Acute hemolytic transfusion reaction attributed to anti-Ata

Publications

Share / Export Citation / Email / Print / Text size:

Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

GET ALERTS

ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

DESCRIPTION

4
Reader(s)
9
Visit(s)
0
Comment(s)
0
Share(s)

SEARCH WITHIN CONTENT

FIND ARTICLE

Volume / Issue / page

Related articles

VOLUME 32 , ISSUE 4 (December 2016) > List of articles

Acute hemolytic transfusion reaction attributed to anti-Ata

Jay S. Raval * / Sarah K. Harm / Bethann Wagner / Darrell J. Triulzi / Mark H. Yazer

Keywords : anti-Ata, high-prevalence antigen, hemolytic transfusion reaction

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 32, Issue 4, Pages 140-142, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-059

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 09-October-2019

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

Anti-Ata is a rare alloantibody that can be clinically significant. We report a case of a woman who, after emergency-released uncrossmatched red blood cell transfusion, experienced an acute hemolytic transfusion reaction attributed to anti-Ata. The case presented herein highlights the importance of recognizing that anti-Ata may indeed cause acute hemolytic reactions.

Content not available PDF Share

FIGURES & TABLES

REFERENCES

1. Reid ME, Lomas-Francis C, Olsson ML. The blood group antigen factsbook. 3rd ed. San Diego, CA: Academic Press, 2012:682.

2. Applewhaite F, Ginsberg V, Gerena J, Cunningham CA, Gavin J. A very frequent red cell antigen, Ata. Vox Sang 1967;13: 444–5.

3. Frank S, Schmidt RP, Baugh M. Three new antibodies to highincidence antigenic determinants (anti-El, anti-Dp, and antiSo). Transfusion 1970;10:254–7.

4. Winkler MM, Hamilton JR. Previously tested donors eliminated to determine rare phenotype frequencies. International Society of Blood Transfusion/American Association of Blood Banks 1990 Joint Congress. Arlington, VA: American Association of Blood Banks, 1990:158.

5. Gellerman MM, McCreary J, Yedinak E, Stroup M. Six additional examples of anti-Ata. Transfusion 1973;13:225–30.

6. Sweeney JD, Holme S, McCall L, Huett D, Storry J, Reid M. At(a–) phenotype: description of a family and reduced survival of At(a+) red cells in a proposita with anti-Ata. Transfusion 1995;35:63–7.

7. Ramsey G, Sherman LA, Zimmer AM, et al. Clinical significance of anti-Ata. Vox Sang 1995;69:135–7.

8. Culver PL, Brubaker DB, Sheldon RE, Martin M, Richter CA. Anti-Ata causing mild hemolytic disease of the newborn. Transfusion 1987;27:468–70.

9. Cash KL, Brown T, Sausais L, Uehlinger J, Reed LJ. Severe delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction secondary to anti-Ata. Transfusion 1999;39:834–7.

10. Burnette RE, Couter K. A positive antibody screen—an encounter with the Augustine antibody. J Natl Med Assoc 2002;94:166–70.

11. Ramsey G, Smietana SJ. Multiple or uncommon red cell alloantibodies in women: association with autoimmune disease. Transfusion 1995;35:582–6.

12. Daniels G, Ballif BA, Helias V, et al. Lack of the nucleoside transporter ENT1 results in the Augustine-null blood type and ectopic mineralization. Blood 2015;125:3651–4.

13. Storry JR, Castilho L, Chen Q, et al. International Society of Blood Transfusion Working Party on Red Cell Immunogenetics and Terminology: report of the Seoul and London meetings. ISBT Sci Ser 2016;11:118–22.

 

 

EXTRA FILES

COMMENTS