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Case report | 25-January-2018

Neuroscience Nursing in Indonesia: Striving for Recognition through Education and Regional Collaboration.

As a speciality practice area, neuroscience nursing is internationally recognised. In 2014 the Australasian Neuroscience Nurses Association celebrated its 40th anniversary. For Indonesian neuroscience nurses, 2014 marked the inaguration of the Indonesian Neuroscience Nurses Association. The following paper provides an overview of health care in Indonesia and development of neuroscience nursing as a specialty through educational and regional collaboration. Postgraduate educational opportunities

Linda Nichols, Enny Mulyatsih

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 26 , ISSUE 1, 10–16

research-article | 28-November-2019

Intuition & the Expert Neuroscience Nurse

the ability to recognise and predict behaviour based on ambiguous signs, require applications of intuitive knowledge. Nursing practice involves multiple ways of knowing patients. There is a need to accept more than one mode of thought and emphasise the value of intuition in nursing. Clinical knowledge is gained over time and clinicians are often unaware of these gains. Interpretive description of actual practice uncovers this clinical insight (Ruth-Sahd, 2014; Rew & Barrow, 1987). Neuroscience

Vicki Evans

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 29 , ISSUE 2, 5–10

research-article | 30-November-2019

Oral Care for Neuroscience patients in New Zealand – A national survey

Introduction Oral care is a pertinent issue in neuroscience nursing as many patients are unable to maintain their oral hygiene due to reduced consciousness, cranial nerve palsies or limb weakness. Oral care practice is based on tradition or experience rather than evidence based (Cohn & Fulton, 2006; Coker et al., 2017). Thirteen studies on oral hygiene practice and experience in nursing were explored. Binkley et al (2004) developed a questionnaire tool which formed the basis of four surveys

Caroline Woon

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 1, 10–22

Case report | 10-January-2018

Both Sides of the Counter

Colin is a neuroscience Registered Nurse originally from the United Kingdom (UK). He had his first seizure in the UK. He and his family emigrated to Christchurch, New Zealand in 2007. Whilst at work on the neuroscience unit, Colin had another seizure resulting in a significant head injury. He was in rehab when the deadly Christchurch earthquake hit. Both Sides of the Counter covers his experience as a neuroscience nurse caring for others and then how things can quickly

Colin Woodhouse

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 1, 20–23

research-article | 30-November-2019

2020 Australasian Neuroscience Nurses’ Association (ANNA) Annual Conference Abstracts

transmissible, nurses can be fearful of caring for such a patient. Having knowledge of the disease will ensure the patient receives the compassionate care that is the heart and soul of nursing such patients. So begins our journey where we had the privilege to care for a young man admitted for investigation into our neuroscience unit. His clinical course was complicated, and his nursing care needs were uniquely specialised. Delirium in a neuroscience setting: A review of the role of early assessment and

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 2, 20–24

case-report | 30-November-2017

The complications of jejunostomy tubes for patients receiving Duodopa: New challenges for neuroscience nurses

Background: An 80 year old man with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD) was admitted to the neuroscience unit with a worsening decline in mobility. Medical management was the commencement and titration of the levodopacarbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) Duodopa ® via a naso-jejunal tube, which had been inserted under fluoroscopy in Interventional Radiology. Over a ten day trial period the patient responded well to the administration of the LCIG with much less periods of difficulty with movement (known

Rachael Elizabeth Mackinnon

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 27 , ISSUE 2, 1–4

research-article | 30-November-2019

On track to the stomach! ! Cortrak® for the insertion of nasogastric tubes amongst neuroscience patients – how effective is it?

between 2011 and 2016 resulted in 95 further incidents where 47% of tube misplacements were due to x-ray misinterpretation and 5 of these were due to the interpretation of the wrong x-ray (NHS improvement, 2016). There may also be more misplacements that went unreported. Internationally, there has been a need for accurate nasogastric placement to avoid x-rays, reduce delays in feeding, prevent repeated insertions and reduce healthcare costs (Rowat, Graham and Dennis, 2018). Neuroscience patients

Caroline Woon

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 2, 13–18

research-article | 30-November-2019

Vale Sharryn Byers

practices were challenged and adapted. Always done with clear evidence, tact and careful coercion if needed. She was never one to blend into a crowd or not express an opinion. She was to the end a loud and proud Neuroscience nurse. Through Sharryn’s investigative mind and determination to provide best practice she developed a love of research and presented many times at ANNA meetings, winning both the Tonnie Keonin and NSA prizes on more than one occasion. In past years the NSA prize winning paper

Lynette Wallace

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 1, 44–46

conference-report | 28-November-2019

2019 Australasian Neuroscience Nurses’ Association Annual Conference Abstracts

On behalf of the Executive of the Australasian Neuroscience Nurses’ Association (ANNA) it was my pleasure to welcome the delegates, presenters and sponsors to the 2019 ANNA Annual Conference at the Intercontinental Hotel, Wellington New Zealand. The Annual Conference provides an opportunity to promote the exchange of scientific ideas and knowledge, and to strengthen relationships with colleagues and this year the quality of the presentations were again outstanding. This year saw the inaugural

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 29 , ISSUE 2, 23–32

conference-report | 02-November-2018

2018 Australasian Neuroscience Nurses’ Association Annual Conference Abstracts

On behalf of the Executive of the Australasian Neuroscience Nurses’ Association (ANNA) it was my pleasure to welcome the delegates, presenters and sponsors to the 2018 ANNA Annual Conference at the Sheraton Mirage Resort on the Gold Coast. The Annual Conference provides an opportunity to promote the exchange of scientific ideas and knowledge, and to strengthen relationships with colleagues. We were once again joined together with the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia to share some of their

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 28 , ISSUE 2, 9–17

case-study | 02-November-2018

Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: A clinical case study

Introduction: This case study will examine a patient with a rare and disabling movement disorder. The primary objective of this essay seeks to critically analyse and discuss the neuroscience nursing care and interventions of multifocal motor neuropathy. Firstly, the patients’ clinical presentation, past medical history and the underlying pathophysiology of multifocal motor neuropathy will be comprehensively explored and the epidemiology, etiology and the patients’ risk factors will be

Madeline A Bone

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 28 , ISSUE 2, 4–8

Case report | 25-January-2018

Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis: Cerebral spinal fluid tumours.

enhancement indicative of meningeal irritation. The neuroscience nurse role in the patient care includes providing a supportive environment and thorough assessment of vital and neurological signs. Treatment aims to improve or maintain a patient's neurological status while prolonging survival and palliation. The literature review will highlight the diagnosis, progression and treatment for LC to further increase awareness and inform neuroscience nurses of increasing trends in management.

Megan Stone

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 26 , ISSUE 2, 11–14

Editorial | 14-June-2019

Editorial

With only two years until the 13th Quadren-nial Congress it is time for all of us to con-sider the great work that we are doing and start thinking about potential abstract sub-missions. Two years might seem a long way away, but it will come around quickly. I have recently had the absolute privilege to represent my workplace, Australia and the neuroscience nursing community at the European Stroke Organisation Conference in Milan. I was one of over 5600 partici-pants enjoying a packed program

Linda Nichols

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 29 , ISSUE 1, –

case-report | 01-May-2021

2020 Annual Demographic Survey of Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Nurse Specialists

Australasian Neuroscience Nurses Association (ANNA) Movement Disorder Chapter (MDC) with no financial funding and/or conflict of interests. The ethics application was submitted to and approved by Northern Sydney Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee 2019/ETH12872: Parkinson’s Disease Movement Disorder Nurse Specialist Demographic Survey as a low or negligible risk project. Data was collected through an anonymous online multiple choice survey produced using the website https

Susan Williams, David Tsui, Dr Melanie Zeppel

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 31 , ISSUE 1, 15–19

Case report | 10-January-2018

Timely Anticoagulant Thromboprophylaxis is Safe and Effective in the Care of Patients Suffering Traumatic Brain Injury.

morbidity. This review aims to determine the safety and efficacy of chemical VTE prophylaxis within the neurosurgical setting. The consequences of VTE can be devastating and patients with neurotrauma are amongst those at greatest risk. With this in mind, the neuroscience nurse must be meticulously conscientious for the prevention of VTE in the neurosurgical setting. The neurosurgical nurse has a close affiliation to the patient, is often the first to observe the clinical signs and symptoms associated

Kandace Micallef

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 2, 30–34

research-article | 30-November-2019

Epilepsy Surgery: A Paediatric Perspective

, Australia, contains one such example of this; a 22-bed specialized paediatric Neuroscience unit that treats and cares for patients between the ages of 0-17 with a range of Neurological and Neurosurgical concerns (SCHN, 2019). Within the ward sits a four-bed Epilepsy Monitoring unit and laboratory that was upgraded in 2011 to include innovative technologies that enable the Neurologists, Neurosurgeons and Neurophysiologists to pinpoint the epileptogenic zone of the brain responsible for seizure events

Lauren Bollard, Emily Moore, Rebecca Paff

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 2, 7–12

research-article | 30-November-2019

Newton’s Laws, G-forces and the impact on the brain

intra-cerebral pressure. These forces are also produced in the acts of vomiting, coughing and sneezing. As neuroscience nurses, the knowledge regarding the impact of these forces is known to be troublesome in relation to the consequences of these forces on intra-cerebral pressure and the homeostasis of the brain. It should be kept in mind that the involuntary act of sneezing has ramifications from a G-force perspective. The act of sneezing with an open mouth has a force of 2.9G’s. Yet holding in a

Vicki Evans

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 1, 24–29

Case report | 10-January-2018

Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow: Best Practice for CSF Sampling of an EVD to Minimise Patient Risk

Managing raised intracranial pressure (ICP) with the use of an external ventricular drain (EVD) is a common occurrence in a neurosurgical setting. A central role of the neuroscience nurse in managing that EVD is to monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of infection otherwise known as ventriculitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling from an EVD has historically been completed as a daily routine specimen to monitor for any signs of infection. However, in more recent times there has been

Ruby Crane, Nicole King

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 2, 7–11

Case report | 10-January-2018

The lived experience of adults with myasthenia gravis: A phenomenological study

relationships with others. The findings of this study highlight three main themes embedded in the data that a person with MG experiences: living with uncertainty, living with weakness and living with change. These experiences have been interpreted and discussed to gain a deep understanding of the meaning of the disease. This study raises awareness of MG for neuroscience nurses and provides a unique view of this disease.

Trudy Keer-Keer

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 1, 40–46

Case report | 10-January-2018

Effectiveness of the Sitting Position Without Back Support

Purpose: In the field of neuroscience nursing in Japan, the “sitting position without back support” (SB) has promoted earlier ambulation, improved level of consciousness, and prevented disuse syndrome in patients with disturbance of consciousness and impaired mobility. This research was conducted with the aim of examining if respiratory function improved using SB on acute patients on ventilation in ICU. Method: The research design involved daily administration of

Nobuko Okubo

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 1, 31–39

Case report | 25-January-2018

The EPIC (Excellent Practice in Communication) Project. Neurosurgical Nursing Clinical Handover Improvement Practices among acute inpatients: a Best Practice Implementation Project.

observations of nursing clinical handover was conducted and measured against seven best practice recommendations, followed by the implementation of targeted strategies and follow up audits. The baseline audit revealed deficits between current practice and best practice in four of the seven criteria. Barriers for implementation of nursing clinical handover best practice criteria were identified by the project team and a neuroscience specific nursing handover framework and bundled education strategy was

Kylie M. Wright

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 26 , ISSUE 1, 21–32

research-article | 11-October-2021

Social-cognition and dog-human interactions: Is there potential for therapeutic-interventions for the disability sector?

instructors and trainers) that use dogs to provide support, for example to adults and children with vision impairment for their mobility, or for therapeutic roles (e.g. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) (O’Haire & Rodriguez, 2018; Stern et al., 2013). This literature review will use contemporary research from two fields of research enquiry; animal-behaviour and neuroscience, to explore the notion that dog-human interactions have the potential to support the acquisition of social skills in humans. The review

M. Bellio, S. Silveira

International Journal of Orientation & Mobility, Volume 12 , ISSUE 1, 1–14

Article | 02-November-2017

EXTRACTING ELECTRIC POWER FROM HUMAN BODY FOR SUPPLYING NEURAL RECORDING SYSTEM

A powerful approach to the characterization of cellular electrical activity is electrical recording from cells or living tissues. The human central and / or peripheral nervous system has been a subject of study and fascination of the neuroscience and biomedical engineering communities for many decades. In this paper, we propose a new approach to feed implantable neural recording system, which based on extracting electrical power from human tissue warmth in order to supply a biomedical neural

G. Ben Hmida, A. L. Ekuakille, A. Kachouri, H. Ghariani, A. Trotta

International Journal on Smart Sensing and Intelligent Systems, Volume 2 , ISSUE 2, 229–245

review-article | 30-November-2019

Chondroitin sulfate metabolism in the brain

Anna Gręda, Dorota Nowicka

Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis, Volume 79 , ISSUE 4, 338–351

Research paper | 06-February-2018

Nucleus accumbens local field potential power spectrums, phase-amplitude couplings and coherences following morphine treatment

In the past decade, neural processing has been extensively studied in cognitive neuroscience. However, neural signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) that might clarify reward process remained to be investigated. Male Swiss albino ICR mice implanted with intracranial electrodes into the NAc and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were used for morphine administration and local field potential (LFP) recording. One-way ANOVA revealed significant increases in low (30.3–44.9 Hz) and high (60.5–95.7

Chayaporn Reakkamnuan, Dania Cheaha, Ekkasit Kumarnsit

Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis, Volume 77 , ISSUE 3, 214–224

Case report | 10-January-2018

Describing the role and function of Care Advisors in the Motor Neurone Disease Association of West Australia.

Gilly Smith

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 1, 8–14

Case report | 10-January-2018

Central Pontine Myelinolysis

Leigh Arrowsmith, Christopher Tolar

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 1, 15–19

Case report | 10-January-2018

Importance of a Multidisciplinary Team Approach for Optimizing Pituitary Surgery Outcomes

Amy A. Eisenberg, Nancy Mclaughlin, Pejman Cohan, Chester Griffiths, Garni Barkhoudarian, Daniel Kelly

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 1, 24–30

Editorial | 03-January-2018

Editorial and Guest Editorial

Vicki Evans, Miriam Priglinger

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 1, 6–7

Case report | 10-January-2018

A Neurological Integrated Care Pathway

Kathleen McCoy, Harriet Chan

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 2, 25–29

Case report | 10-January-2018

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Adapting to Consequences

Nutthita Petchprapai

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 2, 12–19

Case report | 10-January-2018

Enquiry into Practice: Management of Terminal Catastrophic Intracranial Haemorrhage in Palliative Care.

Anna Smith

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 2, 20–24

Editorial | 10-January-2018

Editorial and Guest Editorial

Vicki Evans, Dr Mark Dexter

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 25 , ISSUE 2, 5–6

Editorial | 25-January-2018

Editorial

Vicki Evans, Linda Nichols

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 26 , ISSUE 1, 5–6

Case report | 25-January-2018

Support My Spine ASAP. A Rural Tele-health care model for patients being managed with a Thoracic Lumbar Sacral Orthotic (TLSO).

Ryan Gallagher, Jane Morison, Michelle Giles, Judith Henderson, Sarah Zehnder

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 26 , ISSUE 1, 7–9

Case report | 25-January-2018

A Neurological Integrated Care Pathway

Kathleen McCoy, Harriet Chan

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 26 , ISSUE 1, 38–43

Case report | 25-January-2018

The Life and Trials of a Pseudomeningocoele.

Larissa Engel, Maira Manch

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 26 , ISSUE 1, 33–37

Case report | 25-January-2018

Top of the Charts: Detecting neurological deterioration more efficiently through improved documentation.

Rhiannon Carey, Christine Holland

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 26 , ISSUE 1, 17–20

Case report | 25-January-2018

Does duration and sampling of external ventricular drainage systems influence infection rate?

Nomathemba Moyo

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 26 , ISSUE 2, 7–14

Editorial | 25-January-2018

Editorial

Vicki Evans, Susan Williams

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 26 , ISSUE 2, 5–6

Case report | 25-January-2018

Clinical and health economic benefits of out-patient lumbar microdiscectomies in Australia.

Alison Magee, Ivan P Bhaskar, Paul Ilett, Michael A Murphy, Yi-Yuen Wang

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 26 , ISSUE 2, –

research-article | 30-November-2018

The Brain on Fire: A Case Study on Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis

Grissel B Crasto

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 29 , ISSUE 1, 1–8

research-article | 30-November-2018

Considering Causes for Hypoactive Delirium

Malissa A Mulkey, Sonya R Hardin, DaiWai M Olson, Cindy L Munro, Erik Everhart

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 29 , ISSUE 1, 9–16

research-article | 28-November-2019

Barriers and Facilitators to End of Life Care in Huntington’s Disease – A review of the literature

Ruth Hosken

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 29 , ISSUE 2, 33–42

research-article | 28-November-2019

The Circle of Willis, Aneurysms and Subarachnoid Haemorrhages: a Historical Narrative of Parallels from Observation to Intervention

Linda Nichols

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 29 , ISSUE 2, 12–21

case-report | 28-November-2019

Guest Editorial

It is an honour to be elected as the Australasian Neuroscience Nurses Association President at the annual conference in Wellington, New Zealand thus giving me the opportunity to lead ANNA over the next 3 years. I assure you I am dedicated to neuroscience nursing and will be committed to the role of ANNA President. I have been a neuroscience nurse for over 30 years, and have been working in the role of Clinical Nurse Consultant at Westmead Hospital for the majority of that time. Those of you

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 29 , ISSUE 2, 3–4

Editorial | 28-November-2019

Editorial

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 29 , ISSUE 2, 3–4

case-report | 13-November-2017

Drain tube removal in the presence of anticoagulation in Spinal Surgery

Case Review: A 53 year old male presented to St. Vincent’s Private Neuroscience Unit for an elective C3-C7 decompressive cervical laminectomy for chronic cervical radiculopathy of the left arm. At the time of admission he weighed 77kgs (BMI 25.5). His relevant past history included Type 2 Diabetes and osteoarthritis. His perioperative pathology was all within normal limits. Postoperatively, his recovery was unremarkable. He returned to the ward with a closed suction sub-fascial drain tube in

Christine Holland, Sarah Smith

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 27 , ISSUE 1, 14–18

case-report | 23-November-2017

Caring and Collaborating A case study on a complex patient under multiple teams

Larissa J. Engel, Mandy J. Ryan

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 27 , ISSUE 1, 19–23

case-report | 23-November-2017

Lubag Syndrome (X-linked Dystonia Parkinsonism) Case Study of Mr G. Infante

to Mr Infante’s cause. Dr Olsen and Dr Lehn had agreed without hesitation to perform the implantation surgery and the Mater Private Hospital Brisbane organised the donation of the theatre time and services of Mater Centre for Neuroscience and associated teams to improve the quality of life for Mr Infante. Mr Infante was successfully implanted bilaterally into the globus pallidus internus. Following surgery Mr Infante spent a few days in the intensive care unit before returning to the

Vincent Cheah

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 27 , ISSUE 1, 7–10

case-report | 13-November-2017

Improving oral hygiene for stroke patients

Caroline Woon

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 27 , ISSUE 1, 11–13

case-report | 13-November-2017

Guest Editorial

Vicki Evans

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 27 , ISSUE 1, 4–5

case-report | 13-November-2017

Editorial

on a card system. When I get frustrated with End Note I always try to take a deep breath and think of the alternatives. With all these changes and the anticipated changes ahead I read and take on board Vicki’s advise. For me this is another rewarding challenge in my neuroscience journey and I look forward to this next stage. Cheers and thank you for all your support and guidance Vicki.

Linda Nichols

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 27 , ISSUE 1, 4–5

Article | 26-June-2018

Malignant middle cerebral artery infarct: A clinical case report

Kwan Yee (Queenie) Leung, Sheila Jala, Rosalind Elliott

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 28 , ISSUE 1, 5–12

Article | 26-June-2018

Navigating Unchartered Waters: A Nursing Perspective on Lewy Body Dementia

Madelaine B Rañola

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 28 , ISSUE 1, 5–12

case-report | 30-November-2017

Treatment of subarachnoid haemorrhage complicated by hyponatraemia

Jordyn A Butler

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 27 , ISSUE 2, 1–5

Editorial | 14-December-2017

Editorial and Guest Editorial

publishing has eased the burden of managing paper copies, the challenge for researchers has grown exponentially with the task of locating the most recent relevant literature from the best available source a constant challenge. Neuroscience nurses must be astute and observant as effective, rapid change management continues to be at the forefront of improved outcomes. However, real change can only occur when we share those findings. The Nursing Board of Australia (2016) Standards of Practice dictate that

Linda Nichols, Dawid Cecula

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 27 , ISSUE 2, 3–4

congress-report | 14-December-2017

WFNN 2017 Congress Report

neuroscience nursing does not. Similar issues are faced the world over. Conferences like this one offers a great opportunity for networking and making new friends. However, a Congress such as this cannot run without the dedicated support of a great team of people, most of whom are volunteers. The respect and admiration for these people cannot be measured and professional and personal associations have been enhanced by this experience. Get involved and you’ll reap the rewards. The networks you make will

Vicki Evans

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 27 , ISSUE 2, 14–14

Editorial | 26-June-2018

Editorial

Translating Research As neuroscience nurses we aspire for best and evidenced based practice, but often we forget about the journey of research from being a new finding or information to translating into practice. Historically, there has been a disconnect between the academic researcher and clinical practice and the transfer of new knowledge has been sporadic at best. One particular example that comes to mind is triple H therapy where the current clinical practice still continues despite more

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 28 , ISSUE 1, 3–4

Editorial | 26-June-2018

Guest Editorial

What were you doing in 2001? How much has changed in the world of neuroscience in 17 years? This is the estimated gap between the conduct of high quality research, including randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews, and its eventual implementation into practice. In an era of increasingly rapid changes in technology and patient complexity, and increasing disparities in health outcomes according to geography and socio-economic status there are significant challenges around research

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 28 , ISSUE 1, 3–4

Editorial | 02-November-2018

Editorial

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 28 , ISSUE 2, 3–3

Editorial | 02-November-2018

Guest Editorial

member Dr Jennifer Blundell who can help get you started. Hope to see lots of neuroscience nurses in New Zealand. Cheers

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 28 , ISSUE 2, 3–3

case-report | 30-November-2019

A Neuro Reflection

to the qualified staff needed to insert such devices. Local roles and responsibilities may differ substantially and education programs must be carefully crafted with the patient as the central focus. The World Federation of Neuroscience Nurses (WFNN) represents more than 8,800 members world-wide with representation from 13 countries. Initiatives over the last decade have been aimed at connecting nurses globally to promote the professional practice of neuroscience nursing, foster an open dialogue

Christi DeLemos, Vicki Evans, Dawn Tymianski

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 1, 7–8

Editorial | 30-November-2019

2020 The Year of the Nurse

acknowledging hospital staff for their commitment! Neuroscience nurses, across Australasia, in this together Flattening the curve, preventing the spread now or never! We have always worked hard and put our patients first, Sacrificed our safety and time to ensure patients are nursed! But now is the time to care for ourselves and ensure we get rest, So we can care for our patients and give them our very best.

Caroline Woon

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 1, 3–3

Editorial | 30-November-2019

2020Thoughts from the Editor and ANNA Executive

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 1, 3–3

research-article | 01-June-2020

Purposeful collaboration: Enriching lives for people with Parkinson’s disease

Vincent Carroll, Kirsten Deutschmann, Jessica Andrews

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 1, 32–43

Editorial | 01-June-2020

Pandemics and the neurological manifestations of viral respiratory illnesses including Covid-19.

Christie, Vicki and Dawn raise some really valid and pertinent thoughts and as I reflect on their guest editorial in our current Global crisis, the nexus between my two own areas of specialty becomes increasingly pellucid. After leaving clinical neuroscience practice for academia, immunisation and public health intervention is the mainstay of my clinical practice. Preventative health care measures have never been so imperative. From hand hygiene, cough etiquette and the elusive Covid-19 (SARS

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 1, 4–6

Editorial | 30-November-2019

Editorial

flattening the curve of cases. However, we know that it has not been like this in many other countries that have faces spiralling numbers of cases and insumountable conditions. Our guest editorial does bring back some of the fear and uncertainty that I have faced over the last few months, but mostly it reminds me of the sacrifices that we have all made. As neuroscience specialists many of us selected our area of practice or for others it selected us. Regardless of where we work, we work with passion, we

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 2, 3–5

Editorial | 30-November-2019

Guest Editorial

suspended from the sky and everything seemed to become unpredictable. However each country managed things differently. In New Zealand we experienced our first case on February 28 (See chart below for the growth). By 19 March, New Zealand closed it’s boarders to non-residents with gatherings of more than 100 people unable to continue. We were meant to be holding our annual New Zealand Australasian Neuroscience Nurses Association Conference a few days later and therefore could not proceed despite all the

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30 , ISSUE 2, 3–5

research-article | 01-May-2021

The Effect of Bevacizumab on Vestibular Schwannoma Related to Neurofibromatosis Type 2

helping to reduce tumour volume and improve hearing. The Australian experience is comparable to that illustrated in both the US and the UK, using standardised volumetric measurement techniques and response criteria, and acceptable appropriation of audiometric results. Australasian Neuroscience Nurses Day May 4th On 4 May, 1974, Tonnie Koenen organised the first meeting of Australasian neuroscience nurses in Canberra, during the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia’s annual meeting. About 30 nurses

Simone Ardern-Holmes, Cassandra White, Sarita Bahure, Simon So, Geoff McCowage, Elizabeth Hovey, Simon Troon, Paul De Souza, John Simes, Michael Slancar, Mark Dexter, Mark Wong

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 31 , ISSUE 1, 5–14

Editorial | 01-May-2021

2020 to 2021 and Beyond.: The Strength, Vision and Resilience of Workforces

mission statements. As Neuroscience Nurses we need to be leaders and we need to be reactive to the challenges that confront us. We also need vision and a strategic path towards it. We need to look beyond the dark horizon of Covid-19 and be guided, together with guiding those in our care. An essential part of this is understanding our workforce. It is only through measuring, monitoring and formally reviewing our workforce that we can adjust to meet the needs of individuals in our care. Vision is

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 31 , ISSUE 1, 3–4

Editorial | 01-May-2021

2020 Annual Demographic Survey of Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Nurse Specialists

David Tsui

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 31 , ISSUE 1, 3–4

research-article | 29-October-2021

Improving Clinical Nurses’ Competency and Nursing Care Using the Research Process Model

been very different. This was a satisfying nursing care accomplishment as a nurse.” Nurses also pointed out regrets such as, “I am ashamed that until now, we have simply gone about our work without giving it thought about the meaning of the care done. I want to continue learning more about specialized nursing care.” Stage 3: Greater motivation to learn about specialized neuroscience nursing and putting it into practice. Educational approaches were included in the research where nurses learned

Nobuko Okubo, Eriko Yokoyama, Keiko Honda, Kihoko Takeda, Hiromi Sakai, Rie Ishii, Yuriko Miura

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 31 , ISSUE 2, 15–17

research-article | 29-October-2021

Huntington’s Disease: A Nursing Perspective

Sarah V Samperi, Peter Kwong, Terence McGill, David S Tsui

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 31 , ISSUE 2, 18–26

research-article | 29-October-2021

The Road Less Travelled: Identifying Support Needs in Lewy Body Dementia

Madelaine B. Rañola

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 31 , ISSUE 2, 27–31

research-article | 29-October-2021

Differentiating Electrolyte and Fluid Disorders

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 31 , ISSUE 2, 15–17

Editorial | 29-October-2021

Workforce Challenges during the Covid-19 Pandemic

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 31 , ISSUE 2, 3–3

Editorial | 29-October-2021

Nursing Practice in the COVID-19 Pandemic in Japan

Australasian Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 31 , ISSUE 2, 3–3

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