Distribution of blood groups in the Iranian general population

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 32 , ISSUE 4 (December 2016) > List of articles

Distribution of blood groups in the Iranian general population

Ehsan Shahverdi / Mostafa Moghaddam * / Ali Talebian / Hassan Abolghasemi

Keywords : blood group systems, red blood cell antigens, phenotype prevalence, MNS, ABO, Rh, Kell, Kidd, Duffy

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 32, Issue 4, Pages 135-139, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-058

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 09-October-2019

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

We report the first study of antigen and phenotype prevalence within various blood group systems in the Iranian general population. In this retrospective study, samples from 3475 individuals referred to the Immunohematology Reference Laboratory of the Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran, Iran, for paternity testing from 1998 to 2008 were additionally tested for red blood cell (RBC) antigens in the Rh, Kell, Kidd, Duffy, MNS, Lutheran, P1PK, and Xg blood group systems. The antigen testing was performed by the tube method, and the phenotype prevalences were expressed as percentages. Of 3475 (1857 male and 1618 female) blood samples, 1268 samples were typed as group O (36.49%), 1115 as group A (32.09%), 823 as group B (23.68%), and 269 as group AB (7.74%). In our sample population, 3152 (90.71%) samples were D+ and 323 (9.29%) were D–. Analysis of Rh antigen typing results showed e (3359; 96.66%) to be most prevalent in the Iranian population, followed by D (3152; 90.71%), C (2677; 77.04%), c (2557; 73.58%), and E (1059; 30.47%). In the Kell blood group system, 3293 (94.76%) samples were typed as K–k+. For the Kidd and Duffy blood group systems, the following were the most common phenotypes: Jk(a+b+) (1703; 49%), Jk(a+b–) (1006; 28.95%), Fy(a+b+) (1495; 43.02%), and Fy(a+b–) (1005; 28.92%). In the MNS blood group system, the following were the most common phenotypes: M+N+ (1668; 48%), M+N– (1310; 37.70%), S+s+ (1564; 45%), and S–s+ (1392; 40.06%). In the Lutheran and P1PK blood group systems, Lu(a–b+) and P1+ phenotypes were observed in 3292 (94.73%) and 1966 (56.58%) samples, respectively. The Xg antigen was present in 1953 (56.20%) samples versus 1522 (43.80%) samples identified as Xg(a–). Knowledge of the prevalence of RBC antigen phenotypes in a population can be useful in databank creation for providing antigen-negative compatible blood to patients with multiple alloantibodies.

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