Variations in pretransfusion practices

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 19 , ISSUE 1 (March 2003) > List of articles

Variations in pretransfusion practices

Beverly J. Padget / Judith L. Hannon

Keywords : pretransfusion testing, blood typing, antibody screening, compatibility tests

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 19, Issue 1, Pages 1-6, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-465

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 14-October-2020

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

A variety of pretransfusion tests have been developed to improve the safety and effectiveness of transfusion. Recently, a number of traditional tests have been shown to offer limited clinical benefit and have been eliminated in many facilities. A survey of pretransfusion test practices was distributed to 116 hospital transfusion services. Routine test practices and facility size were analyzed. Ninety-one responses were received. Many smaller laboratories include tests such as anti-A,B, an autocontrol, and DAT, and immediate spin and 37°C microscopic readings. Nine percent never perform an Rh control with anti-D typing on patient samples. Various antibody screening and crossmatch methods are utilized. Individual laboratory test practices should be periodically assessed to ensure that they comply with standards, represent the recognized best practice, and are cost-effective. The survey responses indicate that many laboratories perform tests that are not necessary or cost-effective. These facilities should review their processes to determine which tests contribute to transfusion safety. Smaller facilities may be reluctant to change or lack the expertise necessary for this decision making and often continue to perform tests that have been eliminated in larger facilities. Consultation with larger hospital transfusion services may provide guidance for this change.

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