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Article

Travelling narratives and images in times of migration

Introduction Migrant narratives and aesthetic practices influenced by experiences of exile and migration constitute a growing field in contemporary art and literature. Current trends in migration and globalisation have lead to an increase in travelling narratives, images and objects, and the production of aesthetic practices describing and problematising exile and migration, working in and through tradition. Migratory patterns and issues related to the protection of refugees and asylum seekers

Sigrun Åsebø, Anje Müller Gjesdal, Camilla Skalle

Borderlands , ISSUE 1, 1–11

Article

Between the land and the sea: Refugee experiences of the lighthouse as a real and symbolic border

Introduction As the refugee crisis extends across Europe and elsewhere, seascapes are taking on new dimensions, with borders being redrawn away from shorelines. Refugees are now crossing waters that have become extended to constitute newly forged sovereign borders that are subject to increased maritime surveillance, organised to prevent refugees landing on European and Australian shores. This has reinforced the significance of the distinction between land and sea and foregrounded the role of

Uma Kothari

Borderlands , ISSUE 1, 63–87

Article

Transgressing borders with participatory video technologies: Reflections on creative knowledge production with asylum seekers in Australia

the city. These perspectives are necessary in the Australian context given a universalised aesthetic framed by media coverage and reporting on the European migration crisis in 2015-2016 that racialises and dehumanises asylum seeker bodies, but has cumulated into a global leitmotif of the refugee experience (Bleiker et al 2013; Burrell & Hörschelmann 2018; Pallister-Wilkins 2019). By positioning newcomers to Australia as urban citizens we intervene in these debates that focus on refugees and asylum

Michele Lobo, Kaya Barry

Borderlands , ISSUE 2, 8–36

Article

Bordering: Creating, contesting and resisting practice

whereby admission routes are policed, people are detained in offshore and onshore centres and are subjected to long and often indefinite waiting, asylum seekers are criminalised and access to welfare is restricted or even withheld. This crafting of a ‘hostile environment’ is designed to deter refugees while enabling governments to fulfil their formal commitments to international refugee law (Gammeltoft-Hansen and Hathaway 2015, p. 7). Thus, while stigmatisation may be used to create borders

Elise Klein, Uma Kothari

Borderlands , ISSUE 2, 1–7

Article

Bordering: Creating, contesting and resisting practice

whereby admission routes are policed, people are detained in offshore and onshore centres and are subjected to long and often indefinite waiting, asylum seekers are criminalised and access to welfare is restricted or even withheld. This crafting of a ‘hostile environment’ is designed to deter refugees while enabling governments to fulfil their formal commitments to international refugee law (Gammeltoft-Hansen and Hathaway 2015, p. 7). Thus, while stigmatisation may be used to create borders

Elise Klein, Uma Kothari

Borderlands , ISSUE 1, 1–7

Article

No Friend but the Mountains and Manus prison theory: In conversation

see something about settler colonialism and about settlers in Australia that we, as settlers, can’t see. There is special knowledge in Manus Island and that’s something that is extremely important about the book. The book is pedagogical, it’s educative. The book creates new knowledge for us. There’s something that refugees who have been subject to our policies, subject to our harsh treatment can tell us about ourselves. And in many ways settlers in Australia become the prisoners. We’re the ones

Behrouz Boochani, Omid Tofighian

Borderlands , ISSUE 1, 8–26

Article

Il volo: Wim Wenders’ short documentary on hybrid space in Calabrian shrinking cities

), such as the hilltop medieval village of Riace. Its mayor Mimmo Lucano was the first to come ‘up with the brainwave of repopulating the town with irregular migrants, refugees and asylum-seekers from countries such as Afghanistan, Eritrea, Iraq, the Lebanon and Somalia’ (Fossi 2010). Soon, other municipalities followed the example of Riace and, despite the threats of the ‘Ndrangheta’, the Calabrian ‘mafia’, the immigrants actually revived economic, educational and cultural activities (Sasso 2009

Inge Lanslots

Borderlands , ISSUE 1, 133–145

Article

Westphalian sovereignty as a zombie category in Australia

been denied ‘forms of life’ and excluded because of how they move or stay still, while other (im)mobile subjects, including European settlers, white Australians, skilled migrants and ‘genuine refugees’, have been included due to their ideal (im)mobile ‘forms of life’. 2 Even though traditional conceptions of sovereignty do not accurately describe Australia’s contemporary sovereign structure, Westphalian sovereignty continues as a zombie by informing Australian political and public discourse. It

Louis Everuss

Borderlands , ISSUE 1, 115–146

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