Trends of ABO and Rh phenotypes in transfusion-dependent patients in Pakistan

Publications

Share / Export Citation / Email / Print / Text size:

Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

GET ALERTS SUBSCRIBE

ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

DESCRIPTION

12
Reader(s)
28
Visit(s)
0
Comment(s)
0
Share(s)

SEARCH WITHIN CONTENT

FIND ARTICLE

Volume / Issue / page

Archive
Volume 37 (2021)
Volume 36 (2020)
Volume 35 (2019)
Volume 34 (2018)
Volume 33 (2017)
Volume 32 (2016)
Volume 31 (2015)
Volume 30 (2014)
Volume 29 (2013)
Volume 28 (2012)
Volume 27 (2011)
Volume 26 (2010)
Volume 25 (2009)
Volume 24 (2008)
Volume 23 (2007)
Volume 22 (2006)
Volume 21 (2005)
Volume 20 (2004)
Volume 19 (2003)
Volume 18 (2002)
Volume 17 (2001)
Volume 16 (2000)
Volume 15 (1999)
Volume 14 (1998)
Volume 13 (1997)
Volume 12 (1996)
Volume 11 (1995)
Volume 10 (1994)
Volume 9 (1993)
Volume 8 (1992)
Volume 7 (1991)
Volume 6 (1990)
Volume 5 (1989)
Volume 4 (1988)
Volume 3 (1987)
Related articles

VOLUME 32 , ISSUE 4 (December 2016) > List of articles

Trends of ABO and Rh phenotypes in transfusion-dependent patients in Pakistan

Nida Anwar / Munira Borhany * / Saqib Ansari / Sana Khurram / Uzma Zaidi / Imran Naseer / Muhammad Nadeem / Tahir Shamsi

Keywords : ABO, Rh phenotype, alloimmunization

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 32, Issue 4, Pages 170-173, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-062

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 09-October-2019

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of ABO and Rh phenotypes in the general Pakistan population. This information could be used to help reduce the rate of alloimmunization in patients with blood disorders, such as thalassemia major, who require frequent blood transfusions. A total of 242 patients with blood disorders requiring frequent blood transfusions were enrolled in the study. ABO and Rh typing was performed on samples from these patients using tube and gel methods. Of these 242 patients, 146 (60.4%) were male and 96 (39.6%) were female. The prevalence of ABO and D phenotypes was as follows: group O, D+ (38.8%), group O, D– (2.5%), group B, D+ (32.2%), group A, D+ (17.4%), group A, D– (1.7%), and group AB, D+ (7.4%). Of the 242 patients, 232 (95.8%) were D+ and 10 (4.2%) were D–. The most prevalent Rh antigen was found to be e (97%), followed by D (95%), C (89.6%), c (62.8%), and lastly, E (22.6%). The prevalence of Rh phenotypes was: R1R1 (37.7%), R1r (33.4%), R1R2 (19.4%), R2r (5.2%), and rr (4.3 %). All of the D– patients were rr. In our study, the highest prevalence of ABO phenotypes was group O and the most prevalent Rh antigen was e. Rh phenotyping, along with antibody screening and identification should be performed prior to transfusion of patients requiring multiple transfusions to reduce and possibly prevent the rate of alloimmunization.

You don't have 'Full Text' access of this article.

Purchase Article Subscribe Journal Share