Applications of selected cells in immunohematology in a developing country: case studies

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 33 , ISSUE 1 (March 2017) > List of articles

Applications of selected cells in immunohematology in a developing country: case studies

Ravi C. Dara Dara / Aseem Kumar Tiwari * / Dinesh Arora / Subhasis Mitra / Geet Aggarwal / Devi Prasad Acharya / Gunjan Bhardwaj

Keywords : selected cells, immunohematology, unexpected antibody, alloimmunization  

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 33, Issue 1, Pages 27-35, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-006

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 09-October-2019

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ABSTRACT

When an antibody is detected, its specificity should be determined and its likely clinical significance should be assessed. When one antibody has been identified, it becomes necessary to confirm the presence of additional significant antibodies to ensure that compatible blood is provided to the patient. To perform this confirmation, specific reagent red blood cells (RBCs) are selected; these are called selected cells. Though the most common use of selected cells is for antibody confirmation, they can also be used for several other immunohematologic applications. In a developing country like India, the performance of antibody screening for unexpected antibodies on a routine basis is a comparatively new phenomenon, and those laboratories performing advanced immunohematologic testing would need to use selected cells to arrive at an accurate conclusion. This report defines selected cells and enumerates sources of these RBCs. Detailed immunohematologic applications are discussed with applicable case studies.

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