Prevalence of RHD*DOL and RHCE*ce(818T)  in two populations

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 27 , ISSUE 2 (June 2011) > List of articles

Prevalence of RHD*DOL and RHCE*ce(818T)  in two populations

Christine Halter Hipsky / Daiane Cobianchi da Costa / Ricardo Omoto / Angela Zanette / Lilian Castilho / Marion E. Reid

Keywords : blood groups, Rh alleles, low-prevalence antigens, population study

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 27, Issue 2, Pages 66-67, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-176

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 01-December-2019

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ABSTRACT

The alleles RHCE*ceBI (RHCE*ce 48C, 712G, 818T, 1132G) and RHCE*ceSM (RHCE*ce 48C, 712G, 818T) encode the lowprevalence Rh antigen STEM. These alleles frequently travel in cis with RHD*DOL. To estimate the frequency of these alleles, we tested a total of more than 700 samples in two populations. Blood samples were obtained from patients with sickle cell disease and from blood donors of African descent. DNA extractions and analyses were performed by standard methods. In the United States, none of 70 patient samples had the RHCE*818 nucleotide change. Two of 220 donors (frequency of 0.009) were heterozygous for RHCE*818C/T (RHCE*ceBI). One of these samples had RHD/RHD*DOL and the other had RHD/RHD*DOL-2. In these 290 samples, no other RHD*DOL alleles were found. In Brazil, 1 of 244 patients with sickle cell disease (frequency of 0.004) and 1 of 171 donors (frequency of 0.006) were heterozygous for RHCE*818C/T (RHCE*ceBI). Testing of more than 500 additional samples from people of African descent, selected because they had a diverse range of common and variant RHCE alleles, did not reveal a sample with RHD*DOL or RHD/RHD*DOL-2 in the absence of RHCE*ce(818T). Although the numbers are small, our study shows that in the United States, the frequency of RHCE*818T is 0.007 (2 in 290 samples) and in Brazil it is 0.004 (2 in 515 samples). The four RHCE*818T alleles were RHCE*ceBI.

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