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  • Journal Of Epileptology

 

Review Paper | 06-April-2016

Anticonvulsant therapy in brain-tumor related epilepsy

seizures does not differ substantially from that applied to epilepsies from other etiologies. Therefore, the choice of an AED is based, above all, on tolerability and pharmacokinetic interactions with chemotherapeutic drugs. Levetiracetam is recommended by many authors as first-line therapy in brain tumor-related epilepsy. Due to the possibility of interactions, the combination of enzyme-inducing AEDs and chemotherapeutic drugs, is usually not recommended as a first choice. Currently there is no

Walter Fröscher, Timo Kirschstein, Johannes Rösche

Journal of Epileptology, Volume 24 , ISSUE 1, 41–56

Original Paper | 15-January-2018

Adenosine receptor agonists differentially affect the anticonvulsant action of carbamazepine and valproate against maximal electroshock test-induced seizures in mice

to aminophylline (5 mg/kg). Pharmacokinetic interactions were evident in case of the combination of CBZ + N6-benzyl-NECA (1 mg/kg) and resulted in an increased free plasma concentration of this CBZ. Interestingly, total brain concentration of CBZ confirmed the pharmacokinetic interaction as regards CBZ + N6-benzyl-NECA (1 mg/kg). Conclusion. The best profile was shown by the combination of CBZ + 2-chloroadenosine which involved no AE or a pharmacokinetic interaction. The remaining positive

Mirosław Jasiński, Magdalena Chrościńska-Krawczyk, Stanisław J. Czuczwar

Journal of Epileptology, Volume 25 , ISSUE 1-2, 21–29

review-article | 02-July-2019

Rational polytherapy: Myth or reality?

and toxicity models in which both AEDs are at least minimally effective; b) AED ratios reflecting those used in clinical setting; c) concentration analysis of AEDs in both plasma and brain, in order to exclude confounding pharmacokinetic interactions; and d) the use of appropriate methods of analysis, such as isobolography, because they measure effectiveness and determine infra-additive, additive, or supra-additive interactions (Brigo et al., 2013). Table 1. Preclinical synergistic antiepileptic

José Pimentel, José Manuel Lopes Lima

Journal of Epileptology, Volume 27 , 27–34

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