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case-report

Treatment of subarachnoid haemorrhage complicated by hyponatraemia

Introduction: Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage can be complicated by acute hyponatraemia in neurosurgical patients. De Oliveira Manoel et al., (2016, p. 1) define aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) as ‘a complex neurovascular syndrome with profound systemic effects and is associated with high disability and mortality’. An aneurysmal SAH is the result of cerebral aneurysm rupture or trauma, thus resulting in bleeding in the subarachnoid space. Rupture of cerebral aneurysms commonly

Jordyn A Butler

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience , ISSUE 2, 1–5

Case report

Central Pontine Myelinolysis

Central Pontine Myelinolysis (CPM) commonly presents as a complication of treatment in patients with profound life threatening hyponatraemia. It occurs when the sodium level is corrected too rapidly. Hyponatraemia should never be corrected at a rate greater than 8-10mmol/L of sodium per day. Rapid correction causes extracellular tonicity and will continue to drive water out of the brain’s cells leading to cellular dysfunction. Frequent clinical signs include dysphagia

Leigh Arrowsmith, Christopher Tolar

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience , ISSUE 1, 15–19

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