Search

  • Select Article Type
  • Abstract Supplements
  • Blood Group Review
  • Call to Arms
  • Hypothesis
  • In Memoriam
  • Interview
  • Introduction
  • Short Report
  • abstract
  • Abstracts
  • Article
  • book-review
  • case-report
  • case-study
  • Clinical Practice
  • Commentary
  • Conference Presentation
  • conference-report
  • congress-report
  • Correction
  • Editorial
  • Editorial Comment
  • Erratum
  • Events
  • Letter
  • Letter to Editor
  • mini-review
  • minireview
  • News
  • non-scientific
  • Obituary
  • original-paper
  • Original Research
  • Pictorial Review
  • Position Paper
  • Practice Report
  • Preface
  • Preliminary report
  • Product Review
  • rapid-communication
  • Report
  • research-article
  • Research Communicate
  • research-paper
  • Research Report
  • Review
  • review -article
  • review-article
  • Review Paper
  • Sampling Methods
  • Scientific Commentary
  • short-communication
  • short-report
  • Student Essay
  • Varia
  • Welome
  • Select Journal
  • Polish Journal Of Microbiology
  • Journal Of Nematology
  • South Australian Geographical Journal

 

Article

Sampling Error in Relation to Cyst Nematode Population Density Estimation in Small Field Plots

Cyst nematodes are serious plant-parasitic pests which could cause severe yield losses and extensive damage. Since there is still very little information about error of population density estimation in small field plots, this study contributes to the broad issue of population density assessment. It was shown that there was no significant difference between cyst counts of five or seven bulk samples taken per each 1-m2 plot, if average cyst count per examined plot exceeds 75 cysts per 100 g of

VESNA ZUPUNSKI, RADIVOJE JEVTIC, VESNA SPASIC JOKIC, LJUBICA ZUPUNSKI, MIRJANA LALOSEVIC, MIHAJLO CIRIC, ZIVKO CURCIC

Journal of Nematology , ISSUE 2, 150–155

original-paper

In situ Impact of the Antagonistic Fungal Strain, Trichoderma gamsii T30 on the Plant Pathogenic Fungus, Rhizoctonia solani in Soil

evaluate the in situ impact of the biocontrol strain on the population density of the plant pathogenic R. solani AG 2-2 strain G6 in the soil. For this purpose, microcosms containing the autoclaved or non-autoclaved soils were used. The microcosms were inoculated with both the pathogen (R. solani AG 2-2 strain G6) and the antagonist (T. gamsii strain T30) in different ratios. The population densities of the pathogenic fungus were followed up to day 25 using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) by

MUHAMMAD ANEES, MUHAMMAD ABID, SOBIA CHOHAN, MUHAMMAD JAMIL, NADEEM AHMED, LIXIN ZHANG, EUI SHIK RHA

Polish Journal of Microbiology , ISSUE 2, 211–216

research-article

Field and greenhouse evaluations of soil suppressiveness to Heterodera glycines in the Midwest corn-soybean production systems

effects of rotation on soybean and corn yields (Grabau and Chen, 2016a, 2016b). Benefits of rotation crops that are non-hosts to SCN are well known. An early study showed that crop rotation reduces SCN population density and improves the soybean yield in an SCN-infested field, and greater yields are obtained with longer rotation with non-hosts (Sasser and Uzzell, 1991). However, corn is less effective than leguminous non-hosts (Miller et al., 2006; Warnke et al., 2006), and a single year of corn

Weiming Hu, Eyob Kidane, Deborah A. Neher, Senyu Chen

Journal of Nematology , 1–12

research-article

Spatial distribution and risk area assessment of Aphelenchoides besseyi using geostatistical approaches in Giridih district of Jharkhand, India

Heterodera trifolii infestation in Chinese cabbage field (Kabir et al., 2018). In another example, Evans et al. (2003) used hotspot analysis for site-specific management of potato cyst nematode in the UK. The above examples suggest that application of geospatial techniques could help in generating detailed information of the nematode spatial distribution pattern and identify areas with high population density (Hill, 1988; Van Bezooijen, 2006). This information could guide implementation of site-specific

Sandip Mondal, Matiyar Rahaman Khan, Abhishek Mukherjee

Journal of Nematology , 1–16

Article

Vertical Distribution of Pasteuria penetrans Parasitizing Meloidogyne incognita on Pittosporum tobira in Florida

distribution of Pasteuria penetrans and its relationship with the nematode host in the soil was investigated to identify (i) the vertical distribution of P. penetrans endospores in an irrigated P. tobira field and (ii) the relationship among P. penetrans endospore density, M. incognita J2 population density, and host plant root distribution over time. Soil bioassays revealed that endospore density was greater in the upper 18 cm of the top soil compared with the underlying depths. A correlation analysis

RICHARD BAIDOO, TESFAMARIAM MEKETE MENGISTU, JANETE A. BRITO, ROBERT MCSORLEY, ROBERT H. STAMPS, WILLIAM T. CROW

Journal of Nematology , ISSUE 3, 311–315

Article

The Future of Australian Rural Communities: How Powerful are the Forces of Change?

This paper tests how far population change in 412 rural communities of south-eastern Australia is predetermined by five ‘drivers’: remoteness, amenity, town size, rural population density, and concentration/dispersal of the population. Testing their combined impact through multiple correlation analysis, it finds that over the ten-year period 1996-2006, the status of the five drivers measured in 1996 explains (statistically) some 53% of the variance in the actual population change in the

PETER J. SMAILES, TREVOR L.C. GRIFFIN, NEIL M. ARGENT

South Australian Geographical Journal , 18–42

Article

Management of Root-knot Nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) onPittosporum tobira Under Greenhouse, Field, and On-farm Conditions in Florida

(=Paecilomyces lilacinus) strain 251. Treatment applications were made during the spring and fall seasons according to manufacturer’s specifications. Efficacy was evaluated based on J2/100 cm3 of soil, J2/g of root, and crop yield (kg/plot). Unlike spirotetramat, which did not demonstrate any measurable effects on Meloidogyne incognita J2 in the soil, furfural and P. lilacinum were marginally effective in reducing the population density of M. incognita on Pittosporum tobira. However, nematode reduction did

RICHARD BAIDOO, TESFAMARIAM MENGISTU, ROBERT MCSORLEY, ROBERT H. STAMPS, JANETE BRITO, WILLIAM T. CROW

Journal of Nematology , ISSUE 2, 133–139

research-article

The effects of Meloidogyne incognita and Heterodera glycines on the yield and quality of edamame (Glycine max l.) in Arkansas

when nematode management is needed. Many factors, in addition to nematode population density, play a role in determining the threshold including soil type, temperature, time, and host (McSorely and Duncan, 1995). The goals of this study were to document the nematodes that were present in Arkansas edamame fields and determine the effect of two major nematode species on edamame yield and quality. The objectives were to: survey edamame production areas in Arkansas for plant-parasitic nematodes

J. E. Wilkes, T. L. Kirkpatrick

Journal of Nematology , 1–15

research-article

In vivo production of entomopathogenic nematodes using Galleria mellonella: costs and effect of diets on nematode pathogenicity

variances using Levene’s test. Mortality rates (percentage) of insects due to EPN isolates were corrected according to Abbott (1925). To stabilize the variance of means, mortality data (%) were transformed with square-root arc sine (arc sin √x) (Gomez, 1984) prior to analysis of variance (ANOVA). Nematode population density was log10(x + 1) transformed to normalize the data prior to analyses. Data were subjected to ANOVA using R (version 3.5.1). The differences between treatment means were compared at P

Régina Kotchofa, Hugues Baimey

journal of nematology , 1–15

research-article

First report of the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne morocciensis infecting peach in Southern Brazil

studies (n = 20). Additionally, individual females (n = 20) were extracted from the peach roots and identified by electrophoresis using α-esterase (Est) and malate dehydrogenase (Mdh) phenotypes (Carneiro and Almeida, 2001) and perineal patterns (Taylor and Netscher, 1974). The nematode population density in the samples was 283 eggs and J2s per gram of fresh roots. Perineal patterns of females (Fig. 2B,C) showed oval squared shapes, with moderately high to high dorsal arches, striae widely separated

W. R. Silva, C. P. Machaca-Calsin, C. B. Gomes

Journal of Nematology , 1–3

Research Article

Short-term Impacts of Tillage and Fertilizer Treatments on Soil and Root Borne Nematodes and Maize Yield in a Fine Textured Cambisol

specific study site, semi-endoparasitic nematodes were higher under rip line seeding and basin planting compared to conventional tillage. The authors conclude that (i) plant-parasitic nematode genera exhibited differential responses to different tillage systems but were not affected by fertilizer application, and (ii) in the present study, maize grain yield response under different tillage and fertilizer regimes was overall not related to nematode population density and composition.

N. Mashavakure, A. B. Mashingaidze, R. Musundire, E. Gandiwa, V. K. Muposhi, C. Thierfelder, N. Nhamo, T. Bere, S. S. Akhtar

Journal of Nematology , ISSUE 3, 329–342

Article

First Report of the Carolina Spiral Nematode, Scutellonema brachyurus, from Soil of a Garden in Crete, Greece

cropped with cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) in spring–summer and leaf vegetables such as spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) in autumn–winter. The soil was collected 1 mon after the end of chicory crop. A population density (ca. 30 individuals/100 cm3 of soil) of spiral nematodes (Scutellonema sp.) was found by extracting soil with the wet sieving and decanting method (Cobb, 1918). Morphological and molecular analyses of females identified

EMMANUEL A. TZORTZAKAKIS, CAROLINA CANTALAPIEDRA-NAVARRETE, ANTONIO ARCHIDONA-YUSTE, JUAN E. PALOMARES-RIUS, PABLO CASTILLO

Journal of Nematology , ISSUE 1, 7–7

Research Article

First Report of Stubby-Root Nematode, Paratrichodorus minor, on Onion in Georgia, U.S.A

and sand, and then inoculated with 1,000 fresh P. minor. Plants were grown for 9 wk in a greenhouse at 25 ± 2°C prior to extraction of nematodes from soil. Plant roots were abbreviated and final population density of P. minor was 2,856 ± 104 per pot (285 nematodes/100 cm3 of soil) confirming the nematode parasitism on onion. To our knowledge, this is the first report of P. minor parasitizing onion in Georgia. Stubby-root nematode (Paratrichodorus sp.) has already been reported on corn, St

Abolfazl Hajihassani, Negin Hamidi, Bhabesh Dutta, Chris Tyson

Journal of Nematology , ISSUE 3, 453–455

No Record Found..
Page Actions