Search

  • Select Article Type
  • Abstract Supplements
  • Blood Group Review
  • Call to Arms
  • Communications
  • Hypothesis
  • In Memoriam
  • Interview
  • Introduction
  • Letter to the Editor
  • Short Report
  • abstract
  • Abstracts
  • Article
  • book-review
  • case-report
  • case-study
  • Clinical Practice
  • Commentary
  • Conference Presentation
  • conference-report
  • congress-report
  • Correction
  • critical-appraisal
  • Editorial
  • Editorial Comment
  • Erratum
  • Events
  • in-memomoriam
  • Letter
  • Letter to Editor
  • mini-review
  • minireview
  • News
  • non-scientific
  • Obituary
  • original-paper
  • original-report
  • Original Research
  • Pictorial Review
  • Position Paper
  • Practice Report
  • Preface
  • Preliminary report
  • Product Review
  • rapid-communication
  • Report
  • research-article
  • Research Communicate
  • research-paper
  • Research Report
  • Review
  • review -article
  • review-article
  • review-paper
  • Review Paper
  • Sampling Methods
  • Scientific Commentary
  • serologic-method-review
  • short-communication
  • short-report
  • Student Essay
  • Varia
  • Welome
  • Select Journal
  • Journal Of Nematology

 

Original Research | 18-July-2017

Diversity of Root-knot Nematodes Associated with Tubers of Yam (Dioscorea spp.) Established Using Isozyme Analysis and Mitochondrial DNA-based Identification

identified using enzyme phenotyping (esterase and malate dehydrogenase) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (Nad5) barcoding. Examination of 48 populations revealed that yam tubers were infested by Meloidogyne incognita (69%), followed by M. javanica (13%), M. enterolobii (2%), and M. arenaria (2%). Most of the tubers sampled (86%) were infected by a single species, and multiple species of RKN were detected in 14% of the samples. Results of both identification methods revealed the

Yao A. Kolombia, Gerrit Karssen, Nicole Viaene, P. Lava Kumar, Nancy de Sutter, Lisa Joos, Danny L. Coyne, Wim Bert

Journal of Nematology, Volume 49 , ISSUE 2, 177–188

research-article | 21-October-2020

First report of southern root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, infecting Brassica nigra in Peru

Province, Peru. In order to identify the plant-parasitic nematode species, a combination of morphological, biochemical, and molecular analyses were performed. Figure 1: A and B: Roots of Brassica nigra (L.) W.D.J. Koch showing galls induced by Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White, 1919; Chitwood, 1949). This population of root-knot nematode was identified to species with esterase phenotypes (n = 36 females) (Carneiro and Almeida, 2001); morphology, and morphometrics of second-stage juveniles

Jorge Airton Gómez-Chatata, Juan José Tamo-Zegarra, Teodocia Gloria Casa-Ruiz, Cristiano Bellé

Journal of Nematology, Volume 52 , 1–3

research-article | 30-November-2020

First report of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, infecting hops, Humulus lupulus, in São Paulo, Brazil

nodules, characterizing the galls; C. Isoenzymatic esterase phenotype (I1 = M. incognita) of females recovered from hops roots Mi.1 and Mi.2; J3 = M. javanica (Treub, 1885) Chitwood, 1949, control. Trapezoidal labial region of male (a), a prominent labial disc in relation to the submedian lips with transverse streaks (b) and the stylet basal knobs height than wide (c); D. Perineal region of a female with high, trapezoidal dorsal arch and thick streaks, typical of M. incognita. São Paulo, Brazil

R. F. Gonsaga, A. Souza Pollo, D. D. Nascimento, R. J. Ferreira, L. T. Braz, P. L. M. Soares

Journal of Nematology, Volume 53 , 1–4

research-article | 30-November-2020

First report of rice root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne graminicola, infecting Juncus microcephalus in Brazil

graminicola Golden and Birchfield, 1965, root infestation symptoms on South American rush (Juncus microcephalus Kunth). Root-knot symptoms of galls of J. microcephalus from the field (A, B) and in the greenhouse (C, D). This species was identified from esterase using esterase phenotypes (n = 20 females) (Carneiro and Almeida 2001; Carneiro et al., 2000), morphological measurement of second-stage juveniles (J2) (n = 20), females (n = 10) and males (n = 10), and perineal patterns (n = 20) and through the

Cristiano Bellé, Paulo Sergio dos Santos, Tiago Edu Kaspary

Journal of Nematology, Volume 53 , 1–4

research-article | 24-April-2020

First report of southern root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, infecting pomegranate, Punica granatum, in Peru

identified to species with esterase phenotypes (n = 36 females) (Carneiro and Almeida, 2001); morphology and morphometrics of second-stage juveniles (J2) (n = 30) and females (n = 10), and perineal patterns (n = 15); and molecular characterization of the mitochondrial DNA region between the cytochome oxidase subunit II (COII) and 16 S rRNA genes (mtDNA) using the primers C2F3 (5´-GGTCAATGTTCAGAAATTTGTGG-3´) and 1108 (5´-TACCTTTGACCAATCACGCT-3´) (Powers and Harris, 1993) along with PCR species-specific

Ricardo Andreé Vega-Callo, María Yaquelin Mendoza-Lima, Nataly Ruth Mamani-Mendoza, Leslie Sharon Lozada-Villanueva, Juan José Tamo-Zegarra, Teodocia Gloria Casa-Ruiz, Cristiano Bellé

Journal of Nematology, Volume 52 , 1–3

research-article | 21-October-2020

Chenopodium album is a weed host of Meloidogyne incognita (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae) in Peru

 = 20), and perineal patterns (n = 20 females), esterase phenotypes (n = 36 females), and molecular characterization of the mitochondrial DNA region between the cytochome oxidase subunit II (COII) and 16S rRNA genes (mtDNA) using the primers C2F3 and 1108 (Powers and Harris, 1993); along with PCR species-specific characterized amplified region (SCAR) sequence for confirmation, using a primer set composed of inc-K14-F and inc-K14-R (Randig et al., 2002). The nematode population density observed in

Jorge Airton Gómez-Chatata, Teodocia Gloria Casa-Ruiz, Juan José Tamo-Zegarra, Cristiano Bellé

Journal of Nematology, Volume 52 , 1–4

research-article | 30-November-2018

First report of Meloidogyne javanica (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae) infecting Scoparia dulcis, a medicinal plant in Brazil

molecular analyses were performed. Figure 1: Sweet broom (Scoparia dulcis L.) roots showing galls caused by Meloidogyne javanica (Treub, 1885) Chitwood, 1949 infection. To identify this Meloidogyne population, the following techniques were used: esterase phenotypes (n = 40 females) (Carneiro and Almeida, 2001); morphology and morphometrics of second-stage juveniles (J2) (n = 40) and females (n = 20), and perineal patterns (n = 20); and molecular characterization of the mitochondrial DNA region

Cristiano Bellé, Rodrigo Ferraz Ramos, Andressa Lima de Brida, Tiago Edu Kaspary

journal of nematology, Volume 51 , 1–3

research-article | 30-November-2018

New Hosts and Records in Portugal for the Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne luci

(Aydınlı et al., 2013; Carneiro et al., 2014; Bellé et al., 2016; Janssen et al., 2016; Machado et al., 2016). Currently, there are about 26 different plant species recognized as hosts for M. luci (EPPO, 2017). Because of its morphological resemblance to M. ethiopica Whitehead, 1968 and similar esterase phenotype, M. luci might have been misidentified as M. ethiopica in a number of surveys. Therefore, it is highly probable that this RKN has an even broader host range and distribution than is currently

Duarte Santos, António Correia, Isabel Abrantes, Carla Maleita

Journal of Nematology, Volume 51 , 1–4

research-article | 30-November-2019

First report of Meloidogyne naasi parasitizing turfgrass in Portugal

measurements in µm. a, c De Man indices; n.d. not determined. Biochemical identification was performed by esterase phenotype analysis. Females were excised from infected roots of the turfgrass mix and transferred to sealed micro-hematocrit tubes with 5 μl of extraction buffer (20% sucrose with 1% Triton X-100) and macerated with a pestle. After centrifugation, the protein extracts were submitted to electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels according to Pais and Abrantes (1989). Gels were stained for

M. Clara Vieira dos Santos, M. Teresa M. Almeida, Sofia R. Costa

Journal of Nematology, Volume 52 , 1–4

research-article | 30-November-2019

Further observations on Meloidogyne enterolobii (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae) infecting guava (Psidium guajava) in India

spacer (ITS) region, and the sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) combined with morphological, morphometric and biochemical (e.g. esterase phenotyping) data provides better resolution for species identification. We found a severe infestation of M. enterolobii in guava in Coimbatore district of Tamil Nadu, India (located at N11°1′6″ and E76°58′21″); and the identity of the species was confirmed by detailed morphology and morphometrics supplemented with biochemical and molecular

Tushar Manohar Ghule, Victor Phani, Vishal Singh Somvanshi, Maya Patil, Somnath Bhattacharyya, Matiyar Rahaman Khan

Journal of Nematology, Volume 52 , 1–9

research-article | 09-April-2020

First report of the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne morocciensis infecting peach in Southern Brazil

studies (n = 20). Additionally, individual females (n = 20) were extracted from the peach roots and identified by electrophoresis using α-esterase (Est) and malate dehydrogenase (Mdh) phenotypes (Carneiro and Almeida, 2001) and perineal patterns (Taylor and Netscher, 1974). The nematode population density in the samples was 283 eggs and J2s per gram of fresh roots. Perineal patterns of females (Fig. 2B,C) showed oval squared shapes, with moderately high to high dorsal arches, striae widely separated

W. R. Silva, C. P. Machaca-Calsin, C. B. Gomes

Journal of Nematology, Volume 52 , 1–3

No Record Found..
Page Actions