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Research Article

FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS – A DECEITFUL PATHOGEN

Francisella tularensis is an intracellular bacterial pathogen which causes a potentially lethal disease named tularemia. Some studies have been conducted to describe and identify the virulence factors of F. tularensis. This pathogen is able to infect a variety of cells of various hosts, including wild animals, especially rabbits, hares and rodents, and humans. This may suggest that genes of F. tularensis must adapt to many different intraorganismal environments. Still, little is known about the

Kamila Formińska, Aleksandra Anna Zasada

Postępy Mikrobiologii - Advancements of Microbiology , ISSUE 2, 187–195

Short Communication

Development and Evaluation of a Latex Agglutination Test for the Identification of Francisella tularensis Subspecies Pathogenic for Human

Francisella tularensis are highly infectious bacteria causing a zoonotic disease called tularemia. Identification of this bacterium is based on antigen detection or PCR. The paper presents a latex agglutination test (LAT) for rapid identification of clinically relevant F. tularensis subspecies. The test can be performed within three minutes with live or inactivated bacteria. The possibility to test the inactivated samples reduces the risk of laboratory acquired infection and allows performing

WALDEMAR RASTAWICKI, KAMILA FORMIŃSKA, ALEKSANDRA A. ZASADA

Polish Journal of Microbiology , ISSUE 2, 241–244

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