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  • Statistics In Transition

 

Research paper

THE OFFICE FOR NATIONAL STATISTICS EXPERIENCE OF COLLECTING AND MEASURING SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING

The UK Office for National Statistics (ONS) started measuring subjective well- being in 2011 as part of the ONS Measuring National Well-being programme. The aim of the Measuring National Well-being programme is to measure the quality of life and progress of the UK. This article explores the development of the ONS subjective well-being measures, data collection methods, data presentational considerations, overview of findings, and latest developments. It discusses the way in which user

Lucy Tinkler

Statistics in Transition New Series , ISSUE 3, 373–396

Research paper

CONCEPTUALIZING SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING AND ITS MANY DIMENSIONS – IMPLICATIONS FOR DATA COLLECTION IN OFFICIAL STATISTICS AND FOR POLICY RELEVANCE

multidimensionality. The role of national statistics offices in measuring subjective well-being and deriving official statistics is considered next. We conclude by discussing how different characteristics of well-being constructs shape their applicability to policy. The overarching conclusion is that–while methodological limitations are present and a number of fundamental research challenges remain–understanding of how to collect and interpret data on subjective well-being has made enormous strides in the last

Christopher Mackie, Conal Smith

Statistics in Transition New Series , ISSUE 3, 335–372

Research paper

OFFICIAL STATISTICS ON PERSONAL WELL-BEING: SOME REFLECTIONS ON THE DEVELOPMENT AND SOME REFLECTIONS ON THE DEVELOPMENT AND IN THE UK  

This paper draws on experience of the UK Office for National Statistics (ONS) programme to measure national well-being, particularly the high-profile element of the programme in which subjective well-being measures have been collected and published since April 2011. We reflect on drivers of the ONS work and on how these have given rise to interest both in national well-being – the Beyond GDP agenda – and in the use of subjective well-being measures (self-reported, personal well-being) in public

Paul Allin

Statistics in Transition New Series , ISSUE 3, 397–408

Article

QUALITY OF LIFE AND POVERTY IN UKRAINE – PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT BASED ON THE SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING INDICATORS

addition, methodological approaches in national statistics practice are discussed for the case of analysis of economic deprivation and for infrastructure development as indicator of geographic accessibility of services and non-geographic barriers causing the deprivation of access. Also, this paper reviews the factors that underlie the deprivations and define the percentage of population that is particularly affected by multiple deprivation in Ukraine. It covers the data on dynamics and analyses the

Oleksandr Osaulenko

Statistics in Transition New Series , ISSUE 2, 237–247

Article

DEVELOPMENT OF SMALLAREA ESTIMATION IN OFFICIAL STATISTICS

The author begins with a general assessment of the mission of the National Statistics Institutes (NSIs), main producers of official statistics, which are obliged to deliver high quality statistical information on the state and evolution of the population, the economy, the society and the environment. These statistical results must be based on scientific principles and methods. They must be made available to the public, politics, economy and research for decision-making and information purposes

Jan Kordos

Statistics in Transition New Series , ISSUE 1, 105–132

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