Kanafani Z.A., Kanj S.S.: Acinetobacter infection: Treatment and prevention, https://www.uptodate.com/contents/acinetobacter-infection-treatment-and-prevention (20.11.2018)
  47. Kim S., Lee D.W., Jin J.S., Kim J.: Antimicrobial activity of LysSS, a novel phage endolysin, against Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J. Global Antimicrob. Res. 22, 32–39 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  48. Koulenti D., Lisboa T., Brun-Buisson Ch., Krueger W.; Macor A., Sole-Violan J., Diaz E., Topeli A., DeWaele J., Carneiro A., Martin-Loeches I., Armaganidis A., Rello J.: Spectrum of practice in the diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia in patients requiring mechanical ventilation in European intensive care units. Critical care medicine, 37, 2360–2369 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  49. Kubler A., Adamiak B., Durek G., Mayzner-Zawadzka E., Gaszyński W., Karpel E., Duszyńska W.: Results of the severe sepsis registry in intensive care units in Poland from 2003–2009, Anaesthesion Intensive Ther. 47, 7–13 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  50. Lee C.R., Lee J.H., Park M., Park K.S., Bae I.K., Kim Y.B., Cha C.J., Jeong B.C., Lee S.H.: Biology of Acinetobacter baumannii: pathogenesis, antibiotic resistance mechanism, and prospective treatments options. Front. Cell. Infect. Microbiol. 13, 7–55 (2017)
  51. Lee J.C., Koerten H., Van den Broek P., Beekhuizen H., Wolterbeek R., Van den Barselaar M., van der Reijden T., van der Meer J., Dijkshoorn, L.: Adherence of Acinetobacter baumannii strains to human bronchial epithelial cells. Res. Microbiol. 157, 360–366 (2006)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  52. Lessel E.F.: Subcommittee on nomenclature of Moraxella and allied bacteria. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 21, 213–214 (1971)
    [CROSSREF]
  53. Lin L., Tan B., Pantapalangkoor P., Ho T., Baquir B., Tomaras A., Fernandez L.: Inhibition of LpxC protects mice from resistant Acinetobacter baumannii by modulating inflammation and enhancing phagocytosis. MBio, 3, e00312–12 (2012)
  54. Longo F., Vuotto C., Donelli G.: Biofilm formation in Acinetobacter baumannii. New Microbiol. 37, 119–127 (2014)
    [PUBMED]
  55. Luke N.R., Sauberan S.L., Russo T.A., Beanan J.M., Olson R., Loehfelm T.W., Campagnari A.A.: Identification and characterization of a glycosyltransferase involved in Acinetobacter baumannii lipopolysaccharide core biosynthesis. Infect. Immun. 78, 2017–2023 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  56. Luna B.M., Yan J., Reyna Z., Moon E., Nielsen T.B., Reza H., Lu P., Bonomo R., Louie A., Drusano G., Bulitta J. She R., Spellberg B.: Natural history of Acinetobacter baumannii infection in mice. PloS One, 14, 7 (2019)
  57. Mahboubi M., Feizabadi M.M: Antimicrobial activity of some essential oils alone and in combination with amikacin against Acinetobacter sp. J. Mircobiol. Biot. Food Sci. 5, 412–415 (2016)
  58. Manchanda V., Sanchaita S., Singh N.P.: Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter. J. Glob. Infect. Dis. 2, 291 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  59. Mantilla-Calderon D., Plewa M.J., Michoud G., Fodelianakis S., Daffonchio D., Hong P.Y.: Water disinfection byproducts increase natural transformation rates of environmental DNA in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. Environ. Sci. Tech. 53, 6520–6528 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  60. Mantzarlis K., Makris D., Zakynthinos E.: Riskfactors for the firstepisode of Acinetobacter baumannii resistant to colistin infection and outcome in critically ill patients. J. Med. Microbiol. 69, 35–40 (2020)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  61. McConnell M.J., Actis L., Pachón J.: Acinetobacter baumannii: human infections, factors contributing to pathogenesis and Animals models. FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 37, 130–155 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  62. Mizerski W., Bednarczuk B., Kawalec M.: Słownik bakterii, red. Bednarczuk B., Adamantan, Warszawa (2008)
  63. Morris F.C., Dexter C., Kostoulias X., Uddin M.I., Peleg A.Y.: The mechanisms of disease caused by Acinetobacter baumannii. Front. Microbiol. 10, 1601 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  64. Murray P.R., Rosenthal K.S., Pfaller M.A.: Pseudomonas i bakterie podobne (w) Mikrobiologia, red. Przondo-Mordarska A., Martirosian G., Szkaradkiewicz A., Edra Urban & Partner, Wrocław, 325–332 (2016)
  65. Mussi M.A., Gaddy J.A., Cabruja M., Viale A.M., Rasia R., Actis L.A.: Motility, virulence and biofilm formation by the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii are affected by blue light. J. Bacteriol. 192, 6336–6345 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  66. Nairn B.L., Lonergan Z.R., Wang J., Braymer J.J., Zhang Y., Calcutt M.W., Lisher J.P., Gilston B.A., Chazin W.J., de Crecy-Lagard V., Giedroc D.P.: The response of Acinetobacter baumannii to zinc starvation. Cell Host Microbe, 19, 826–836 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  67. Namysłowska A., Laudy A.E., Tyski S.: Mechanizmy oporności Acinetobacter baumannii na związki przeciwbakteryjne. Post. Mikrobiol. 54, 392–406 (2015)
  68. Nemec A., Krizova L., Maixnerova M., Sedo O., Brisse S., Higgins P.G.: Acinetobacter seifertii sp. nov., a member of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolated from human clinical specimens. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Micr. 65, 934–942 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  69. Nwugo C.C., Arivett B.A., Zimbler D.L., Gaddy J.A., Richards A.M., Actis L.A.: Effect of ethanol on differential protein production and expression of potential virulence functions in the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. PloS One, 7, 12 (2012)
    [CROSSREF]
  70. O’Neill J.: Antimicrobial Resistance: Tackling a crisis for the health and wealth of nations. The review on antimicrobial resistance (2014)
  71. Papathanakos G., Andrianopoulos I., Papathanasiou A., Priavali E., Koulenti D., Koulouras V.: Colistin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia: a serious threat for critically ill patients. Microorganisms, 8, 287 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  72. Pelag A.Y., Seifert H., Petwrson D.L.: Acinetobacter baumannii: emergence of a successful pathogen. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 21, 538–582 (2008)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  73. Penwell W.F., DeGrace N., Tentarelli S., Gauthier L., Gilbert C.M., Arivett B.A., Miller A.A., Durand-Reville T., Jourbran C. Actis L.A.: Discovery and characterization of new hydroxamate siderophores, baumannoferrin A and B, produced by Acinetobacter baumannii. Chem. Biochem. 16, 1896–1904 (2015)
  74. Pires S., Peignier A., Seto J., Smyth D.S., Parker D.: Biological sex influences susceptibilillity to Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia in mice. JCI Insight. 5, e132223 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  75. Rafei R., Osman M., Dabboussi F., Hamze M.: Update on the epidemiological typing methods for Acinetobacter baumannii. Future Microbiol. 14, 1065–1080 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  76. Repizo G.D., Gagne S., Foucault-Grunenwald M.L., Borges V., Charpentier X., Limansky A.S., Salcedo S.P.: Differential role of the T6SS in Acinetobacter baumannii virulence. PLoS One, 10, 9 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  77. Reza A., Sutton J.M., Rahman K.M.: Effectiveness of efflux pump inhibitors as biofilm disruptors and resistance breakers in Gram-negative (ESKAPEE) bacteria. Antibiotics, 8, 4 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  78. Rice L.B.: Federal funding for the study of antimicrobial resistance in nosocomial pathogens: no ESKAPE. J. Infect. Dis. 197, 1079–1081 (2008)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  79. Roca Subirà I., Espinal P., Vila-Farrés X., Vila Estapé J.: The Acinetobacter baumannii oxymoron: commensal hospital dweller turned pan-drug-resistant menace. Front. Microbiol. 3, 148 (2012)
    [PUBMED]
  80. Santaniello A., Sansone M., Fioretti A., Menna L.F.: Systematic review and meta-analysis of the occurrence of ESKAPE bacteria group in dogs, and the related zoonotic risk in animal-assisted therapy, and in animal-assisted activity in the health context. Int. J. Env. Res. Public Health, 17, 3278 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  81. Schweppe D.K., Harding C., Chavez J.D., Wu X., Ramage E., Singh P.K., Manoil C., Bruce J.E.: Host-microbe protein interactions during bacterial infection. Chem. Biol. 22, 1521–1530 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  82. Šiširak M., Hukić M.: Acinetobacter baumannii as a cause of sepsis. MedGlas, 9, 311–316 (2012)
  83. Słoczyńska A., Wand M.E., Tyski S., Laudy A.E.: Analysis of blaCHDL Genes and Insertion Sequences Related to Carbapenem Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Strains Isolated in Warsaw, Poland. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 22, 2486 (2021)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  84. Smith M.G., Des Etages S.G., Snyder M.: Microbial synergy via anethanol-triggered pathway. Mol. Cell Biol. 24, 3874–3884 (2004)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  85. Spellberg B., Rex J.H.: The value of single-pathogen antibacterial agents. Nat. Rev. Drug Discov. 12, 963 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  86. Stahl J., Bergmann H., Gottig S., Ebersberger I., Averhoff B.: Acinetobacter baumannii virulence is mediated by the concerted action of three phospholipases D. PloS One, 10, 9 (2015)
  87. Szczypta A., Talaga-Ćwiertnia K., Kielar M., Krzyściak P., Gajewska A., Szura M., Bulanda M., Chmielarczyk A.: Investigation of Acinetobacter baumannii Activity in Vascular Surgery Units through Epidemiological Management Based on the Analysis of Antimicrobial Resistance, Biofilm Formation and Genotyping. Int. J. Env. Res. Pub. He. 18, 1563 (2021)
    [CROSSREF]
  88. Szewczyk E.M.: Zakażenia związane z opieką zdrowotną. (oraz) Sobiś-Glinkowska M., Różalska M.: Tlenowe pałeczki gram-ujemne (w) Diagnostyka bakteriologiczna, red. Szewczyk E.M., PWN, Warszawa (2019)
  89. Tacconelli E., Carrara E., Savoldi A., Harbarth S., Mendelson M., Monnet D.L., Zorzet A.: Discovery, research, and development of new antibiotics: the WHO priority list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and tuberculosis. Lancet Infect. Dis. 18, 318–327 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  90. Touchon M., Cury J., Yoon E.J., Krizova L., Cerqueira G.C., Murphy C., Feldgarden M., Wortman J., Clermont D., Lambert T., Grillot-Courvalin C., Nemec A., Courvalin P., Rocha E.P.C.: The genomic diversification of the whole Acinetobacter genus: origins, mechanisms, and consequences. Genome Biol. Evol. 6, 2866–2882 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  91. Traglia G.M., Place K., Dotto C., Fernandez J.S., Montaña S., dos Santos Bahiense C., Bonomo R.A.: Interspecies DNA acquisition by a naturally competent Acinetobacter baumannii strain. Int. J. Antimicrob. Ag. 53, 483–490 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  92. Van der Kolk J.H., Endimiani A., Graubner C., Gerber V., Perreten V.: Acinetobacter in veterinary medicine, with an emphasis on Acinetobacter baumannii. J. Glob. Antimicrob. Re, 16, 59–71 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  93. Veening J.W., Blokesch M.: Interbacterial predation as a strategy for DNA acquisition in naturally competent bacteria. Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 15, 621 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  94. Vincent J., Rello J., Marshall J., Silva E., Anzueto A., Martin C.D., Reinhart K.: International study of the prevalence and outcomes of infection in intensive care units. JAMA.; 302, 2323–2329 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  95. Wałaszek M., Różańska A., Bulanda M., Wójkowska-Mach J.: Alarmujące wyniki występowania szpitalnych zakażeń krwi w wieloośrodkowym programie nadzoru nad zakażeniami szpitalnymi w polskich oddziałach intensywnej terapii medycznej. Przegląd Epidemiol. 72, 33–44 (2018)
  96. Weber B.S., Kinsella R.L., Harding C.M., Feldman M.F.: The secrets of Acinetobacter secretion. Trends Microbiol. 25, 532–545 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  97. Weber B.S., Ly P.M., Irwin J.N., Pukatzki S., Feldman M.F.: A multidrug resistance plasmid contains the molecular switch for type VI secretion in Acinetobacter baumannii. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 112, 9442–9447 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  98. Wilharm G., Skiebe E., Higgins P.G., Poppel M.T., Blaschke U., Leser S., Jerzak L.: Relatedness of wildlife and livestock avian isolates of the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii to lineages spread in hospitals worldwide. Env. Microbiol. 19, 4349–4364 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  99. Wilks M., Wilson A., Warwisk S., Price E., Kennedz D., Elz A., Millar M.R.: Control of an Outbreak of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticuscolonization and infection in an intensive care unit (ICU) without closing the ICU or placing patients in isolation. Infect. Cont. Hosp. Ep. 27, 654–658 (2006)
    [CROSSREF]
  100. Wong D., Nielsen T.B., Bonomo R.A., Pantapalangkoor P., Luna B., Spellberg B.: Clinical and pathophysiological overview of Acinetobacter infections: a century of challenges. American Society for Microbiology. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 30, 409–447 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  101. Xu A., Zhu H., Gao B., Weng H., Ding Z., Li M., He G.: Diagnosis of severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Acinetobacter baumannii through next-generation sequencing: a case report. BMC Infect. Dis. 20, 1–7 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  102. Zimbler D.L., Penwell W.F., Gaddy J.A., Menke S.M., Tomaras A.P., Connerly P.L., Actis L.A.: Iron acquisition functions expressed by the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. Biometals, 22, 23–32 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  103. Al Atrouni A., Joly-Guillou M.L., Hamze M., Kempf M.: Reservoirs of non-baumannii Acinetobacter species. Front. Microbiol. 7, 49 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  104. Amaya-Villar R., Garnacho-Montero J.: How should we treat Acinetobacter pneumonia? Curr. Opin. Crit. Care, 25, 465–472 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  105. Antunes L.C., Imperi F., Towner K.J., Visca P.: Genome-assisted identification of putative iron-utilization genes in Acinetobacter baumannii and their distribution among a genotypically diverse collection of clinical isolates. Res. Microbiol. 162, 279–284 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  106. Asplund M.B., Coelho C., Cordero R.J., Martinez L.R.: Alcohol impairs J774.16 macrophage-like cell antimicrobial functions in Acinetobacter baumannii infection. Virulence, 4, 467–472 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  107. Association for professionals in infection control and epidemiology: guide to the elimination of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii transmission in healthcare settings, https://apic.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/APIC-AB-Guide.pdf (2010)
  108. Ayoub Moubareck C. i Hammoudi Halat D.: Insights into Acinetobacter baumannii: a review of microbiological, virulence, and resistance traits in a threatening nosocomial pathogen. Antibiotics, 9, 119 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  109. Basler M., Ho B.T., Mekalanos J.J.: Tit-for-tat: type VI secretion system counterattack during bacterial cell-cell interactions. Cell, 152, 884–894 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  110. Błaszczyk M.K.: Mikrobiologia środowisk, red. Mostowik K., PWN, Warszawa (2014)
  111. Bravo Z., Orruño M., Parada C., Kaberdin V.R., Barcina I., Arana I.: The long-term survival of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606T under nutrient-deprived conditions does not require the entry into the viable but non-culturable state. Arch. Microbiol. 198, 399–407 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  112. Bulens S.N., Sarah H.Y., Walters M.S., Jacob J.T., Bower C., Reno J., Wilson L., Vaeth E., Bamberg W., Janelle S.J., Lynfield R., Snippes Vagnone P., Shaw K., Kainer M., Muleta D., Mounsey J., Dumyati G., Concannon C., Beldavs Z., Cassidy P.M., Phipps E.C., Kenslow N., Hancock E.B., Kallen A.J.: Carbapenem-nonsusceptible Acinetobacter baumannii, 8 US metropolitan areas, 2012–2015. Emerging infectious diseases, 24, 727 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  113. Camarena L., Bruno V., Euskirchen G., Poggio S., Snyder M.: Molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced pathogenesis revealed by RNA-sequencing. PloS Pathog. 6, 4 (2010)
    [CROSSREF]
  114. Carruthers M.D., Nicholson P.A., Tracy E.N., Munson R.S. Jr.: Acinetobacter baumannii utilizes a type VI secretion system for bacterial competition. PLoS ONE, 8, 3 (2013)
    [CROSSREF]
  115. Castellanos N., Nakanouchi J., Yüzen D.I., Fung S., Fernandez J.S., Barberis C., Tuchscherr L., Ramirez M.S.: A study on Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus strains recovered from the same infection site of a diabetic patient. Curr. Microbiol. 76, 842–847 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  116. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States (2013) [cited 2017 Apr 24]
  117. Chakravarty B.: Genetic mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii: background, challenges and future prospects. Molecular biology reports, 47, 4037–4046 (2020)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  118. Chastre J., Fagon J.-Y.: Ventilator-associated pneumonia. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 165, 867–903 (2002)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  119. Chmielarczyk A., Pomorska-Wesołowska M., Romaniszyn D., Wójkowska-Mach J.: healthcare-associated laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infections-species diversity and resistance mechanisms, a four-year retrospective laboratory-based study in the South of Poland. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public health, 18, 2785 (2021)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  120. Clemmer K.M., Bonomo R.A., Rather P.N.: Genetic analysis of surface motility in Acinetobacter baumannii. Microbiology, 157, 2534–2544 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  121. Corradino B., Toia F., di Lorenzo S., Cordova A., Moschella F.: A difficult case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Acinetobacter baumannii. Int. J. Low Extrem. Wounds, 9, 152–154 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  122. Derecho I., McCoy K.B., Vaishampayan P., Venkateswaran K., Mogul R.: Characterization of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter species isolated during the Mars phoenix spacecraft assembly. Astrobiology, 14, 837–847 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  123. Dexter C., Murray G.L., Paulsen I.T., Peleg A.Y.: Community-acquire Acinetobacter baumannii: clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathogenesis. Expert Rev. Anti Infect. Ther. 13, 567–573 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  124. Dikshit N., Kale S.D., Khameneh H.J., Balamuralidhar V., Tang C.Y., Kumar P., Lim T.P., Tan T.T., Kwa A.L., Mortellaro A., Sukumaran B.: NLRP3 inflammasome pathway has a critical role in the host immunity against clinically relevant Acinetobacter baumannii pulmonary infection. Mucosal Immunol. 11, 257–272 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  125. Dubiel G., Kozłowski B., Deptuła A., Hryniewicz W.: Raport NPOA z programu czynnego monitorowania zakażeń w oddziałach anestezjologii i intensywnej terapii w 2018 roku w Polsce (2018)
  126. Dunlap C.A., Rooney A.P.: Acinetobacter dijkshoorniae is a later heterotypic synonym of Acinetobacter lactucae. International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology, 68, 131–132 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  127. Duszynska W., Litwin A., Rojek S., Szczesny A., Ciasullo A., Gozdzik W.: Analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii hospital infections in patients treated at the intensive care unit of the University Hospital, Wroclaw, Poland: a 6-year, single-center, retrospective study. Infect Drug Resist. 11, 629–635 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  128. Eijkelkamp B.A., Hassan K.A., Paulsen I.T., Brown M.H.: Investigation of the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii under iron limiting conditions. BMC Genomics, 12, 126 (2011)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  129. Elhosseiny N.M., Attia A.S.: Acinetobacter: an emerging pathogen with a versatile secretome. Emerg. Microbes Infect. 7, 1–15 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  130. Eliopoulos G.M., Maragakis L.L., Perl T.M.: Acinetobacter baumannii: epidemiology, antimicrobial resistance, and treatment options. Clinn. Infect. Dis. 46, 1254–1263 (2008)
    [CROSSREF]
  131. Erdem H., Cag Y., Gencer S., Uysal S., Karakurt Z., Harman R., Ulug M.: Treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by Acinetobacter: results of prospective and multicenter ID-IRI study. Eur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 39, 45–52 (2020)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  132. Flamm R.K., Rhomberg P.R., Jones R.N., Farrell D.J.: In vitro activity of RX-P873 against Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 59, 2280–2285 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  133. Gaddy J.A., Actis L.A.: Regulation of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation. Future Microbiol. 4, 273–278 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  134. García-Quintanilla M., Pulido M.R., López-Rojas R., Pachón J., McConnell M.J.: Emerging therapies for multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Trends in Microbiology, 21, 157–163 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  135. Garnacho-Montero J., Timsit J-F: Managing Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Curr. Opin. Infect. Dis. 32, 69–76 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  136. Gebhardt M.J., Gallagher L.A., Jacobson R.K., Usacheva E.A., Peterson L.R., Zurawski D.V., Shuman H.A.: Joint transcriptional control of virulence and resistance to antibiotic and environmental stress in Acinetobacter baumannii. MBio, 6, 1–12 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  137. Giammanco A., Cala C., Fasciana T., Dowzlcky M.: Global assessment of the activity of tigecycline against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens between 2004 and 2014 as part of the tigecycline evaluation and surveillance trial. Msphere, 2, 1 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  138. Gorylik-Salmonowicz A., Popowska M.: Occurence of the coselection phenomenon in non-clinical environments / Występowanie zjawiska koselekcji w środowiskach pozaklinicznych. Advancements of Microbiology, 58, 433–446 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  139. Grochowalska A., Kozioł-Montewka M., Oliynyk O., Krasij N.: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in view of the microbial properties of the ESKAPE group in neighbouring countries-Poland and Ukraine. J. Pre-Clin. Clin. Res. 11, 111–115 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  140. Henriksen S.D.: Moraxella, Acinetobacter, and the Mimae. Bacteriol. Rev. 37, 522–561 (1973)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  141. Henry R.: Etymologia: Acinetobacter. Emerg. Infect. Dis. 19, 841 (2013)
  142. Ho Y.H., Tseng C.C., Wang L.S., Chen Y.T., Ho G.J., Lin T.Y., Wang L.Y., Chen L.K.: Application of bacteriophage-containing aerosol against nosocomial transmission of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an intensive care unit. PloS One, 11, 12 (2016)
  143. Inchai J., Pothirat Ch., Bumroongkit Ch., Limsukon A., Khositsakulchai W., Liwsrisakun Ch.: Prognostic factors associated with mortality of drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii ventilator-associated pneumonia, J. Intensive Care, 3, 9 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  144. Isler B., Doi Y., Bonomo R.A., Paterson D.L.: New treatment options against carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Antimicrob. Agents Ch. 63, 1 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  145. Ivanković T., Goić-Barišić I., Hrenović J.: Reduced susceptibility to disinfectants of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms on glass and ceramic. Arh. Hig. Rada Toksiko. 68, 99–107 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  146. Jacobs A.C., Hood I., Boyd K.L., Olson P.D., Morrison J.M., Carson S., Dunman P.M.: Inactivation of phospholipase D diminishes Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis. Infect. Immun. 78, 1952–1962 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  147. Johnson T.L., Waack U., Smith S., Mobley H., Sandkvist M.: Acinetobacter baumannii is dependent on the type II secretion system and its substrate LipA for lipid utilization and in vivo fitness. J. Bacteriol. 198, 711–719 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  148. Kanafani Z.A., Kanj S.S.: Acinetobacter infection: Treatment and prevention, https://www.uptodate.com/contents/acinetobacter-infection-treatment-and-prevention (20.11.2018)
  149. Kim S., Lee D.W., Jin J.S., Kim J.: Antimicrobial activity of LysSS, a novel phage endolysin, against Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J. Global Antimicrob. Res. 22, 32–39 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  150. Koulenti D., Lisboa T., Brun-Buisson Ch., Krueger W.; Macor A., Sole-Violan J., Diaz E., Topeli A., DeWaele J., Carneiro A., Martin-Loeches I., Armaganidis A., Rello J.: Spectrum of practice in the diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia in patients requiring mechanical ventilation in European intensive care units. Critical care medicine, 37, 2360–2369 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  151. Kubler A., Adamiak B., Durek G., Mayzner-Zawadzka E., Gaszyński W., Karpel E., Duszyńska W.: Results of the severe sepsis registry in intensive care units in Poland from 2003–2009, Anaesthesion Intensive Ther. 47, 7–13 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  152. Lee C.R., Lee J.H., Park M., Park K.S., Bae I.K., Kim Y.B., Cha C.J., Jeong B.C., Lee S.H.: Biology of Acinetobacter baumannii: pathogenesis, antibiotic resistance mechanism, and prospective treatments options. Front. Cell. Infect. Microbiol. 13, 7–55 (2017)
  153. Lee J.C., Koerten H., Van den Broek P., Beekhuizen H., Wolterbeek R., Van den Barselaar M., van der Reijden T., van der Meer J., Dijkshoorn L.: Adherence of Acinetobacter baumannii strains to human bronchial epithelial cells. Res. Microbiol. 157, 360–366 (2006)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  154. Lessel E.F.: Subcommittee on nomenclature of Moraxella and allied bacteria. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 21, 213–214 (1971)
    [CROSSREF]
  155. Lin L., Tan B., Pantapalangkoor P., Ho T., Baquir B., Tomaras A., Fernandez L.: Inhibition of LpxC protects mice from resistant Acinetobacter baumannii by modulating inflammation and enhancing phagocytosis. MBio, 3, e00312–12 (2012)
  156. Longo F., Vuotto C., Donelli G.: Biofilm formation in Acinetobacter baumannii. New Microbiol. 37, 119–127 (2014)
    [PUBMED]
  157. Luke N.R., Sauberan S.L., Russo T.A., Beanan J.M., Olson R., Loehfelm T.W., Campagnari A.A.: Identification and characterization of a glycosyltransferase involved in Acinetobacter baumannii lipopolysaccharide core biosynthesis. Infect. Immun. 78, 2017–2023 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  158. Luna B.M., Yan J., Reyna Z., Moon E., Nielsen T.B., Reza H., Lu P., Bonomo R., Louie A., Drusano G., Bulitta J. She R., Spellberg B.: Natural history of Acinetobacter baumannii infection in mice. PloS One, 14, 7 (2019)
  159. Mahboubi M., Feizabadi M.M: Antimicrobial activity of some essential oils alone and in combination with amikacin against Acinetobacter sp. J. Mircobiol. Biot. Food Sci. 5, 412–415 (2016)
  160. Manchanda V., Sanchaita S., Singh N.P.: Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter. J. Glob. Infect. Dis. 2, 291 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  161. Mantilla-Calderon D., Plewa M.J., Michoud G., Fodelianakis S., Daffonchio D., Hong P.Y.: Water disinfection byproducts increase natural transformation rates of environmental DNA in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. Environ. Sci. Tech. 53, 6520–6528 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  162. Mantzarlis K., Makris D., Zakynthinos E.: Riskfactors for the firstepisode of Acinetobacter baumannii resistant to colistin infection and outcome in critically ill patients. J. Med. Microbiol. 69, 35–40 (2020)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  163. McConnell M.J., Actis L., Pachón J.: Acinetobacter baumannii: human infections, factors contributing to pathogenesis and Animals models. FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 37, 130–155 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  164. Mizerski W., Bednarczuk B., Kawalec M.: Słownik bakterii, red. Bednarczuk B., Adamantan, Warszawa (2008)
  165. Morris F.C., Dexter C., Kostoulias X., Uddin M.I., Peleg A.Y.: The mechanisms of disease caused by Acinetobacter baumannii. Front. Microbiol. 10, 1601 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  166. Murray P.R., Rosenthal K.S., Pfaller M.A.: Pseudomonas i bakterie podobne (w) Mikrobiologia, red. Przondo-Mordarska A., Martirosian G., Szkaradkiewicz A., Edra Urban & Partner, Wrocław, 325–332 (2016)
  167. Mussi M.A., Gaddy J.A., Cabruja M., Viale A.M., Rasia R., Actis L.A.: Motility, virulence and biofilm formation by the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii are affected by blue light. J. Bacteriol. 192, 6336–6345 (2010)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  168. Nairn B.L., Lonergan Z.R., Wang J., Braymer J.J., Zhang Y., Calcutt M.W., Lisher J.P., Gilston B.A., Chazin W.J., de Crecy-Lagard V., Giedroc D.P.: The response of Acinetobacter baumannii to zinc starvation. Cell Host Microbe, 19, 826–836 (2016)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  169. Namysłowska A., Laudy A.E., Tyski S.: Mechanizmy oporności Acinetobacter baumannii na związki przeciwbakteryjne. Post. Mikrobiol. 54, 392–406 (2015)
  170. Nemec A., Krizova L., Maixnerova M., Sedo O., Brisse S., Higgins P.G.: Acinetobacter seifertii sp. nov., a member of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolated from human clinical specimens. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Micr. 65, 934–942 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  171. Nwugo C.C., Arivett B.A., Zimbler D.L., Gaddy J.A., Richards A.M., Actis L.A.: Effect of ethanol on differential protein production and expression of potential virulence functions in the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. PloS One, 7, 12 (2012)
    [CROSSREF]
  172. O’Neill J.: Antimicrobial Resistance: Tackling a crisis for the health and wealth of nations. The review on antimicrobial resistance (2014)
  173. Papathanakos G., Andrianopoulos I., Papathanasiou A., Priavali E., Koulenti D., Koulouras V.: Colistin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia: a serious threat for critically ill patients. Microorganisms, 8, 287 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  174. Pelag A.Y., Seifert H., Petwrson D.L.: Acinetobacter baumannii: emergence of a successful pathogen. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 21, 538–582 (2008)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  175. Penwell W.F., DeGrace N., Tentarelli S., Gauthier L., Gilbert C.M., Arivett B.A., Miller A.A., Durand-Reville T., Jourbran C. Actis L.A.: Discovery and characterization of new hydroxamate siderophores, baumannoferrin A and B, produced by Acinetobacter baumannii. Chem. Biochem. 16, 1896–1904 (2015)
  176. Pires S., Peignier A., Seto J., Smyth D.S., Parker D.: Biological sex influences susceptibilillity to Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia in mice. JCI Insight. 5, e132223 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  177. Rafei R., Osman M., Dabboussi F., Hamze M.: Update on the epidemiological typing methods for Acinetobacter baumannii. Future Microbiol. 14, 1065–1080 (2019)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  178. Repizo G.D., Gagne S., Foucault-Grunenwald M.L., Borges V., Charpentier X., Limansky A.S., Salcedo S.P.: Differential role of the T6SS in Acinetobacter baumannii virulence. PLoS One, 10, 9 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  179. Reza A., Sutton J.M., Rahman K.M.: Effectiveness of efflux pump inhibitors as biofilm disruptors and resistance breakers in Gram-negative (ESKAPEE) bacteria. Antibiotics, 8, 4 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  180. Rice L.B.: Federal funding for the study of antimicrobial resistance in nosocomial pathogens: no ESKAPE. J. Infect. Dis. 197, 1079–1081 (2008)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  181. Roca Subirà I., Espinal P., Vila-Farrés X., Vila Estapé J.: The Acinetobacter baumannii oxymoron: commensal hospital dweller turned pan-drug-resistant menace. Front. Microbiol. 3, 148 (2012)
    [PUBMED]
  182. Santaniello A., Sansone M., Fioretti A., Menna L.F.: Systematic review and meta-analysis of the occurrence of ESKAPE bacteria group in dogs, and the related zoonotic risk in animal-assisted therapy, and in animal-assisted activity in the health context. Int. J. Env. Res. Public Health, 17, 3278 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  183. Schweppe D.K., Harding C., Chavez J.D., Wu X., Ramage E., Singh P.K., Manoil C., Bruce J.E.: Host-microbe protein interactions during bacterial infection. Chem. Biol. 22, 1521–1530 (2015)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  184. Šiširak M., Hukić M.: Acinetobacter baumannii as a cause of sepsis. MedGlas, 9, 311–316 (2012)
  185. Słoczyńska A., Wand M.E., Tyski S., Laudy A.E.: Analysis of blaCHDL Genes and Insertion Sequences Related to Carbapenem Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Strains Isolated in Warsaw, Poland. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 22, 2486 (2021)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  186. Smith M.G., Des Etages S.G., Snyder M.: Microbial synergy via anethanol-triggered pathway. Mol. Cell Biol. 24, 3874–3884 (2004)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  187. Spellberg B., Rex J.H.: The value of single-pathogen antibacterial agents. Nat. Rev. Drug Discov. 12, 963 (2013)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  188. Stahl J., Bergmann H., Gottig S., Ebersberger I., Averhoff B.: Acinetobacter baumannii virulence is mediated by the concerted action of three phospholipases D. PloS One, 10, 9 (2015)
  189. Szczypta A., Talaga-Ćwiertnia K., Kielar M., Krzyściak P., Gajewska A., Szura M., Bulanda M., Chmielarczyk A.: Investigation of Acinetobacter baumannii Activity in Vascular Surgery Units through Epidemiological Management Based on the Analysis of Antimicrobial Resistance, Biofilm Formation and Genotyping. Int. J. Env. Res. Pub. He. 18, 1563 (2021)
    [CROSSREF]
  190. Szewczyk E.M.: Zakażenia związane z opieką zdrowotną. (oraz) Sobiś-Glinkowska M., Różalska M.: Tlenowe pałeczki gram-ujemne (w) Diagnostyka bakteriologiczna, red. Szewczyk E.M., PWN, Warszawa (2019)
  191. Tacconelli E., Carrara E., Savoldi A., Harbarth S., Mendelson M., Monnet D.L., Zorzet A.: Discovery, research, and development of new antibiotics: the WHO priority list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and tuberculosis. Lancet Infect. Dis., 18, 318–327 (2018)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  192. Touchon M., Cury J., Yoon E.J., Krizova L., Cerqueira G.C., Murphy C., Feldgarden M., Wortman J., Clermont D., Lambert T., Grillot-Courvalin C., Nemec A., Courvalin P., Rocha E.P.C.: The genomic diversification of the whole Acinetobacter genus: origins, mechanisms, and consequences. Genome Biol. Evol. 6, 2866–2882 (2014)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  193. Traglia G.M., Place K., Dotto C., Fernandez J.S., Montaña S., dos Santos Bahiense C., Bonomo R.A.: Interspecies DNA acquisition by a naturally competent Acinetobacter baumannii strain. Int. J. Antimicrob. Ag. 53, 483–490 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  194. Van der Kolk J.H., Endimiani A., Graubner C., Gerber V., Perreten V.: Acinetobacter in veterinary medicine, with an emphasis on Acinetobacter baumannii. J. Glob. Antimicrob. Re, 16, 59–71 (2019)
    [CROSSREF]
  195. Veening J.W., Blokesch M.: Interbacterial predation as a strategy for DNA acquisition in naturally competent bacteria. Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 15, 621 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  196. Vincent J., Rello J., Marshall J., Silva E., Anzueto A., Martin C.D., Reinhart K.: International study of the prevalence and outcomes of infection in intensive care units. JAMA.; 302, 2323–2329 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  197. Wałaszek M., Różańska A., Bulanda M., Wójkowska-Mach J.: Alarmujące wyniki występowania szpitalnych zakażeń krwi w wieloośrodkowym programie nadzoru nad zakażeniami szpitalnymi w polskich oddziałach intensywnej terapii medycznej. Przegląd Epidemiol. 72, 33–44 (2018)
  198. Weber B.S., Kinsella R.L., Harding C.M., Feldman M.F.: The secrets of Acinetobacter secretion. Trends Microbiol. 25, 532–545 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  199. Weber B.S., Ly P.M., Irwin J.N., Pukatzki S., Feldman M.F.: A multidrug resistance plasmid contains the molecular switch for type VI secretion in Acinetobacter baumannii. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 112, 9442–9447 (2015)
    [CROSSREF]
  200. Wilharm G., Skiebe E., Higgins P.G., Poppel M.T., Blaschke U., Leser S., Jerzak L.: Relatedness of wildlife and livestock avian isolates of the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii to lineages spread in hospitals worldwide. Env. Microbiol. 19, 4349–4364 (2017)
    [CROSSREF]
  201. Wilks M., Wilson A., Warwisk S., Price E., Kennedz D., Elz A., Millar M.R.: Control of an Outbreak of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticuscolonization and infection in an intensive care unit (ICU) without closing the ICU or placing patients in isolation. Infect. Cont. Hosp. Ep. 27, 654–658 (2006)
    [CROSSREF]
  202. Wong D., Nielsen T.B., Bonomo R.A., Pantapalangkoor P., Luna B., Spellberg B.: Clinical and pathophysiological overview of Acinetobacter infections: a century of challenges. American Society for Microbiology. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 30, 409–447 (2017)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]
  203. Xu A., Zhu H., Gao B., Weng H., Ding Z., Li M., He G.: Diagnosis of severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Acinetobacter baumannii through next-generation sequencing: a case report. BMC Infect. Dis. 20, 1–7 (2020)
    [CROSSREF]
  204. Zimbler D.L., Penwell W.F., Gaddy J.A., Menke S.M., Tomaras A.P., Connerly P.L., Actis L.A.: Iron acquisition functions expressed by the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. Biometals, 22, 23–32 (2009)
    [PUBMED] [CROSSREF]

EXTRA FILES

COMMENTS