A comprehensive IgA service provided by a blood transfusion center

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 14 , ISSUE 4 (December 1998) > List of articles

A comprehensive IgA service provided by a blood transfusion center

R. Munks / J.R. Booth / R.J. Sokol

Keywords : IgA, anti-IgA, IgA deficiency

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 14, Issue 4, Pages 155-160, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-686

License : (Transfer of Copyright)

Published Online: 03-November-2020

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

IgA is best known in transfusion practice for its deficiency when antiIgA antibodies cause severe anaphylactic reactions. Following the realization that IgA deficient products were needed on demand, blood donors were routinely screened, initially by latex agglutination inhibition and subsequently by hemagglutination inhibition using an Olympus PK-7200™ blood grouping machine. IgA deficiency (<.0016 g/L) was found in 357 (with anti-IgA in 28%) of 301,310 donors, an incidence of 1 in 844. By screening new donors and directed call-up, group O, D– red blood cell (RBC) units are always in stock. During 1 year, the center supplied 79 units of RBCs and 64 units of fresh frozen plasma to a variety of patients with IgA deficiency, including three undergoing liver transplantation. The center also provides a reference service for IgA/anti-IgA status. The technique used (hemagglutination inhibition) has a sensitivity well below the threshold of standard quantitation methods. Samples were most commonly referred from departments investigating possible immunodeficiency and suspected transfusion reactions. Of 247 patients investigated, 122 had IgA deficiency, 43 with anti-IgA (of whom 5 had suffered a transfusion reaction). Donors and patients with antiIgA were issued blood group cards warning that they should only receive IgA deficient products.

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