A novel JK null allele associated with typing discrepancies among African Americans

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 29 , ISSUE 4 (December 2013) > List of articles

A novel JK null allele associated with typing discrepancies among African Americans

Katrina L. Billingsley / Jeff B. Posadas / Joann M. Moulds / Lakshmi K. Gaur

Keywords : blood group, null allele, Jk antigens, Jk:–3

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 29, Issue 4, Pages 145-148, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-138

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 01-December-2019

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

The Jknull (Jk-3) phenotype, attributable to null or silenced alleles, has predominantly been found in persons of Polynesian descent. With the increased use of molecular genotyping, many new silencing mutations have been identified in persons of other ethnic backgrounds. To date, only two JK null alleles have been reported in African Americans, JK*01N.04 and JK*01N.05. A comparative study was undertaken to determine whether JK mutations were present in the regional African American population. Results of donor genotyping were compared with previously recorded results of serologic tests, and discrepant results were investigated. Although the two previously identified polymorphisms were not detected in the discrepant samples, a novel allele (191G>A) was identified and was assigned the ISBT number JK*02N.09. This study illustrates a limitation of using single-nucleotide polymorphisms for prediction of blood group antigens.

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