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  • International Journal Of Orientation And Mobility

 

research-article

Acceptability of fall prevention strategies for older people with vision impairment

Falls are a major health concern for older people (Clarke et al. 2015), with a third of those over the age of 65 years likely to experience a fall each year (Campbell et al. 1990). Older people with vision impairment are at a higher risk of falls estimated as eight times more likely to experience a fall, as well as a fall that results in a fracture (Ivers et al. 2002). This demographic are at a higher risk of falls because of difficulty detecting hazards (Legood et al. 2002), but it is also

Lisa Dillon, Patricia Duffy, Anne Tiedemann, Lisa Keay

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 1–9

Article

An Overview of GPS Systems and Adaptations: Implications for the Older User with Vision Impairment

Accessible global positioning systems (GPS) are increasingly popular as an orientation aid for people with vision impairment. Adapted GPS such as the BrailleNote, Trekker, Trekker Breeze and Wayfinder Access are discussed. Limitations of adapted GPS devices for the older user are considered. Major benefits of the older user with vision impairment using GPS include independent mobility, increased confidence in wayfinding and decreased reliance on memory for navigation tasks.      

Karen Doobov, Grad.Cert.Educational Studies, Graduate Student M.Spec.Ed.

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 81–86

Article

Feasibility and acceptability of orientation and mobility instructors delivering the LiFE falls prevention program to older people with vision impairment.

Older people with vision impairment are at an increased risk of falls. Though exercise-based intervention can reduce falls in the general population, this strategy has not been successful among people with vision impairment. We evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of the LiFE program, a home-based fall prevention program, for people aged over 50 with vision impairment (n=16). The program was successfully delivered by orientation and mobility instructors to clients of Guide Dogs NSW/ACT

Lisa Keay, Ph.D., MPH, Freya Saich, B.Health, Lindy Clemson, Ph.D., Lisa Middlemiss, B.PhysEd/Health Ed., M.Spec.Ed., Jacqueline Johnson, B.A., GradDip.Ed., M.Spec.Ed., Haley Tumanik, M.Spec.Ed., Jessica Taylor, B.Sc., M.Spec.Ed., Joanne Munro, B.AppSc (Physio), M.Hlth Sci (Edu), Ewa Borkowski, M.Spec.Ed., Frances Tinsley, DipOT, DipBusiness, M.Sc.

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 22–33

Article

Teaching Orientation and Mobility Skills to Students with Autism and Vision Impairment in Public Schools: A Data-Based Study

Two students with autism, vision impairment, and intellectual disability participated in an orientation and mobility (O&M) intervention to travel in school settings using their folding canes. A multiple-baseline across participants design to determine the effectiveness of the intervention was used. The dependent variable was time taken to travel the specified route. The independent variable was O&M training. Results indicated that both participants took less time to travel during the

Devender R. Banda, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Phoebe A. Okungu, Ph.D., Nora Griffin-Shirley, Ph.D., Melanie K. Meeks, Ph.D., Olaya Landa-Vialard, Ph.D.

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 34–43

Article

Opinions by People with Vision Impairment about Wanting or Not Wanting Guide Dogs

This article presents the results of a questionnaire about daily living, and particular opinions about guide dogs by Japanese people with vision impairment who are not guide dog users. Reasons for respondents not applying for guide dogs are provided, and suggestions are made to improve the services by Japanese Guide Dog Associations. Overall, the majority of respondents were aware of the functions of guide dogs, however information about financial assistance and support services were unknown

Naoko Koda, Ph.D., Nae Morioka, B.S.A., Masumi Kubo, B.S.W., Takafumi Wada, Akira Yoshikawa, Hirofumi Nakamura, Rinka Shinoda

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 21–31

Article

Feasibility of Orientation and Mobility Services for Young Children with Vision Impairment using Teleintervention

The demand for orientation and mobility (O&M) training for very young children with blindness or vision impairment (B/VI) and their families is increasing in the Early Intervention (EI) period. However, the extreme shortage of qualified O&M specialists to work with this population may be limiting their access to appropriate services. This study used a needs assessment survey to collect information about the feasibility of providing O&M services in EI using the alternative service

Hong Phangia Dewald, M.A., COMS, Catherine A. Smyth, M.S. (Ed.), TSVI, ECE Specialist

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 83–92

Article

Early Intervention Orientation and Mobility: A Western Australian Perspective

Bronwen Scott, Grad. Cert. Vision Impairment (O&M)

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 70–72

Article

A study of personnel preparation of teachers of learners with vision impairment and O&M services

A review of the 50 US state education websites revealed wide variation among state O&M credentials. Less than half of the states designated a qualified provider as a credentialed O&M specialist and many identified a role for the Teachers of Learners with Vision Impairment (TVI) in providing Individualised Education Program (IEP)-driven O&M-related services. A survey of US Personnel Preparation programs preparing TVIs asked respondents to select the O&M curricular items they

Grace Ambrose-Zaken, Ed.D.

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 62–83

Article

Toxoplasmosis and Vision Impairment

Lyndel Bosman, B.Ec., Dip.Ed., M.Spec.Ed.

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 53–58

Article

Guide Dogs Queensland Volunteer Peer Support Program

This pilot study conducted between January 2010 and December 2014, investigated whether or not a structured peer support program would benefit people with vision impairment. The program was designed to provide support and information to clients over the telephone about mobility and vision conditions. Fourteen volunteers with vision impairment who provided the telephone support were matched with 71 clients with vision impairment. On completion of each client’s support program an evaluation

Karen Stitt, B.SoSci., Masters Counselling

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 119–126

research-article

What's in a word? Distinguishing between Habilitation and Re-habilitation

J. Hayton, D. Dimitriou

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 1–4

Article

Student Portfolios in O&M: A window into the child’s learning experience

Two students with autism, vision impairment, and intellectual disability participated in an orientation and mobility (O&M) intervention to travel in school settings using their folding canes. A multiple-baseline across participants design to determine the effectiveness of the intervention was used. The dependent variable was time taken to travel the specified route. The independent variable was O&M training. Results indicated that both participants took less time to travel during the

Fabiana Perla, Ed.D. COMS, CLVT, Jamie Maffit, M.S., COMS, CLVT

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 44–51

Article

Shuffling the Deckchairs: Multi-agency Working and the Continuing Lack of Identification of People with Vision Impairments

Many orientation and mobility (O&M) professionals working to meet the needs of children and adults with vision impairment may do so as a part of multi-agency rehabilitation teams. However, from a study of current literature in the fields of vision impairment, multiple-disability and intellectual disability, it is apparent that multiagency participation does not invariably identify with accuracy, all those requiring a service. This article discusses how those professionals working in multi

John Ravenscroft, Ph.D.

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 83–86

research-article

Virtual O&M: A far north queensland innovation

Transition to high school, though generally a positive experience, can be a tumultuous experience for many teenagers. According to Suldo and Shaunessy-Dedrick (2013, p. 195), high school incorporates “more difficult coursework, different organizational structures, new peers, more students, and different expectations from teachers”. In addition, for students with vision impairment (SVI) navigating an unfamiliar environment can present significant difficulties. For some SVI, learning about and

Katrina Blake, Helen Kinnane, Melinda Whipp

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 1–4

Article

TrekAbout Adelaide: One Agency’s Experience of Introducing GPS Technology to O&M Services

Guide Dogs Association of South Australia and Northern Territory (Guide Dogs SA.NT) provides Orientation & Mobility (O&M) programs for people with vision impairment, including training in the use of Electronic Travel Aids (ETAs). Recent developments in wayfinding technology have included introduction of specialised Global Positioning System (GPS) devices for people with vision impairment. This article describes considerations that were made by Guide Dogs SA.NT in selecting wayfinding

Adrian Riessen, B.App.Sc., Grad.Cert.Health, M.Spec.Ed., Alison Ryan, B.App.Sc., M.Spec.Ed., Mark Battista, B.Sec.Ed., M.Spec.Ed.

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 73–80

Article

Back to the Future: Expanding the Profession – O&M for People with Disabilities

In the U.S. and Australia, O&M training has evolved from service provision solely to people with vision impairment, to people with vision impairment and additional disabilities, to people with sight who have functional mobility needs. Expansion of O&M training to include people with sight who have mobility needs responds to: (i) a demand by senior management for organisational cost efficiencies; (ii) social and education policies that require people with disabilities to be mobile so

Bruce Blasch, Ph.D., Desirée Gallimore, Ph.D., MBA

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 21–33

Article

A Step to Prevent Falls in the Elderly: A Literature Review

This paper reviews the current literature to identify the way an orientation and mobility (O&M) instructor could effectively predict and/or reduce falls in the Australian-based elderly population with vision impairment. Common causes of falls associated with elderly people with vision impairment are discussed as are the shortcomings of falls prevention programs. Three assessment tools used to predict an individual’s risk of falling for the first time have been reviewed. Of the three

Jessica Taylor, B.Sc., M.Spec.Ed.

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 45–52

Article

Colour and Fashion: Evolution of the Mobility Cane

A review of the history of the long cane and its evolution into a mobility aid for the 21st Century. The long cane maintains its primary function as a tool for people with vision impairment to move around the environment safely and efficiently. However, the long cane can also be customised to suit personal needs and preferences, including the choice of colour.  

Ewa Borkowski, M.Spec.Ed.

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 65–72

Article

Temporal spatial parameters analysis of the gait in children with vision impairment

Andréia Naomi Sankako, Paulista Marília, Paulo Roberto Garcia Lucareli, Sebastião Marcos Ribeiro de Carvalho, Lígia Maria Presumido Braccialli

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 90–100

Article

Providing Orientation and Mobility Services to People from Chinese Backgrounds in Sydney, Australia

Australia is a multicultural country with a large number of older people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds who require orientation and mobility (O&M) services. Guide Dogs NSW/ACT receives a majority of CALD referrals for people with vision impairment from Chinese backgrounds. To enable clients from CALD backgrounds achieve mobility goals that complement their lifestyle, it is necessary that O&M providers foster culturally competent perspectives to enhance and

Ying Wah Wan, B.Phil., M.Spec.Ed., Grad. Dip.

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 44–48

Article

Principles for Providing Orientation and Mobility to People with Vision Impairment and Multiple Disabilities

Dona Sauerburger, M.A., C.O.M.S., Eileen Siffermann, M.A., M.Ed., C.O.M.S., Sandra Rosen, Ph.D., C.O.M.S.

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 52–56

Article

A Balance Act: Physiotherapy as a Prerequisite to Orientation and Mobility Services

The School of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Australia initiated a community practicum for fourth year physiotherapy students. The goal was to broaden student’s perspectives about how allied health areas such as Orientation & Mobility (O&M) services are movement based similar to that of physiotherapy services. The authors participated in a five-week practicum at an organisation that provides O&M services to clients with vision impairment. It

Louise Chambers, Jasan Dannaway

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 87–89

abstract

Exploring the dualism of vision – visual function and functional vision

Professionals working in the specialised field of vision impairment face high expectations from the people they support. In their role, professionals must implement strategies that mitigate for the impact of vision impairment for groups of people who have diverse requirements. This support must be individually tailored to suit the needs and aspirations of the person and their community, and to address the challenges posed by any existing eye and/or vision condition/s. Consequently

Susan Silveira

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 1–10

Article

There’s more to a dog guide than meets the eye: A preliminary exploration of potential health benefits of dog guide use

The value of dog guides in terms of mobility for people with severe vision impairment and blindness is well recognised. There has, however, been a paucity of research exploring the potential health benefits of working with dog guides. This article reports the initial stage of a research project, which aimed at redressing this dearth of research. The study used three focus groups to explore the experiences of 22 participants from three Australian states. The focus group meetings were the first

Geraldine Lane, Brian Matthews, Caroline Ellison, Carolyn Palmer

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 27–36

Article

Providing Travel Instruction to Individuals with Disabilities Other Than Blindness: A Practitioner’s Perspective

Some Orientation &Mobility (O&M) specialists provide instruction to individuals with disabilities other than blindness and vision impairment. In the US, this practice is referred to as travel instruction (TI). Through decades of providing TI, the authors have learned basic principles for success. This practice report addresses the definition of travel instruction, the essential components of a TI program, and two brief case studies. Advantages and opposition to O&M specialists

Bonnie Dodson-Burk, B.S., M.A. COMS., Lydia Peterson, B.S., M.S., COMS., Susan Olsson, M.A., COMS

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 68–73

Article

Evaluating the Validity of Texas 2 STEPS

STEPS was also found to be user friendly regardless of the COMS years of experience. Together these findings indicate that the Texas 2 STEPS has the potential to be a valid and reliable tool for assessing O&M skills in children with vision impairment.  

Tracy L. Hallak, M.Ed., TVI/COMS Instructor, Luis E. Aguerrevere, Ph.D.

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 84–89

Article

iPhone video link FaceTime as an orientation tool: Remote O&M for people with vision impairment

Nicole Holmes, B.A. (Soc/Psych)., M.Spec.Ed, Kelly Prentice, B.A. (SocScPsych)/Teaching(Prim), M.Spec.Ed

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 60–67

research-article

The impact of functional vision changes on independent travel for individuals with adult-onset visual impairment

The prevalence of adults diagnosed with adventitious conditions causing blindness and vision impairment is rapidly increasing. Murphy (2008) projected that by the year 2020, 50 million Americans will be diagnosed with vision impairment. Likewise, the 2010 survey conducted by the National Health Interview documented that 9% of the American population over the age of 18 has some type of vision loss, even with corrective lenses (Schiller et al., 2012). Conditions that cause adult-onset vision loss

Kimberly Avila

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 1–9

Article

Orientation and Mobility Client Evaluation Tool (CET) Adult

the O&M specialist, measures the degree of vision impairment; client complexity, and the environmental complexity in which the training is being conducted. Part 2 includes the mobility specialist’s rating of the client’s skill and confidence level; and the client’s rating of their own skill and confidence as well as a rationale for their ratings. The tool appears effective in measuring client outcomes for all types of O&M program in any environment; is quick and easy to

Desirée Gallimore, Ph.D., MBA, Lisa Keay, Ph.D., MPH, Frances Tinsley, DipOT, DipBusiness, MSc (Rehab. Counselling)

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility , ISSUE 1, 37–61

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