ABO genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism

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Immunohematology

American National Red Cross

Subject: Medical Laboratory Technology

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ISSN: 0894-203X
eISSN: 1930-3955

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VOLUME 12 , ISSUE 4 (December 1996) > List of articles

ABO genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism

Nicole A. Mifsud / Albert P. Haddad / Jennifer A. Condon / Rosemary L. Sparrow

Citation Information : Immunohematology. Volume 12, Issue 4, Pages 143-148, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/immunohematology-2019-768

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Published Online: 16-November-2020

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ABSTRACT

Genotyping enables the identification of both maternally and paternally derived alleles. A number of protocols have been described for the genotyping of the ABO blood group system. Generally, these methods have a number of disadvantages including the use of hazardous reagents, being technically demanding, and the excessive use of materials. In this study, a relatively simple polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method is described. Four different amplifications were used that were specific for nucleotides sites 261, 526, 703, and 796 to distinguish the A, B, O1 and O2 alleles. The ABO genotypes of 294 random individuals were determined and were found to completely correlate with the serologic phenotypes. The protocol is applicable for investigations of weak or nonexpression of ABO alleles, paternity determinations, and population analysis.

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