The incidence of red cell alloantibodies underlying panreactive warm autoantibodies

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 21 , ISSUE 3 (September 2005) > List of articles

The incidence of red cell alloantibodies underlying panreactive warm autoantibodies

Martin Maley / David G. Bruce / Roderick G. Babb / Angus W. Wells / Mark Williams

Keywords : autoantibody, alloantibody, alloadsorption, autoadsorption

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 21, Issue 3, Pages 122-125, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-404

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 28-April-2020

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

A recognized hazard of administering blood transfusions to patients with panreactive warm autoantibodies is that alloantibodies may be masked. Studies have shown the incidence of underlying alloantibodies to be 30 to 40 percent. Adsorption procedures can be used to remove autoantibodies and allow detection and identification of underlying alloantibodies. This study contains data from 126 patients referred to the Red Cell Immunohaematology laboratory at the National Blood Service, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. These patients were from the northeast of England, a population for which data have not previously been reported. Samples identified as containing panreactive warm autoantibodies were subjected to adsorption procedures (95 by alloadsorption and 31 by autoadsorption). Absorbed sera were then tested to identify underlying alloantibodies. Of 126 samples, 39 (31%) contained a total of 61 RBC alloantibodies; 15 (12%) contained 2 or more antibody specificities;and 14 (11%) contained alloantibodies not found within the Rh or Kell blood group systems. Antibodies identified included the following specificities:E (19),D (9),c (7),C (6),S (5),Fya (3),Jka (2),Jkb (2),K (2),Kpa (2),Fyb,Cw,N, and f (ce). This study reinforces the value of adsorption studies, whether using autologous or allogeneic RBCs, when panreactive warm autoantibodies are present. In addition, this study confirms that it is not appropriate in these cases simply to issue blood which is “least incompatible” or Rh phenotype- and K antigen-matched.

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