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  • Immunohematology

 

Article | 15-February-2021

Heat elution: a modification of the Landsteiner-Miller method

between the antibody and its antigen is reversible and is affected by the ionic strength, temperature, and pH of the testing environment. The process of removing an antibody attached to red blood cells (RBCs), either in vivo or in vitro, is termed elution, and the recovered, concentrated antibody in solution is called an eluate. Heat elution, the first RBC elution procedure,2 was described by Landsteiner and Miller3 in their studies on chimpanzees. The original method involved a 5-minute incubation at

C. Dean-El, N. Quraishy

Immunohematology, Volume 35 , ISSUE 2, 45–47

Case report | 26-October-2019

Blocked D phenomenon and relevance of maternal  serologic testing

elution and gentle heat elution (at 56°C) confirmed the presence of anti-D on neonatal RBCs. The baby received two exchange transfusions with group O, D–, packed RBCs compatible with his own serum. Later, on day 3, the neonate’s mother was typed as group AB, D–, and her serum revealed the presence of alloanti-D, -C, and -S reactive in the anti-human globulin phase. The anti-D titer was 1024. This report highlights the “blocking” phenomenon caused by maternal anti-D in

Ashish Jain, Vijay Kumawat, Neelam Marwaha

Immunohematology, Volume 31 , ISSUE 3, 116–118

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