PATIENT SAFETY CULTURE: THEORY, METHODS, AND APPLICATION. PATRICK WATERSON (ED).

Publications

Share / Export Citation / Email / Print / Text size:

Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine

Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine

Subject: Medicine

GET ALERTS

ISSN: 1449-3764
eISSN: 2639-6416

DESCRIPTION

21
Reader(s)
48
Visit(s)
0
Comment(s)
0
Share(s)

SEARCH WITHIN CONTENT

FIND ARTICLE

Volume / Issue / page

Related articles

PATIENT SAFETY CULTURE: THEORY, METHODS, AND APPLICATION. PATRICK WATERSON (ED).

Adrian Smith

Citation Information : Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine. Volume 10, Pages 28-28, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/asam-2015-012

License : (CC-BY-4.0)

Published Online: 27-June-2018

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

Patient safety culture: theory, methods, and application, edited by Patrick Waterson, provides a solid foundational understanding of the principles of clinical safety systems that can be established in hospitals and healthcare facilities. Much of the book leverages from the experiences gained pioneering work undertaken in the aviation and air traffic management systems over the years.

Aeromedical examiners and specialists in aerospace medicine are in the fortunate position of understanding the operational environments of both industries – aviation and healthcare. This text provides valuable understanding of how the safety systems used widely in the aviation industry can be implemented within a healthcare setting, working to improve the safety culture within a healthcare setting to ensure optimal patient outcomes.

Patient safety culture: theory, methods, and application is divided into four sections. Part 1 describes the background of organizational safety culture, and discusses the theories and practices of different industries. People familiar with aviation safety systems will recognize the concepts discussed in this section. Part 2 describes tools that can be used to assess and explore organizational safety cultures, and practical safety indicators that can help monitor advances in safety management. Part 3 provides practical advice on how to implement changes to improve safety outcomes for large organisations. Part 4 describes the safety management and safety culture in an air traffic management system, and directly compares this to the need to enhance patient safety culture in healthcare settings.

Aeromedical examiners and specialists in aerospace medicine often combine their experience in aviation medicine with other dimensions of clinical practice – including primary health care as well as hospital settings. By applying their experience and knowledge of safety management in aviation to other dimensions of clinical practice, aeromedical examiners and specialists in aerospace medicine can provide valuable assistance to improving patient safety culture. Patient safety culture: theory, methods, and application will provide the much-needed framework and tools to help transfer the safety lessons from aviation to other healthcare settings.

I would heartily recommend this book for ASAM members who are interested in promoting patient safety through enhancing the patient safety culture of the organisations they work in.

XML PDF Share

FIGURES & TABLES

REFERENCES

EXTRA FILES

COMMENTS