Search

  • Select Article Type
  • Abstract Supplements
  • Blood Group Review
  • Call to Arms
  • Hypothesis
  • In Memoriam
  • Interview
  • Introduction
  • Short Report
  • abstract
  • Abstracts
  • Article
  • book-review
  • case-report
  • case-study
  • Clinical Practice
  • Commentary
  • Conference Presentation
  • conference-report
  • congress-report
  • Correction
  • Editorial
  • Editorial Comment
  • Erratum
  • Events
  • Letter
  • Letter to Editor
  • mini-review
  • minireview
  • News
  • non-scientific
  • Obituary
  • original-paper
  • Original Research
  • Pictorial Review
  • Position Paper
  • Practice Report
  • Preface
  • Preliminary report
  • Product Review
  • rapid-communication
  • Report
  • research-article
  • Research Communicate
  • research-paper
  • Research Report
  • Review
  • review -article
  • review-article
  • Review Paper
  • Sampling Methods
  • Scientific Commentary
  • short-communication
  • short-report
  • Student Essay
  • Varia
  • Welome
  • Select Journal
  • Immunohematology

 

Report

Validation of a blood group genotyping method based on high-resolution melting curve analysis

The detection of polymorphism is the basis of blood group genotyping and phenotype prediction. Genotyping may be useful to determine blood groups when serologic results are unclear. The development and application of different methods for blood group genotyping may be needed as a substitute for blood group typing. The purpose of this study is to establish an approach for blood group genotyping based on a melting curve analysis of realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using DNA extracted

Tianxiang Gong, Ying Hong, Naihong Wang, Xuemei Fu, Changhua Zhou

Immunohematology, Volume 30 , ISSUE 4, 161–165

Article

Blood group genotyping: the power and limitations of the Hemo ID Panel and MassARRAY platform

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), is a sensitive analytical method capable of resolving DNA fragments varying in mass by a single nucleotide. MALDI-TOF MS is applicable to blood group genotyping, as the majority of blood group antigens are encoded by single nucleotide polymorphisms. Blood group genotyping by MALDI-TOF MS can be performed using a panel (Hemo ID Blood Group Genotyping Panel, Agena Bioscience Inc., San Diego, CA) that is

Rhiannon S. McBean, Catherine A. Hyland, Robert L. Flower

Immunohematology, Volume 31 , ISSUE 2, 75–80

Case report

Blood group genotyping in a multitrauma patient: a case report

blood cell concentrates. This case demonstrates how the use of blood group genotyping in an acute setting can lead to a decrease in the unnecessary use of group O, D– blood products.

Joyce Curvers, Volkher Scharnhorst, Masja de Haas, Loes Warnier-Wandel, Daan van de Kerkhof

Immunohematology, Volume 28 , ISSUE 3, 85–87

Article

Concordance of two polymerase chain reaction–based blood group genotyping platforms for patients with sickle cell disease

rare donor registries is required to obtain high-prevalence antigen-negative blood for transfusion. Several studies have compared molecular genotyping platforms with serologic phenotyping in patients and donors, with excellent concordance rates.16,19–21 Two PCR-based molecular genotyping platforms commercially available in the United States for blood group genotyping are the human erythrocyte antigen (HEA) PreciseType (formerly HEA BeadChip; Immucor, Norcross, GA) and ID CORE XT (Progenika-Grifols

C.A. Sheppard, N.L. Bolen, G. Meny, M. Kalvelage, G. Ochoa-Garay

Immunohematology, Volume 36 , ISSUE 4, 123–128

Report

Application of real-time PCR and melting curve analysis in rapid Diego blood group genotyping

The paucity of appropriate reagents for serologic typing of the Diego blood group antigens has prompted the development of a real-time PCR and melting curve analysis for Diego blood group genotyping. In this study, we phenotyped 4326 donor blood samples for Dia using semiautomated equipment. All 157 Di(a+) samples were then genotyped by PCR using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) for DI*02 because of anti-Dib scarcity. Of the 4326 samples, we simultaneously tested 160 samples for Dia and Dib

Marcia C. Zago Novaretti, Azulamara da Silva Ruiz, Pedro Enrique Dorlhiac-Llacer, Dalton Alencar Fisher Chamone

Immunohematology, Volume 26 , ISSUE 2, 66–70

Report

The potential of blood group genotyping for transfusion medicine practice

Connie M. Westhoff

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 4, 190–195

Article

An overview of the use of SNaPshot for predicting blood group antigens

The use of SNaPshot (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA) for predicting blood group antigens has emerged as an alternative to hemagglutination testing and also to the current low- and highthroughput blood group genotyping methods. Several groups have developed multiplex–polymerase chain reaction SNaPshot assays to determine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in blood group genes with the purpose of identifying clinically relevant antigens and rare alleles. The selection of SNPs is

Flavia R.M. Latini, Lilian M. Castilho

Immunohematology, Volume 31 , ISSUE 2, 53–57

Article

DNA from urine sediment or buccal cells can be used for blood group molecular genotyping

Marion E. Reid, Maria J. Rios, Kevin L. Cash, Annie M. Strupp, Joan M. Uehlinger

Immunohematology, Volume 15 , ISSUE 2, 61–65

Article

Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay for blood group genotyping, copy number quantification, and analysis of  RH variants

Barbera Veldhuisen, C. Ellen van der Schoot, Masja de Haas

Immunohematology, Volume 31 , ISSUE 2, 58–61

Report

DNA-based assays for patient testing: their application, interpretation, and correlation of results

Christine Lomas-Francis, Helene DePalma

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 4, 180–190

Article

Mass-scale donor red cell genotyping using real-time array technology

Gregory A. Denomme, Michael J. Schanen

Immunohematology, Volume 31 , ISSUE 2, 69–74

Article

Blood group antigen profile predicted by molecular biology— use of real-time polymerase chain reaction to genotype important KEL,JK, RHD, and RHCE alleles

-genotype correlations were obtained. The potential use of the presented methods can be predicted in clinical transfusion medicine,allowing appropriate monitoring, early intervention, and improved care. When blood group genotyping techniques are necessary, this methodology is highly competitive for a routine laboratory.

Fernando Manuel Ferreira Araújo, Christiana Pereira, Fátima Monteiro, Isabel Henriques, Elsa Meireles, Pedro Lacerda, Ana Aleixo, Regina Celeste, Luis M. Cunha-Ribeiro, Maria J. Rodrigues

Immunohematology, Volume 18 , ISSUE 3, 59–64

Report

Molecular analyses of GYPB in African Brazilians

Ricardo Omoto, Marion E. Reid, Lilian Castilho

Immunohematology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 4, 148–153

No Record Found..
Page Actions