Assessment within ILP: A journey of collaborative inquiry

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Journal of Educational Leadership, Policy and Practice

New Zealand Educational Administration and Leadership Society

Subject: Education

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ISSN: 1178-8690

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VOLUME 32 , ISSUE 1 (June 2017) > List of articles

Assessment within ILP: A journey of collaborative inquiry

Linda Harvie / Steve Harper-Travers / Amanda Jaeger

Keywords : Collaborative inquiry; assessment and reporting; innovative learning pedagogies; distributive leadership; developmental action-research

Citation Information : Journal of Educational Leadership, Policy and Practice. Volume 32, Issue 1, Pages 133-139, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/jelpp-2017-012

License : (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

Published Online: 21-April-2019

ARTICLE

ABSTRACT

Innovative Learning Pedagogies (ILPs) have given rise to much focus on the pedagogical changes required
to ensure students work collaboratively, apply knowledge, create outcomes and communicate these outcomes
effectively. One key element that has had much less focus is how students are assessed when working in an
Innovative Learning Environment (ILE) and how this assessment information might be communicated to all
stakeholders. As a school, we commenced our collaborative inquiry using action research-based Professional
Learning to enable us to assess and track students who might not be in our assigned class and reflect upon
whether traditional written reports to parents fitted the new pedagogies.
Key findings from collaboration with teachers, students and parents demonstrated the desire for a system
of assessment that was online and allowed:
• Higher levels of student voice and agency
• On-going review so that the most current information about achievement and goals was available
• Parents to share in the richness of their child’s learning journey
• A holistic profile of the students, rather than one which purely focussed on academic achievements.
We believe that the outcomes of this assessment inquiry will have a significant impact on all teaching and
learning in our ILEs.

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REFERENCES

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