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Article

Time in the shelter: Asylum, destitution and legal uncertainty

Introduction I would last see Naveed in late January 2013. We were both in the Longsight Community Church in Manchester, United Kingdom (UK) which opens its doors as an emergency night shelter for refused asylum seekers and destitute refugees every Friday night over the winter months between November and April. Naveed was holding documents for an upcoming appointment with immigration authorities. It was his last chance to ‘get papers’, he said. Naveed pulled out letters, London bound train

Mark Justin Rainey

Borderlands , ISSUE 2, 138–164

Article

Spaces of exclusion: The visual construction of Australian borders and the asylum seeker subject in television news reports of the 2013 Australian Federal Election

This research contributes to the field of multimodal critical discourse enquiry (Bowcher & Royce 2013, Jewitt, Bezemer & O’Halloran 2016), addressing the current dearth of studies which critically analyse both visual and verbal television news data. While close linguistic examinations of asylum seeker discourse within print media are abundant, research which examines the content and conventions of visual and linguistic rhetoric used in television news especially, and their roles in shaping

Leicha Stewart

Borderlands , ISSUE 2, 85–115

Article

Transgressing borders with participatory video technologies: Reflections on creative knowledge production with asylum seekers in Australia

dehumanise individuals and censor the public’s engagement with asylum seekers, through physical borders at onshore and offshore detention centres. These borders solidify when the media circulates pervasive toxic atmospheres of xenophobic nationalism that fix those seeking asylum as illegals and potential terrorists. Given the emergence of these carceral sites that fuel despair, fear and anxiety, this article highlights the role that city spaces play in dismantling physical and metaphorical borders. We

Michele Lobo, Kaya Barry

Borderlands , ISSUE 2, 8–36

Article

Travelling narratives and images in times of migration

Introduction Migrant narratives and aesthetic practices influenced by experiences of exile and migration constitute a growing field in contemporary art and literature. Current trends in migration and globalisation have lead to an increase in travelling narratives, images and objects, and the production of aesthetic practices describing and problematising exile and migration, working in and through tradition. Migratory patterns and issues related to the protection of refugees and asylum seekers

Sigrun Åsebø, Anje Müller Gjesdal, Camilla Skalle

Borderlands , ISSUE 1, 1–11

Article

Bordering: Creating, contesting and resisting practice

whereby admission routes are policed, people are detained in offshore and onshore centres and are subjected to long and often indefinite waiting, asylum seekers are criminalised and access to welfare is restricted or even withheld. This crafting of a ‘hostile environment’ is designed to deter refugees while enabling governments to fulfil their formal commitments to international refugee law (Gammeltoft-Hansen and Hathaway 2015, p. 7). Thus, while stigmatisation may be used to create borders

Elise Klein, Uma Kothari

Borderlands , ISSUE 2, 1–7

Article

Bordering: Creating, contesting and resisting practice

whereby admission routes are policed, people are detained in offshore and onshore centres and are subjected to long and often indefinite waiting, asylum seekers are criminalised and access to welfare is restricted or even withheld. This crafting of a ‘hostile environment’ is designed to deter refugees while enabling governments to fulfil their formal commitments to international refugee law (Gammeltoft-Hansen and Hathaway 2015, p. 7). Thus, while stigmatisation may be used to create borders

Elise Klein, Uma Kothari

Borderlands , ISSUE 1, 1–7

Article

No Friend but the Mountains and Manus prison theory: In conversation

Introduction Since 1992 Australia has been indefinitely detaining people seeking asylum who arrive by boat. Immigration detention centres have been set up around the country for this purpose with most of them in remote locations where there is little or no access to amenities, services and community and legal support networks. In 2001 the conservative Howard government set up offshore detention centres on former colonies Nauru (for women, unaccompanied minors and families) and Manus Island

Behrouz Boochani, Omid Tofighian

Borderlands , ISSUE 1, 8–26

Article

Westphalian sovereignty as a zombie category in Australia

; McNevin 2019, p. 3). This article argues that Westphalian sovereignty thus acts as what Ulrich Beck and Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim (2002) describe as a ‘Zombie Category’, a social conception that no longer accurately describes anything but continues to inform perceptions of social phenomena. The zombie nature of Westphalian sovereignty is analysed in this article in relation to the state exclusion of Indigenous Australians 1 and asylum seekers attempting to reach Australia by boat. Drawing on the

Louis Everuss

Borderlands , ISSUE 1, 115–146

research-article

A Relational Hyperlink Analysis of an Online Social Movement

distinct approach for modeling hyperlink data using the example of an online social movement - the asylum seeker advocacy movement in Australia. The choice of an online social movement to illustrate RHA is based upon the expectation that these online actors exhibit the social and informal hyperlinking behavior that RHA is specifically designed to model. More specifically, as with Shumate and Dewitt (2008) and Ackland and O’Neil (forthcoming), we conceptualize advocacy groups as engaging in online

Dean Lusher, Robert Ackland

Journal of Social Structure , ISSUE 1, 1–49

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