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research-article | 29-January-2021

CHALLENGES OF COVID-19 AEROMEDICAL RETRIEVAL: LESSONS LEARNT FROM CONDUCTING AEROMEDICAL TRANSFERS DURING A PANDEMIC

BACKGROUND The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the challenges inherent in the transfer of patients with highly contagious pathogens. The inherent risks in this setting include: inability to maintain appropriate physical distancing1, prolonged patient exposure time2 the requirement to perform aerosol-generating procedures3. the potential risk of high viral load within the enclosed aircraft cabin. inability to extricate from the environment Aeromedical organisations must ensure both staff

Gihan Ganesh, Gayle Christie, David McIlroy, Shelley Dutton, Andrew Challen

Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine, Volume 12 , 8–12

Conference Presentation | 27-June-2018

CHALLENGES WITH AEROMEDICAL CERTIFICATION AFTER A ‘FUNNY TURN’

Temporary loss of consciousness is unnerving for anyone, however the consequences in some professions can be devastating. This paper discusses the case of an Airline Transport Pilot License pilot who experienced a ‘funny turn’ resulting in loss of consciousness, with reference to the aeromedical decision-making process and a literature review.

Priti Bhatt

Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine, Volume 10 , 4–5

Case Study | 27-June-2018

SUBARACHNOID HAEMORRHAGE AND INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM IN A MILITARY AVIATOR: FACTORS DETERMINING AEROMEDICAL DISPOSITION

recovery of neurological functioning, complications such as seizures, risk of rebleeding, and de novo occurrence of other aneurysms are all significant concerns due to the risk of sudden incapacitation. This paper will examine the aeromedical factors particular to this case that influenced a favorable aeromedical decision-making outcome.

AM Gordon Cable

Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine, Volume 10 , 19–21

research-article | 30-January-2020

DANGERS OF DEFIBRILLATION IN FLIGHT

outside of hospital.4 The rate of cardiac arrest during aeromedical transport is between 3.4-5% with a requirement for defibrillation occurring in 0.8% of all missions.5 Defibrillation can cause significant harm to both patient and health practitioners unless appropriate measures are undertaken to reduce the risk. When defibrillation is attempted during an aeromedical transport the risk increases. The dangers of defibrillation can be divided into four main categories: fire, electrical, avionic

Adam Beebeejaun, Howard Roby

Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine, Volume 11 , 1–4

Conference Presentation | 27-June-2018

SUDDEN VISUAL DISTURBANCE IN AN AIRCREWMAN – INVESTIGATION AND DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

This case report is about an Australian Army aircrewman who developed a sudden incapacitating visual disturbance. The case study explores the investigation pathway, differential diagnoses and the aeromedical implications. Although not all cases of visual disturbance have an underlying ophthalmological or neurological cause, and in fact might be quite benign, there is a possibility of a serious pathology of vascular or ischaemic aetiology affecting fitness to fly and recertification. History

Wolfgang Seckler

Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine, Volume 10 , 13–15

Conference Presentation | 27-June-2018

A CASE OF CEREBRAL ANEURYSM IN FAST JET AIRCREW

the individual however, and aeromedical decision making is often more difficult when, despite the depth of evidence available, the risks remain unquantifiable. This paper discusses the literature review conducted, the risk factors for rupture and risks of rupture, precipitating events, treatment, monitoring, and advice for the affected individual. The aeromedical disposition of the affected individual is outlined.

Collette Richards

Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine, Volume 10 , 16–18

Conference Presentation | 27-June-2018

CRYPTOGENIC STROKE IN AN AIRLINE TRANSPORT PILOT

This case presentation discusses an airline captain who suffered a cerebrovascular event. Despite extensive investigation, no underlying cause or contributing factors could be identified. He went on to make a full recovery from his stroke, and after two years applied for renewal of his medical certificate. This presentation discusses the aeromedical certification process, including the restrictions and health surveillance measures put in place once he was recertified.

Simon May

Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine, Volume 10 , 11–12

Conference Presentation | 27-June-2018

COLOUR VISION TESTING: SCIENCE OR JUST BAD HABITS?

future aeromedical certification processes.

David Collis

Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine, Volume 10 , 6–8

Case Study | 20-December-2018

PLEOMORPHIC SARCOMA IN A PILOT

ABSTRACT Sarcomas are rare malignant soft tissue tumours. This case report outlines a 45 year old pilot, presenting with a non-tender mass in his left medial thigh, subsequently diagnosed with a pleomorphic sarcoma. His management consisted of radiotherapy and surgical removal. Grading was considered FNCLCC grade 3 and there were no metastases. Surgery was followed by a structured rehabilitation program. The paper discusses aeromedical considerations for return to flying duties, regarding the

Katrina Franke

Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine, Volume 10 , 1–3

review-article | 29-January-2021

VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM

. For a proximal DVT or PE this increases to 10% and 30% respectively. For a second episode of unprovoked VTE the risk increases to 15% at 1 year and 45% at 5 years. For a provoked VTE due to surgery or cancer, in comparison, the risk is 1% at 1 year and 3% at 5 years which fits within aeromedical risk guidelines such as the 1% rule. EFFECT OF TREATMENT OF CLINICAL CONDITION ON FUNCTIONAL CAPABILITY Incapacitation due to side-effects of medication such as major haemorrhage The main concern with

Rachel MacKellar

Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine, Volume 12 , 25–30

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