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  • Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis

 

Research paper

Marble burying as compulsive behaviors in male and female mice

Marble burying is considered an, albeit controversial, animal model of the compulsive like behaviors of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Hallmark features of OCD patients are similarities and, more prominent, differences from anxiety disorders, e.g., the absence of sex differences and resistance to spontaneous remission. We report an experiment on marble burying by male and female C57/BL6/N mice. Animals were administered either the classic anxiolytic drug, diazepam, that targets the GABA

George T. Taylor, Sandra Lerch, Sabine Chourbaji

Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis , ISSUE 3, 254–260

Review

Developmental neurotoxicants and the vulnerable male brain: a systematic review of suspected neurotoxicants that disproportionally affect males

The prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs), including autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, tic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and emotional disturbances, has increased notably in the past few decades. To date, debate continues as to the origins of NDs. Increases in widespread exposure to and bioaccumulation of chemical neurotoxicants have paralleled the upsurge in NDs, and are suggested to be causal agents for NDs. One consistent aspect of NDs

Janet K. Kern, David A. Geier, Kristin G. Homme, Paul G. King, Geir Bjørklund, Salvatore Chirumbolo, Mark R. Geier

Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis , ISSUE 4, 269–296

Research Article

Psychological Difficulties among Children and Adolescents with Ethnic Danish, Immigrant, and Refugee Backgrounds

found significant differences among the groups, with Danish children reporting lower levels of conduct problems than both immigrant children (P < .01) and refugee children (P < .05). Refugee children also reported more peer problems (P < .05), more symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (P < .01), and more separation anxiety symptoms (P < .05) than the Danish children. No significant differences with regard to age or gender were found among the groups.Our data suggest that

Ingrid Leth, Janni Niclasen, Else Ryding, Yasmine Baroud, Barbara H. Esbjørn

Scandinavian Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology , ISSUE 1, 29–37

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