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Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine

Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine

Subject: Medicine

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ISSN: 1449-3764
eISSN: 2639-6416

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FEATURED ARTICLES

CHALLENGES WITH RECERTIFICATION (OF EAGLE’S SYNDROME) – WHO HAS THE TIME?
CRYPTOGENIC STROKE IN AN AIRLINE TRANSPORT PILOT

VOLUME 10 (2015) - List of articles

CHALLENGES WITH AEROMEDICAL CERTIFICATION AFTER A ‘FUNNY TURN’

Priti Bhatt

Temporary loss of consciousness is unnerving for anyone, however the consequences in some professions can be devastating. This paper discusses the case of an Airline Transport Pilot License pilot who experienced a ‘funny turn’ resulting in loss of consciousness, with reference to the aeromedical decision-making process and a literature review.

DOI: 10.21307/asam-2015-001

Published Online: 27-June-2018

COLOUR VISION TESTING: SCIENCE OR JUST BAD HABITS?

David Collis

Colour vision testing has been and remains a controversial subject in aviation. Despite this, colour testing methods have remained essentially unchanged in many years. This presentation reviews the relevance of colour testing methodologies to modern aviation and presents a review of recent literature relating to colour vision and how it is affected by various physiological states and changes occurring with various pathological conditions; and the relevance of these discoveries to current and fut(..)

DOI: 10.21307/asam-2015-002

Published Online: 27-June-2018

CHALLENGES WITH RECERTIFICATION (OF EAGLE’S SYNDROME) – WHO HAS THE TIME?

Ian Cheng

A 50 year old male airline transport pilot licence (ATPL) pilot had been on a CASA audit requirement (CAR) for Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma since 2010. As part of his ongoing haematological medical surveillance a neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis CT scan in 2014 reported an “incidental” abnormality in his neck. Perusal of the first several articles raised from a “Google” search of the abnormality linked it with possible stroke, carotid dissection and death. Would CASA now cancel or suspend this pilot’s (..)

DOI: 10.21307/asam-2015-003

Published Online: 27-June-2018

CRYPTOGENIC STROKE IN AN AIRLINE TRANSPORT PILOT

Simon May

This case presentation discusses an airline captain who suffered a cerebrovascular event. Despite extensive investigation, no underlying cause or contributing factors could be identified. He went on to make a full recovery from his stroke, and after two years applied for renewal of his medical certificate. This presentation discusses the aeromedical certification process, including the restrictions and health surveillance measures put in place once he was recertified.

DOI: 10.21307/asam-2015-004

Published Online: 27-June-2018

SUDDEN VISUAL DISTURBANCE IN AN AIRCREWMAN – INVESTIGATION AND DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

Wolfgang Seckler

This case report is about an Australian Army aircrewman who developed a sudden incapacitating visual disturbance. The case study explores the investigation pathway, differential diagnoses and the aeromedical implications. Although not all cases of visual disturbance have an underlying ophthalmological or neurological cause, and in fact might be quite benign, there is a possibility of a serious pathology of vascular or ischaemic aetiology affecting fitness to fly and recertification. History, sig(..)

DOI: 10.21307/asam-2015-005

Published Online: 27-June-2018

A CASE OF CEREBRAL ANEURYSM IN FAST JET AIRCREW

Collette Richards

An asymptomatic 33 year old male Air Combat Officer was recommended to have a CT cerebral angiogram, based on a family history of a vascular anomaly. A 1-2mm aneurysm located in the cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery was discovered. Neurosurgical advice was obtained which indicated that the risk of haemorrhage from this aneurysm in this location is ‘practically zero’, and that there is no indication for any intervention. The fast jet environment does impose significant stress on th(..)

DOI: 10.21307/asam-2015-006

Published Online: 27-June-2018

SUBARACHNOID HAEMORRHAGE AND INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM IN A MILITARY AVIATOR: FACTORS DETERMINING AEROMEDICAL DISPOSITION

AM Gordon Cable

A Royal Australian Navy aviator was diagnosed with a subarachnoid haemorrhage after sudden onset of occipital headache, the result of a small aneurysm of the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The aneurysm was surgically wrapped and clipped through a posterior fossa craniotomy, and the patient made a full and uncomplicated recovery. Except in rare cases, subarachnoid haemorrahge and intracranial aneurysms are generally considered to be disqualifying for military aviation. Even with good (..)

DOI: 10.21307/asam-2015-007

Published Online: 27-June-2018

GUIDELINES FOR TRAVELLING WITH PASSENGERS WITH A DISABILITY

Caron Jander/ Lisa Anne Martin

DOI: 10.21307/asam-2015-008

Published Online: 27-June-2018

ESSENTIAL TRAVEL MEDICINE. ZUCKERMAN J, BRUNETTE G, LEGGAT P

Ian Cheng

DOI: 10.21307/asam-2015-009

Published Online: 27-June-2018

THE FIELD GUIDE TO UNDERSTANDING HUMAN ERROR. 3RD ED. SIDNEY DEKKER.

Adrian Smith

DOI: 10.21307/asam-2015-010

Published Online: 27-June-2018

HIGH G FLIGHT: PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND COUNTER-MEASURES. DAVID G NEWMAN.

Adrian Smith

DOI: 10.21307/asam-2015-011

Published Online: 27-June-2018

PATIENT SAFETY CULTURE: THEORY, METHODS, AND APPLICATION. PATRICK WATERSON (ED).

Adrian Smith

DOI: 10.21307/asam-2015-012

Published Online: 27-June-2018

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