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  • Journal Of Ultrasonography

 

original-paper

Non-invasive diagnosis of aortic arch anomalies in children – 15 years of own experience

or interrupted aortic arch were excluded from the study. We analyzed clinical data, echo recordings, as well as data on the treatment of 115 children with aortic arch abnormalities. The group included 58 boys and 57 girls aged between 1 day and 17 years (full pediatric age range). Results The following aortic arch anomalies were detected in the study group: Left aortic arch (LAA) + aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA); Right aortic arch (RAA) + left brachiocephalic trunk (LBCT); RAA

Wojciech Mądry, Maciej Aleksander Karolczak, Marcin Myszkowski, Ewa Zacharska-Kokot

Journal of Ultrasonography , ISSUE 76, 5–8

case-report

Isolation of the left subclavian artery in an infant with tetralogy of Fallot, right aortic arch and DiGeorge syndrome. Echocardiographic diagnostic case study

Introduction Isolated left subclavian artery (iLSA) coexisting with right aortic arch is a rarely described vascular anomaly. It is a consequence of impaired aortic arch formation, when the arterial duct connects the left subclavian artery with the pulmonary trunk (Fig. 1). Other congenital defects that coexist with iLSA (60% of cases) and are usually found in the right side of the heart include tetralogy of Fallot (ToF)(1–6), double outlet right ventricle (DORV)(7), tricuspid atresia(1

Maciej A. Karolczak, Wojciech Mądry, Darren James Grégoire

Journal of Ultrasonography , ISSUE 76, 66–70

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