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research-paper | 12-August-2019

Short-term exposure to high-intensity sound induces hearing loss and apoptosis in guinea pigs

the cochlea, and apoptosis was the main cause of the early death of hair cells (Zhang et al., 2014). In a study in which guinea pigs were subjected to a narrow band noise centred at 4 kHz with 110 dB, 115 dB or 120 dB sound pressure levels (SPL), it was suggested that the apoptotic process may be involved in intense noise-induced hair cell death (Hu et al., 2000). Adler et al. (1992) and Shoji et al. (2000) exposed one-day-old chicks and guinea pigs to 120, 125 and 115 dB noise for 5 h or 48 h to

Yanqing Liu, Hui Wang, Ziquan Liu, Yanjun Gu, Limin Xin, Jinyang Liu, Haojun Fan

Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis, Volume 79 , ISSUE 2, 155–168

Research Article | 22-May-2019

PATHOGENICITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHLAMYDIAE FOR HUMANS AND ANIMALS

Parilichlamydiaceae. These bacteria are considered the infectious factors of zoonoses due to the fact that they can be found among pets and livestock such as cats, guinea pigs, sheep, cattle, and even fish. Many of these animals also suffer from diseases caused by these bacteria. In this study, while characterizing environmental chlamydiae, special attention has been paid to illnesses of the respiratory tract caused by Simkania negevensis, and to the abortions among people and ruminants caused by Waddlia

Małgorzata Pawlikowska-Warych, Joanna Palma, Wiesław Deptuła

Postępy Mikrobiologii - Advancements of Microbiology, Volume 56 , ISSUE 3, 265–274

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