Use of LOR-15C9 monoclonal anti-D to differentiate erythrocytes with the partial DVI antigen from those with other partial D antigens or weak D antigens

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 14 , ISSUE 3 (September 1998) > List of articles

Use of LOR-15C9 monoclonal anti-D to differentiate erythrocytes with the partial DVI antigen from those with other partial D antigens or weak D antigens

Marion E. Reid / Gregory R. Halverson / Francis Roubinet / P.A. Apoil / Antoine Blancher

Keywords : D antigen, D variants, immunoblotting, monoclonal anti-D, partial D variants, Rh blood group system

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 14, Issue 3, Pages 89-93, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-670

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Published Online: 03-November-2020

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ABSTRACT

Historically, red blood cells (RBCs) with partial D antigens have been defined serologically by their pattern of reactivity with polyclonal and monoclonal anti-D. Although numerous variants have been described in tests with well-characterized monoclonal anti-D, definition remains difficult to ascertain serologically. RBCs of known partial D type were tested with LOR-15C9 (a monoclonal anti-D) and commercial anti-D by the tube indirect antiglobulin test (IAT), by micro typing system IgG gel cards, and by immunoblotting. By IAT, LOR-15C9 reacted strongly with DIIIa, DIIIc, DVa, DVI, DVII, and DFR RBCs in addition to RBCs with common D antigens; weakly with DII, DNU, and DIIIb RBCs; and not at all with DIVa, DIVb, DBT, or R0Har RBCs. Reactivity was variable (1+ to 4+), with RBCs classified as weak D (Du). As expected, the commercial anti-D agglutinated all D variants and weak D RBC samples by the IAT and by using IgG gel cards; however, the reactivity with DVI RBCs was weaker than with LOR- 15C9. By immunoblotting, LOR-15C9 detected a band with an apparent molecular mass of approximate Mr 30,000–34,000 in membranes prepared from D-positive, DIIIa, DIIIc, DVa, DVI, DVII, and DFR RBCs and an additional band of Mr 20,000-22,000 in membranes prepared from DVI RBCs. No band(s) was detected in membranes from DII, DNU, DIIIb, DIVa, DIVb, DBT, R0Har, weak D, or D-negative samples. LOR-15C9 provides a useful tool to identify positively DVI samples and thereby differentiate this partial D from other D variants and from weak D samples.

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